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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Nita G. Brooks, Melinda L. Korzaan and Stoney Brooks

This paper builds on previous research in information systems (IS) project management by focusing on key antecedents proposed to play important roles in influencing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper builds on previous research in information systems (IS) project management by focusing on key antecedents proposed to play important roles in influencing normative commitment within the IS project environment. The study also further investigates the influence of normative commitment on intentions to continue.

Design/methodology/approach

To collect data for this study, a field survey was administered online, and individuals were selected for participation by a member of upper management from Fortune 500 companies located in the United States. Two-hundred and thirty two (232) survey responses were collected. The model was analyzed using PLS-SEM.

Findings

The results indicated that personal investment, personal responsibility, voluntariness, project-specific self-efficacy and problem-solving competency were all significantly related to normative commitment. Project-specific self-efficacy, problem-solving competency and normative commitment directly influenced intention to continue. Additionally, problem-solving competency moderated both the relationships of project-specific self-efficacy to normative commitment and project-specific self-efficacy to intention to continue. The resulting model explains 63% of intention to continue and 58% of normative commitment.

Originality/value

The findings from this study contribute to commitment theory and enhance one’s understanding of IS project environments by exploring specific antecedents related to developing normative commitment. Additionally, the impact of normative commitment on intention to continue was enhanced by examining key moderating relationships to the model.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Mark Ojeme and Julie Robson

This study examines the mediating effect of normative commitment, that is, a customer's feeling of moral obligation to stay in a relationship based on the psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the mediating effect of normative commitment, that is, a customer's feeling of moral obligation to stay in a relationship based on the psychological feeling that it is the right thing to do. Previous studies have neglected normative commitment due to its complexity and poor fit with predominantly Western individualistic cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was conducted in the collectivist culture of Nigeria, West Africa. The unit of analysis was the business-to-business (B2B) relationship between small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and their bank.

Findings

This study arrived at two key findings. First, normative commitment is insignificant in acting as the mediator of a relationship in both overall satisfaction and social bonding on advocacy. Second, overall satisfaction and social bonding are positively significant in predicting normative commitment and advocacy.

Research limitations/implications

This study focussed solely on an SME's perception of their relationship with their bank and does not consider the dyadic nature of such relationships, that is, the bank's perception of this relationship.

Practical implications

This research demonstrates that the SME/bank relationship can be developed based on satisfaction and social bonding as background variables. Caution should be exercised for relationships developed on the basis of a moral obligatory commitment.

Originality/value

Regardless of a collectivist cultural setting, normative commitment was found to be ineffective in enhancing relationships in a business-oriented setting in Nigeria, contrary to emerging propositions within the literature.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Piyali Ghosh, Alka Rai, Ragini Chauhan, Gargi Baranwal and Divya Srivastava

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential mediating role of employee engagement between rewards and recognition and normative commitment.

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3073

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential mediating role of employee engagement between rewards and recognition and normative commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses of a sample of 176 private bank employees in India were used to examine the proposed mediated model.

Findings

The variable rewards and recognition is found to be significantly correlated to both employee engagement and normative commitment. Results of regression have been analyzed in line with the four conditions of mediation laid down by Baron and Kenny (1986). Further, SPSS macro developed by Preacher and Hayes (2004) is used to test the proposed mediation model. The relationship between rewards and recognition and normative commitment is found to become smaller after controlling the variable employee engagement. The results provide partial support to the mediation hypothesis.

Originality/value

Normative commitment has been less researched relative to the attention paid to affective commitment. Further, no research has yet focused on the impact of rewards and recognition on normative commitment, with the mediating impact of employee engagement. This study hence provides the first empirical test of the established relationship between rewards and recognition and employee engagement by introducing normative commitment as an outcome variable.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Gordon Fullerton

Limited attention has been given to the effects of normative commitment (NC) in a marketing relationship. This paper investigates the effects of service quality and…

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4460

Abstract

Purpose

Limited attention has been given to the effects of normative commitment (NC) in a marketing relationship. This paper investigates the effects of service quality and normative commitment on customer retention in a consumer-retailer relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Two distinct studies; a longitudinal experiment and a SEM model were conducted to tease out the normative commitment-service quality interaction on customer switching intentions in services.

Findings

Both studies supported the existence of a significant normative commitment-service quality interaction on switching, in addition to the main effects of both variables.

Research limitations/implications

The longitudinal experiment has the limitation of being a simple test of theory in a controlled setting. Study II validates this theory in a real-world retail services setting, but there are questions about the extent to which the relationship may hold in other service sectors. The results indicate that the effect of service quality on customer loyalty is moderated by normative commitment. This may also allow us to think about customer commitment in a new way in that it could be a construct rooted in attitude confidence rather than attitude.

Practical implications

The findings allow practitioners to recognize that the development of obligation-based normative commitment can give them a basis for successful competition against other firms, even those that may outperform them on other salient attributes, including basic service quality.

Originality/value

This is one of a very small number of studies in the discipline that have examined the effects of normative commitment and the first that has demonstrated that normative commitment moderates the service quality-service customer retention relationship. This opens the door for the possibility that other forms of commitment may moderate the relationship between service quality and customer retention.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

David Ozag

To determine the nature of the relationship between merger survivors' trust, hope, and normative and continuance commitment.

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3710

Abstract

Purpose

To determine the nature of the relationship between merger survivors' trust, hope, and normative and continuance commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Correlation and multiple regression studies.

Findings

The results indicate a statistically significant relationship between merger survivors' trust, hope, and normative commitment. The results of a correlation study indicate no significant relationship between merger survivors' trust, hope, and continuance commitment.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation evolved from the scales used to measure the relationship between the study's constructs. The scales were not isolated to measure particular aspects of merger survivors' trust, hope, nor normative and continuance organizational commitment. Also, debate exists regarding the proper time to evaluate mergers survivors' perceptions regarding the merger.

Practical implications

Trust in management can reduce perceptions of threat and harm, and facilitate constructive, goal‐determined, survivor responses. Hope can enhance merger survivors' sense that they could cope with the merger. In turn, high levels of hope produced more active responses to the merger. Active and constructive survivor responses can produce positive commitment toward the organization. Conversely, a lack of trust in management can increase perceptions of threat and harm in merger survivors. The lack of trust in certain merger survivors can facilitate destructive responses, where the merger survivors' focus is on goals outside the organization.

Originality/value

No systematic attempts to understand the relationship among the constructs has been identified.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Zhining Wang, Tao Cui and Shaohan Cai

Based on affective events theory, this study explores the cross-level effect of team reflexivity on employee innovative behaviors. Specifically, the authors examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on affective events theory, this study explores the cross-level effect of team reflexivity on employee innovative behaviors. Specifically, the authors examine the mediating effects of affective and normative commitment on this relationship, as well as the moderating effects of benevolent leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed 341 employees and their direct supervisors in 74 work units and utilized multilevel path analysis to test a model of cross-level moderated mediation.

Findings

The study analysis results suggest that team reflexivity significantly contributes to employee innovative behavior. Both affective commitment and normative commitment mediate this relationship. Benevolent leadership not only enhances the relationship between team reflexivity and affective/normative commitment, but also reinforces the linkage of team reflexivity→affective commitment→employee innovative behavior.

Practical implications

The current study suggests that organizations should invest more in promoting team reflexivity and benevolent leadership in workplace. Furthermore, managers need to develop appropriate employees training programs and pay more attention to employees' work and personal lives. They need to make efforts to enhance employees' affective and normative commitment, thereby facilitating their innovative behavior.

Originality/value

This research identifies affective commitment and normative commitment as key mediators that link team reflexivity to employee innovative behavior and reveals the moderating role of benevolent leadership in the process.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Qiansong Zhang, Jieyi Pan, Dehui Xu and Taiwen Feng

Although the importance of green supplier integration (GSI) has been recognized, the knowledge of how it can be enhanced is still limited. Using insights from transaction…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the importance of green supplier integration (GSI) has been recognized, the knowledge of how it can be enhanced is still limited. Using insights from transaction cost and resource dependence theories, this paper aims to explore how to balance coercive and non-coercive powers to enhance GSI and the mediating role of relationship commitment and the moderating role of relationship closeness.

Design/methodology/approach

To validate the hypotheses, this study conducted hierarchical regression analysis and bootstrapping using the survey data collected from 206 Chinese manufacturers.

Findings

The results indicate that coercive power undermines normative commitment, while non-coercive power promotes normative and instrumental commitments. Both normative and instrumental commitments enhance GSI. Normative commitment mediates the impacts of coercive and non-coercive powers on GSI, while instrumental commitment only mediates the impact of non-coercive power on GSI. Moreover, supplier trust and dependence negatively moderate the positive link between instrumental commitment and GSI.

Practical implications

Executives should carefully balance coercive and non-coercive powers to encourage firms to maintain good relationships with suppliers and develop common environmental values under different mediating effects of normative and instrumental commitments. However, they should also be aware that high level of trust and dependence can affect the impacts of powers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to GSI literature by opening the “black box” between power and GSI and verifying its boundary conditions.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Thomas Jønsson and Hans Jeppe Jeppesen

The purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship between perceived employee influence and organizational commitment by applying a multidimensional approach that…

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2802

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship between perceived employee influence and organizational commitment by applying a multidimensional approach that includes influence perceived to stem from the individual and the team, as well as affective and normative commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 526 out of a population of 732 employees (72 percent reply rate) from four Danish companies in different industries and with different types of teams participated in the questionnaire study.

Findings

Results of bootstrapping mediation analyses reveal that a relationship between perceived influence of the team and affective commitment is fully mediated by perceived individual influence. Results of multiple regression analyses show a positive relationship between team and individual influence, and that normative commitment moderated the relationship negatively. The results are to suggest that influence of the team may stimulate employees’ individual influence, and in turn their affective commitment, if their normative commitment is not very high.

Research limitations/implications

Generalization of the results to cultures, which are dissimilar to the Danish should be cautiously considered and further studies are needed to elucidate causality between the variables.

Originality/value

The identification of normative commitment as a variable that can potentially hinder that employees experience their teams to enhance their individual freedom elucidates the conditions that may be behind different current findings in the literature. The finding that suggests that employees need to perceive that they benefit from their team's influence in order to feel more affective committed to their organization adds to knowledge about team work's possible effects for employee attitudes.

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Tim Jones, Gavin L. Fox, Shirley F. Taylor and Leandre R. Fabrigar

This paper aims to examine the role of three forms of customer commitment (normative, affective, and continuance) on a variety of loyalty‐related customer responses.

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7572

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of three forms of customer commitment (normative, affective, and continuance) on a variety of loyalty‐related customer responses.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from two distinct sampling frames, which yielded a combined metrically invariant sample of 348 consumers. A three‐dimensional conceptualization of commitment is used to analyze impacts on one focal (i.e. repurchase intentions) and two discretionary customer responses.

Findings

Results of structural equation modeling analyses indicate that affective commitment is the primary driver of the customer responses and mediates the effects of normative and continuance commitments. These effects are contingent upon the type of service.

Research limitation/implications

This research emphasizes the primacy of affective commitment in predicting loyalty‐like customer responses.

Practical implications

Managers need to focus primarily on generating affective commitment, but be mindful that normative and continuance commitment also play a role in generating desirable consumer responses.

Originality/value

The paper builds on and overcomes several deficiencies in prior commitment research. A more accurate and useful representation of affective, normative, and continuance commitment roles in generating focal and discretionary behaviors is provided.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Sik Sumaedi, Rosa P Juniarti and I Gede Mahatma Yuda Bakti

This paper aims to examine the relationship among trust, commitment and ego involvement and their impacts on word-of-mouth communication (WOM) for individual saving…

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1264

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship among trust, commitment and ego involvement and their impacts on word-of-mouth communication (WOM) for individual saving customers in Islamic banking.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model and the hypotheses are formulated based on trust and commitment theory, organizational commitment theory, social judgment theory and the results of previous empirical studies on buyer–seller marketing relationship in business-to-customer (B2C) markets. Quantitative research methodology was performed to examine the model and the hypotheses. The data were collected using survey with questionnaire. The respondents of the survey are 100 Islamic banking individual saving customers. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the proposed model and the hypotheses.

Findings

The research results show that affective commitment has a positive and significant impact on WOM, while normative commitment and calculative commitment have no significant impact on WOM. Ego involvement has a positive and significant impact on trust, normative commitment, calculative commitment and affective commitment. However, trust does not have a significant impact on calculative commitment, normative commitment and affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

This research was only conducted in one Islamic bank in Indonesia. The data collection using the convenience sampling method as well as the use of a small sample size caused the limitation of the research results in representing across the retail customer of the bank. This study can be replicated with a larger sample size and by involving more Islamic banks to examine the stability of the findings.

Practical implications

The research results indicate that ego involvement has an important role in shaping trust and commitment of Islamic banking individual saving customers. Given this, the managements of Islamic banks need to ensure that the banks they have managed are relevant, important and appropriate with the values espoused by their individual customers.

Originality/value

This study is important because of the limited literature which discusses relationship marketing in the context of Islamic banking. Furthermore, this research has a novelty on the inclusion of ego involvement in explaining trust and commitment. The use of commitment as a multi-attribute construct also enriches the literature on buyer–seller marketing relationship in B2C markets due to the limited literature that addresses commitment as a multi-attribute construct.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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