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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2020

Raheel Yasin, Sarah Obsequio Namoco, Junaimah Jauhar, Noor Fareen Abdul Rahim and Najam Ul Zia

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which ethical climate mediates between responsible leadership and employee turnover intention.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which ethical climate mediates between responsible leadership and employee turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the deductive logic approach to develop hypotheses and analytical framework. Data were collected through convenience sampling technique from branch-level employees of the Bank of Punjab Pakistan working in Lahore, Gujranwala and Gujrat Region. Data were analyzed to test the hypotheses via descriptive analysis and structural equation modeling using SPSS and Smart PLS.

Findings

Results confirmed a significant positive association between responsible leadership and ethical climate and a negative association between ethical climate and employee turnover intention. Furthermore, results also confirmed the mediating role of ethical climate between responsible leadership and turnover intention.

Practical implications

This study enhances the existing literature regarding responsible leadership, ethical climate and turnover intention. It also helps professionals to review their policies.

Originality/value

The theoretical contribution of this paper lies in exploring the relationship between responsible leadership and ethical climate. The current study empirically examined the mediating role of an ethical climate between responsible leadership and employee turnover. It contributes also to the literature regarding responsible leadership, ethical climate and turnover intention.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Noor Fareen Abdul Rahim, Essia Ries Ahmed, Mohammad Nizam Sarkawi, Abdul Rahman Jaaffar and Jauriyah Shamsuddin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between operational risk management and customer complaints. It also determines whether product complexity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between operational risk management and customer complaints. It also determines whether product complexity moderates the relationship between the operational risk management and customer complaints.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilizes a quantitative method: quantitative data were collected using a questionnaire. The population of this study is 1,845 local conventional bank branches based in Malaysia.

Findings

The findings revealed that components of operational risk management, namely practice of hazard identification and formulation of implementation of risk control, have negative and significant relationships with customer complaints. Empirical evidence confirmed the moderating effects of product complexity on the relationship between operational risk management and customer complaints.

Originality/value

From the perspective of developing countries, the main contribution of this study is the elucidation of the effect of operational risk management on customer complaints in commercial banks in Malaysia. This study confirmed the usability of the resource-based view theory in the banking industry, as well as operational risk management as a bank resource.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Noor Fareen Abdul Rahim, Abdul Rahman Jaaffar, Mohammad Nizam Sarkawi and Jauriyah binti Shamsuddin

The change in Malaysian financial environment can be attributed to digitalization as banks are racing to digital maturity by 2020. Historically in Malaysia, the use of…

Abstract

The change in Malaysian financial environment can be attributed to digitalization as banks are racing to digital maturity by 2020. Historically in Malaysia, the use of credit card was a Fintech development in the 1950s to help Malaysians minimize the burden in carrying cash all the time. The aim of financial technology in the 1990s was to encourage bank customers to use the online banking system instead of only automated teller machine. Fintech services are swiftly interrupting banks' services globally. Similarly, Malaysia's banking sector is experiencing the interruption since as more Fintech organizations are innovating new Fintech service to improve convenience for clienteles. Numerous regulatory agencies in Malaysia and the Malaysian government have set up several initiatives to encourage and provide a vigorous growth in the Malaysian Fintech and digital asset regulatory environment. Expectation Confirmation Model, Technology Acceptance Model, and Cognitive Model are viewed as the most popular frameworks that discuss the continuous intention to use information system. The combination of these three models has led to the creation of Technology Continuance Theory (TCT). TCT postulates that five prominent constructs or antecedents are depicted as key indicators in explaining the users' intentions for continuous use: (1) confirmation, (2) perceived usefulness, (3) perceived ease of use, (4) satisfaction, and (5) attitude. Furthermore, TCT adds to the argument on the consumers' continuance adoptions by assimilating satisfaction and attitude into a single construct.

Details

Modeling Economic Growth in Contemporary Malaysia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-806-4

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Abstract

Details

Modeling Economic Growth in Contemporary Malaysia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-806-4

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