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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Derek Sawbridge, David Bright and Robin Smith

There is little tradition of regional studies in the field of industrial relations. Most of the existing work with a regional flavour is on comparative labour markets. The…

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Abstract

There is little tradition of regional studies in the field of industrial relations. Most of the existing work with a regional flavour is on comparative labour markets. The reason for the absence of structural or institutional studies is because of the obvious methodological problem of disaggregating purely regional influences from broader national factors—economic, political, social or legislative.

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Employee Relations, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Publication date: 28 November 2019

Tom Mordue

The North East of England has entered the global bazaar in which its landscape, once pock marked by the scars of industries like coalmining, shipbuilding and steelmaking…

Abstract

The North East of England has entered the global bazaar in which its landscape, once pock marked by the scars of industries like coalmining, shipbuilding and steelmaking, has been cleaned up, beautified, and it has now entered the global competition between post-industrial places for inward investment and the spoils of the ever-expanding UK tourism industry. With this, the North East’s visitor economy now generates around £3.6 billion of expenditure each year, supporting some 54,600 jobs in 2018. The visitor economy is not only important as a stand-alone sector in the North East, but is integral to the whole North East economy, and needs to be a major driver of social change and diversification within it. As the Newcastle Gateshead Initiative says: the twenty first century North East is a place of vibrancy, with a quality of life that makes it a great place to visit, live and work, study and invest – which is a strapline narrative that clearly signals how tourism is indeed both an essential and integrated part of North East life. Brexit may provide the North East tourism industry with a stronger global stage.

This chapter charts the logic of that development and asks: is it a good thing, who benefits and who loses from the sectors development. It asks whose North East are we talking about as we prepare to enter what is anticipated to be a difficult and an uncertain third decade of the twenty-first century?

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The North East After Brexit: Impact and Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-009-7

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Pooran Wynarczyk

This paper aims to investigate the “gender management gap” in the scientific labour market in the North East of England. The paper seeks to compare and contrast…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the “gender management gap” in the scientific labour market in the North East of England. The paper seeks to compare and contrast employment, ownership, management structure and capacity between men and women in the Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical investigation is based on a survey of 60 SET‐based small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), operating in the North East of England.

Findings

The results show that women are particularly under‐represented in managerial and senior positions of scientific nature in the private sector in the North East of England. The “glass ceiling” effect appears to be widespread.

Research limitations/implications

There are very limited empirical data and research on the nature and level of participation of women in the scientific managerial labour market at firm level in the UK. There is a need for more rigorous research at firm and regional levels to examine the cumulative effects of underlying factors that prevent women from progression, beyond the “glass ceiling”, in the scientific labour market.

Practical implications

This paper builds upon a research project funded by the ESRC Science in Society Programme. The key findings have resulted in a subsequent award from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Impact Grants to establish the “North East Role Model Platform for Innovative Women” in the light of the Science City Initiative.

Originality/value

The “gender management gap” in the scientific labour market in the North East of England has not, empirically, been investigated before and appears to be a highly neglected area of public policy and research.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 30 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Publication date: 28 November 2019

Debbie Porteous

The long-term plan for the National Health Service (NHS, 2019) identifies a blueprint to make the NHS fit for the future with a greater focus on prevention, improving…

Abstract

The long-term plan for the National Health Service (NHS, 2019) identifies a blueprint to make the NHS fit for the future with a greater focus on prevention, improving services for patients and the importance of integrating services to make them more effective and efficient. The challenge is in the delivery and who is responsible to implement changes. The key is to enable staff at local levels to have responsibility for ensuring that the health and social needs of their local population are met.

Established to oversee the implementation is the NHS Assembly with 50 individuals from across the health and care sector to advise NHS England and NHS Improvement on the implementation. This requires shared commitment and motivation to change; ensuring patient centred care is at the forefront of any changes to delivering care. At regional level, Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships and Integrated Care Systems are groups of local NHS organisations, local councils and other partners, who are working together in the region to develop and implement the NHS plan. There are many challenges ahead to ensure the plan delivers better regional health and social care, including the impending UK’s decision to leave the European Union. Brexit may present some opportunities but if freedom of movement and membership of the single market and customs union end as planned, NHS and social care face several significant threats in the region.

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The North East After Brexit: Impact and Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-009-7

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Basagaitz Guereno-Omil, Gergina Pavlova-Hannam and Kevin Hannam

Contemporary mobilities research has demonstrated a fundamental blurring between work, leisure and tourism practices for migrants as they seek to construct new lifestyles…

Abstract

Purpose

Contemporary mobilities research has demonstrated a fundamental blurring between work, leisure and tourism practices for migrants as they seek to construct new lifestyles whilst maintaining connections with their homelands. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the results of a research project that analysed the work and leisure experiences of Polish migrants living in the North East of England using a mobilities theoretical approach. In this paper, the authors focus on the reasons influencing their migration and their leisure and tourism mobility practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The results are based upon a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods gathering a sample of 90 questionnaires and 11 focus groups.

Findings

Based upon a statistical analysis of the questionnaires using SPSS and textual analysis applied to the focus group transcriptions, different gendered work, leisure and tourism mobilities were identified relating to family attachments and social ties.

Research limitations/implications

The authors argue that seemingly mundane leisure and tourism practices can often be a catalyst for greater mobility, and this mobility has significant gender dimensions.

Originality/value

This paper thus provides new insights into the interweaving of different gendered work and leisure mobility practices based upon empirical findings of Polish migrants to the North East of England.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Ignazio Cabras

With the triggering of Article 50, the uncertainty around Brexit and the outcomes of the UK/EU negotiations process associated with the UK leaving the EU have catalysed…

Abstract

With the triggering of Article 50, the uncertainty around Brexit and the outcomes of the UK/EU negotiations process associated with the UK leaving the EU have catalysed British political debate. This situation has had and still has significant economic implications for thousands of businesses operating in the UK and in the region.

It is likely that impact of Brexit will be much larger for the North East of England compared to the other English regions, despite the Leave vote winning an overwhelming majority in the region. Many areas in the North East have heavily relied on public sector jobs and investments in the past and benefited from substantial European funding provided over the last few decades to support infrastructure, regeneration and training activities. Over 70,000 jobs were created in the region because of EU investments between 2007 and 2013, and thousands more jobs still depend on the investments being made under the 2014–2020 programming period.

This chapter analyses the economic implications that Brexit will generate for the North East of England. Focussing on data gathered from the post-crisis time, the author examines the most recent policies and findings in the literature, critically evaluating and presenting what a post-Brexit North East will be like from an economic and social perspective.

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The North East After Brexit: Impact and Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-009-7

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Publication date: 1 January 2014

Lee Pugalis and Gill Bentley

Refining and updating Harvey’s theorisation of the shift from managerialism to entrepreneurialism, this chapter charts the changing business of entrepreneurial governance…

Abstract

Purpose

Refining and updating Harvey’s theorisation of the shift from managerialism to entrepreneurialism, this chapter charts the changing business of entrepreneurial governance through an examination of English economic development practice. Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs), sub-national entrepreneurial governance entities, provide the empirical lens to understand the contemporary role of private interests in the pursuit of public goals in securing innovative approaches to economic development.

Methodology/approach

Comparative analysis of the strategic priorities, ways of working and interventions of LEPs operating across Greater Birmingham and the North East of England is undertaken against the backdrop of a competitive environment where the mantra is ‘the market knows best’.

Findings

The key finding is that while some policy outcomes are prosaic, albeit across contextually distinct entrepreneurial governance places, more innovative policy approaches are emerging.

Practical implications

The chapter shows that there remains value in business involvement in urban governance in its present mode. A more permissive, entrepreneurial mode of governance with the liberation of private enterprise may be leading to imaginative as well as boosterist ways of securing sustainable growth.

Originality/value of the chapter

The chapter suggests some options for policy-makers and a series of challenges for decision-makers.

Details

Enterprising Places: Leadership and Governance Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-641-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2009

Dorothy Newbury‐Birch, Barbara Harrison, Nicola Brown and Eileen Kaner

The annual cost of alcohol‐related harm in the UK is estimated to be between £17.7 and £25.1 billion with healthcare costs alone reaching £2.7 billion and the costs of

Abstract

The annual cost of alcohol‐related harm in the UK is estimated to be between £17.7 and £25.1 billion with healthcare costs alone reaching £2.7 billion and the costs of alcohol‐fuelled crime and disorder accounting for £7.3 billion each year. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUD) in prison and probation settings in the North East of England, and to compare the ability of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and Offender Assessment System (OASys) at identifying alcohol‐related need in probation clients. A quantitative prevalence study was carried out using anonymous questionnaires with participants from four prisons and three probation offices in the North East who voluntarily completed the AUDIT questionnaire during a 1‐month period in 2006. Response outcomes on AUDIT were compared with OASys scores which identify alcohol‐related need in probation. At the time of the study OASys scores were not available for offenders in prison. Seven hundred and fifteen questionnaires were completed. Sixty‐three per cent of men and 57% of women were identified as having an AUD with over a third of all individuals scoring within the possibly dependant range (20+ on AUDIT). Around 40% of probation cases who were classified as either hazardous, harmful or possibly dependant drinkers on AUDIT were not identified by OASys. The results indicate that the prevalence of AUD in offenders is much higher than in the general population. In addition, current methods of identifying offenders with alcohol‐related need in probation are flawed and as many such people go undetected. Alcohol assessment procedures need to be improved in criminal justice setting order to correctly identify people with AUD.

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Keith Shaw

This chapter considers the impact of Brexit on devolution within England, focussing particularly on the implications for the governance of the rural North of England. It…

Abstract

This chapter considers the impact of Brexit on devolution within England, focussing particularly on the implications for the governance of the rural North of England. It captures how Brexit adds uncertainty and complexity to the devolution deal process that has been criticised for its lack of clear principles, lack of rural focus and the creation of artificial governance boundaries. In contrast, the chapter argues that Brexit has served to allow space for devolution to take shape locally – as the centre is preoccupied by ‘high’ politics – and has reinforced the importance of taking on the interests of rural areas and small towns more seriously.

In focussing on the recent developments in devolution in Northern England, including the Borderlands Growth Deal and the new 2019 North of Tyne Combined Authority, the chapter concludes by outlining how order is emerging out of chaos in terms of the decluttering of devolution governance, how new forms of place-making can emerge in the Northern Powerhouse and how more genuine rural devolution deals are achievable in the period ahead.

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The North East After Brexit: Impact and Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-009-7

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2017

Jon Warren

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the application of social policy in the North East of England is often characterised by tension and conflict. The agencies and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the application of social policy in the North East of England is often characterised by tension and conflict. The agencies and professionals charged with implementation of Westminster driven policies constantly seek to deploy their knowledge of local conditions in order to make them both practical and palatable.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the region via established literature from history, geography, sociology and social policy. The paper gives illustrations via empirical work which has evaluated initiatives to improve the health of long term health-related benefit recipients and to sustain individuals in employment in the region.

Findings

Central to the paper’s argument is the notion of “biographies of place”. The core of this idea is that places have biographies in the same way as individuals and possess specific identities. These biographies have been shaped by the intersections between environment, history, culture and economic and social policy. The paper identifies the region’s economic development, subsequent decline and the alliance of labour politics and industrial employers around a common consensus that sought economic prosperity and social progress via a vision of “modernisation” as a key component of this biography.

Originality/value

The paper argues that an appreciation of these spatial biographies can result in innovative and more effective social policy interventions with the potential to address issues that affect entire localities.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 11-12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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