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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Tua A. Björklund and Norris F. Krueger

The emerging perspectives of entrepreneurial ecosystems, bricolage and effectuation highlight the interaction between the entrepreneur and the surrounding community, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The emerging perspectives of entrepreneurial ecosystems, bricolage and effectuation highlight the interaction between the entrepreneur and the surrounding community, and its potential for creative resource acquisition and utilization. However, empirical work on how this process actually unfolds remains scarce. This paper aims to study the interaction between the opportunity construction process and the development of resources in the surrounding ecosystem.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a qualitative analysis of the extreme case of Aalto Entrepreneurship Society (Aaltoes), a newly founded organization successfully promoting entrepreneurship within a university merger with virtually no resources, based on interviews of six key contributors and four stakeholder organizations.

Findings

The opportunity construction process both supported and was supported by two key resource generating mechanisms. Formulating and opportunistically reformulating the agenda for increasing potential synergy laid the groundwork for mutual benefit. Proactive concretization enhanced both initial resource allocation and sustaining input to the process through offering tangible instances of specific opportunities and feedback.

Research limitations/implications

Although based on a single case study in a university setting, proactive concretization emerges as a promising direction for further investigations of the benefits and dynamics of entrepreneur–ecosystem interaction in the opportunity construction process.

Practical implications

Intentionally creating beneficial entrepreneur–ecosystem interaction and teaching proactive concretization becomes a key goal for educators of entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

The paper extends an understanding of creative resource generation and utilization in the opportunity construction process. The role of proactive concretization was emphasized in the interaction of the entrepreneur and the ecosystem, creating virtuous spirals of entrepreneurial activity.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2011

Norris Krueger, David J. Hansen, Theresa Michl and Dianne H.B. Welsh

If we are to better understand what it means to think “sustainably,” the entrepreneurship literature suggests that entrepreneurial cognition offers us two powerful tools…

Abstract

If we are to better understand what it means to think “sustainably,” the entrepreneurship literature suggests that entrepreneurial cognition offers us two powerful tools. Human cognition operates with two nearly parallel systems for information processing, intentional and automatic. Entrepreneurial cognition has long focused on how entrepreneurial thinking and action are inherently intentional. Thus, intentions-based approaches are needed to understand how to encourage the identification of actionable sustainable opportunities. But first, however, we need to address key elements of our automatic processing, anchored on deep assumptions and beliefs. In short, if sustainable entrepreneurship is about addressing sustainable opportunities, then before we can take advantage of research into entrepreneurial intentions, we need a better understanding of how we enact our deep mental models of constructs such as “sustainable.”

Details

Social and Sustainable Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-073-5

Abstract

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Sarah Robinson, Helle Neergaard, Lene Tanggaard and Norris Krueger

The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion about the complexity and heterogeneity of entrepreneurship education. In order to achieve this objective, this…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion about the complexity and heterogeneity of entrepreneurship education. In order to achieve this objective, this paper combines educational psychology with perspectives from entrepreneurship education research to make explicit educators tacit assumptions in order to understand how these assumptions guide teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Using ethnographic analysis, the paper reports data from the continuous development and implementation of a single course over a period of ten years bringing in the educator’s and the students perspectives on their achievements and course content.

Findings

We find that it is sometimes advantageous to invoke and combine different learning theories and approaches in order to promote entrepreneurial awareness and mindset. It is also necessary to move away from entrepreneurship education as being teacher-led to being more student-centered and focused on experiential and existential lifelong learning practices.

Practical implications

Practically, we make suggestions for the design and delivery of a course that demonstrates how four diverse learning theories can be combined to consolidate entrepreneurial learning in students invoking experiential and curiosity based learning strategies.

Originality/value

There are very few examples of concrete course designs that have been researched longitudinally in-depth using ethnographic methods. Moreover, most courses focus on the post-foundation period, whereas this paper presents a course that is a primer to the entrepreneurial process and exclusively centered on the pre-foundation phase. Rather than building on a single perspective, it combines a range of theories and approaches to create interplay and progression.

Details

Education + Training , vol. 58 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Norris Krueger

States that an organization that seeks to survive must keep identifying viable new opportunities. An organization that wishes to grow must do an even better job of…

Abstract

States that an organization that seeks to survive must keep identifying viable new opportunities. An organization that wishes to grow must do an even better job of identifying viable new opportunities. However, opportunities are in the eye of the beholder. Identifying opportunities does not mean “find” them, rather we construct or invent them. How do we encourage the identification of viable, credible opportunities? Maybe even more important is the converse: why do decision makers fail to see objectively viable opportunities?

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Dianne H.B. Welsh and Norris Krueger

If there is one thing that truly characterizes entrepreneurship and especially social entrepreneurship, it is the “engaged scholarship” at their very heart. That is…

Abstract

Purpose

If there is one thing that truly characterizes entrepreneurship and especially social entrepreneurship, it is the “engaged scholarship” at their very heart. That is, teaching, outreach/service and research are connected, often tightly. The purpose of this paper therefore is to discuss the evolution of social entrepreneurship and the lessons learned.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on the results of a multi‐country survey dealing with social entrepreneurship.

Findings

It is found that a lot of maturing needs to be done in the area of social entrepreneurship work.

Originality/value

This paper provides real value to the literature by showing what is actually done in the teaching of social entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Veronica Scuotto, Elisa Arrigo, Elena Candelo and Melita Nicotra

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new perspective on ambidextrous innovation orientation looking at how the current digital transformation is accepted in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new perspective on ambidextrous innovation orientation looking at how the current digital transformation is accepted in the fashion industry in Italy. Precisely, the objective of the paper is to test whether the use of social media platforms positively influences ambidextrous innovation orientation in fashion companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical quantitative research was carried out on a sample of 853 small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) operating in the fashion industry in Italy. Using a logistic regression methodology, four hypotheses were tested to verify the correlation of four dimensions of social media platforms with an ambidextrous innovation orientation among fashion firms.

Findings

The four hypotheses were validated: the structural dimension, the relational behaviour dimension, the cognitive dimension and knowledge transfer practices of social media platforms were proven to positively influence ambidextrous innovation orientation in fashion firms.

Research limitations/implications

Though this is one of the few research studies that offers a quantitative analysis in this field, it could be further developed, for instance by extending the sample of firms to SMEs operating in other countries or by comparing multinationals with SMEs.

Originality/value

This paper provides an original contribution to studies on the use of social media to promote ambidexterity in firms, which has only been studied to a limited extent in the extant literature. From this perspective, the originality of the study is further strengthened by the unique context of analysis, namely, the fashion industry in Italy.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Marina Dabić, Božidar Vlačić, Veronica Scuotto and Merrill Warkentin

The Journal of Intellectual Capital (JIC) is one of the leading academic journals in the field of business and management, with an impact factor of 3.744, according to…

Abstract

Purpose

The Journal of Intellectual Capital (JIC) is one of the leading academic journals in the field of business and management, with an impact factor of 3.744, according to Journal Citation Reports from Clarivate Analytics, 2019. This study reports the results of a content analysis of the JIC articles that have been published since the journal was founded in 2000, in order to highlight its significant contribution and identify potential future research avenues within the business and management field.

Design/methodology/approach

Scopus database, complemented by the Web of Science (WOS) Core Collection, was used. Furthermore, this study graphically maps over 20 years' worth of bibliographic material, using the visualization of similarities (VOS) to present an overview of the journal and identify future research avenues.

Findings

The paper provides an overview of a total of 700 articles and editorial notes, authored by leading authors from various universities, as well as collating the research themes explored during the 20 year period between 2000 and 2019. The prestigious positioning of this journal is evidenced both through the increasing number of citations received from other highly regarded journals and through its impact upon the establishment of new streams of research.

Practical implications

By applying a bibliometric analysis, this paper offers an overview of past and current themes on intellectual capital (IC).

Originality/value

This article delivers an in-depth and rigorous analysis of the fields and research streams interrogated by the JIC over the last 20 years and offers potential topics for future research, which could stimulate authors and inspire advancements in research for years to come.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Raquel Chafloque-Cespedes, Aldo Alvarez-Risco, Paula-Viviana Robayo-Acuña, Carlos-Antonio Gamarra-Chavez, Gabriel-Mauricio Martinez-Toro and Wagner Vicente-Ramos

This chapter is designed with the aim to determine the influence of sociodemographic variables on the capacity to generate social enterprises, such as sex, the student’s

Abstract

This chapter is designed with the aim to determine the influence of sociodemographic variables on the capacity to generate social enterprises, such as sex, the student’s country, if only they study or if they study and work, as well as if they participate or direct a social enterprise in university students of Latin American business schools. This research adopted an inductive quantitative approach using a questionnaire. The participants were university students of business schools from Colombia, Mexico and Peru. Second-generation structural equation method (SEM-PLS) was used to analyse the results, using the SmartPLS 3.2.7 software applied to data on 3,739 university students. The results suggest that the entrepreneur role, labour situation, country and sex have a moderating effect in the relation between entrepreneurial orientation and entrepreneurial intention. Also, by using resampling technique Bootstrapping (5,000 times,p < 0.01), significance of the trajectory coefficients (beta) and effect size of the coefficients (beta) were measured to demonstrate significance. Finally, with this research the authors ascertain that entrepreneurial orientation positively influences entrepreneurial intention. thus explaining 42.4% of its variance. This chapter is the first attempt on investigating in university students of Latin American business schools about factors of entrepreneurship orientation and entrepreneurship intention, and has strong potential to contribute to development of policies and strategies to promote the growth of entrepreneurship activities in the universities.

Details

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2011

Abstract

Details

Social and Sustainable Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-073-5

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