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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Zamzami Zainuddin, Corinne Jacqueline Perera, Hussein Haruna and Habiburrahim Habiburrahim

The purpose of this study is twofold. Firstly, this research aims at helping countries implement an equitable, innovative and context-appropriate stay-home game plan for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold. Firstly, this research aims at helping countries implement an equitable, innovative and context-appropriate stay-home game plan for the millions of disadvantaged and under-privileged students severely affected by the forfeiture of school closures; and secondly, this study proclaims that the burgeoning popularity of gamification has the potential to lay the bedrock foundation for ‘Literacy in the New Norm’.

Design/methodology/approach

The temporal closure of schools around the world to limit the spread of the COVID-19 has resulted in massive educational disruptions triggering adverse effects and bringing much of education under grave threat. Through a review of the current empirical and conceptual literature, this study proposes a new gamification concept in a non-technology environment.

Findings

Well underway are global dialogues that hold conversations on implementing mitigation strategies to counter the looming global health crisis. This has generated the impetus for a more concerted effort by concerned governments and international organizations to identify appropriate solutions for the continuity of learning so that the learning never stops. While educators and learners plunge further into the core of reconstructing education, the authors recognize that the fundamentals of technology and virtual connectivity have all along contributed to the multi-faceted e-learning stage set. However, concerns regarding the paradigm shift to remote online learning would certainly exacerbate inequalities cardinally felt across disadvantaged communities around the globe.

Originality/value

As the world is currently bound by strict isolation measures, learners of all ages have been relegated to the confines of their homes. For the most part, the stark realities of technological mishaps that have befallen underprivileged school children, serve as a reminder to help target children all over the world who are in most peril of losing ground in terms of continued education. It is on these grounds that the criterion set out in this article elucidates the nature and scope of a supplementary stay-home game plan detailing the use of game affordances that bear intelligently in the creation of home-based activities for parents to give it their best effort in fostering a collaborative and meaningful parent-child relationship that spawns the new language of literacy in the new norm.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Elin Kubberød, Sally Jones and Inger Beate Pettersen

The influence of gender on high-tech entrepreneurship is of growing interest worldwide, as scholars argue that women face gendered barriers specific to this field…

Abstract

Purpose

The influence of gender on high-tech entrepreneurship is of growing interest worldwide, as scholars argue that women face gendered barriers specific to this field. Although some gender-focussed research exists on the interplay of context and entrepreneurial learning, these issues have yet to be intensively studied, and the research aims to address this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws upon empirical evidence from the entrepreneurial learning of nine women opportunity entrepreneurs in the high-technology sector in Norway. It employs a qualitative phenomenological approach, with retrospective and in-depth interviews to capture and analyse the entrepreneurs' lived experiences and learning histories.

Findings

The entrepreneurs in this study highlight gendered learning experiences, leading them to make conscious and strategic decisions of both alignment and resistance to negotiate their enterprise in a highly masculine sector. Their prior learning histories of not belonging seem to underpin their preparedness for entrepreneurship in the sector. Counter to prevailing theorizing, not belonging is an enabling condition, allowing women entrepreneurs to subvert and challenge a highly masculinized context. This condition empowers them to mobilize their “otherness” to create change within their own ventures and make the rules on their own terms.

Originality/value

This interdisciplinary research deepens the understanding of the interplay between gender, entrepreneurial learning and context through the concept of belonging and extends theorization of the gendered dynamics in entrepreneurial learning histories. The paper proposes a framework of gendered entrepreneurial learning in a masculinized industry context, which highlights important implications for future gender and entrepreneurial learning research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2017

Matt Bower

This chapter provides a comprehensive review of research and developments relating to the use of Web 2.0 technologies in education. As opposed to early educational uses of…

Abstract

This chapter provides a comprehensive review of research and developments relating to the use of Web 2.0 technologies in education. As opposed to early educational uses of the Internet involving publication of static information on web pages, Web 2.0 tools offer a host of opportunities for educators to provide more interactive, collaborative, and creative online learning experiences for students. The chapter starts by defining Web 2.0 tools in terms of their ability to facilitate online creation, editing, and sharing of web content. A typology of Web 2.0 technologies is presented to illustrate the wide variety of tools at teachers’ disposal. Educational uses of Web 2.0 technologies such as wikis, blogs, and microblogging are explored, in order to showcase the variety of designs that can be utilized. Based on a review of the research literature the educational benefits of using Web 2.0 technologies are outlined, including their ability to facilitate communication, collaborative knowledge building, student-centered activity, and vicarious learning. Similarly, issues surrounding the use of Web 2.0 tools are distilled from the literature and discussed, such as the possibility of technical problems, collaboration difficulties, and plagiarism. Two case studies involving the use Web 2.0 tools to support personalized learning and small group collaboration are detailed to exemplify design possibilities in greater detail. Finally, design recommendations for learning and teaching using Web 2.0 are presented, again based on findings from the research literature.

Details

Design of Technology-Enhanced Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-183-4

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Paul S. Vincett and Steve Farlow

There is wide consensus on the importance of experiential entrepreneurship education. The purpose of this article is to investigate whether two unconventional experiential…

Abstract

Purpose

There is wide consensus on the importance of experiential entrepreneurship education. The purpose of this article is to investigate whether two unconventional experiential courses, with the style and content that the authors would like to have experienced before becoming entrepreneurs, can be successfully grafted on to the more conventional offerings of a large university business school.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors create learning by allowing a small group of students with serious business ideas to actually be entrepreneurs (rather than pretending to be) as they evaluate, optimize, and start running their businesses within the university course structure. All distractions from these goals, such as formal business plans and academic exercises, are removed, and direct contact with outside stakeholders is strongly emphasized. Fellow‐students and the instructor provide constant feedback and ideas to adapt and improve the businesses.

Findings

The courses meet a variety of accepted experiential education criteria, receive highly positive student evaluations, and generate many real businesses.

Practical implications

The methodology provides a practical, scalable, and effective way to provide university education through entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

The approach described in the paper has many unusual aspects and works very well. It may be of interest to others attempting innovations in the teaching of entrepreneurship and of the enterprising mindset.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Juliane Jarke

The purpose of this paper is to review interventions/methods for engaging older adults in meaningful digital public service design by enabling them to engage critically…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review interventions/methods for engaging older adults in meaningful digital public service design by enabling them to engage critically and productively with open data and civic tech.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper evaluates data walks as a method for engaging non-tech-savvy citizens in co-design work. These were evaluated along a framework considering how such interventions allow for sharing control (e.g. over design decisions), sharing expertise and enabling change.

Findings

Within a co-creation project, different types of data walks may be conducted, including ideation walks, data co-creation walks or user test walks. These complement each other with respect to how they facilitate the sharing of control and expertise, and enable change for a variety of older citizens.

Practical implications

Data walks are a method with a low-threshold, potentially enabling a variety of citizens to engage in co-design activities relating to open government and civic tech.

Social implications

Such methods address the digital divide and further social participation of non-tech-savvy citizens. They value the resources and expertise of older adults as co-designers and partners, and counter stereotypical ideas about age and ageing.

Originality/value

This pilot study demonstrates how data walks can be incorporated into larger co-creation projects.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Mark Bilandzic and Marcus Foth

This paper aims to inform design strategies for smart space technology to enhance libraries as environments for coworking and informal social learning. The focus is on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to inform design strategies for smart space technology to enhance libraries as environments for coworking and informal social learning. The focus is on understanding user motivations, behaviour, and activities in the library when there is no programmed agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyses gathered data over five months of ethnographic research at The Edge – a “bookless” library space at the State Library of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, that is explicitly dedicated to coworking, social learning, peer collaboration, and creativity around digital culture and technology.

Findings

The results present five personas that embody people's main usage patterns as well as motivations, attitudes, and perceived barriers to social learning. It appears that most users work individually or within pre‐organised groups, but usually do not make new connections with co‐present, unacquainted users. Based on the personas, four hybrid design dimensions are suggested to improve the library as a social interface for shared learning encounters across physical and digital spaces.

Originality/value

The findings in this paper offer actionable knowledge for managers, decision makers, and designers of technology‐enhanced library spaces and similar collaboration and coworking spaces.

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Anya Evmenova

Inclusive education is gaining momentum across the globe. Various types of technology offer necessary supports for students with disabilities in order to access and…

Abstract

Inclusive education is gaining momentum across the globe. Various types of technology offer necessary supports for students with disabilities in order to access and succeed in general education. This chapter focusses on the implementation of assistive and mainstream technology in inclusive classrooms. The importance of assistive technology (AT) services is discussed. Factors such as coordination and collaboration between service providers, situated training, technology integration with fidelity, and data-driven decision-making are imperative for effective implementation. Several models and resources for AT implementation are presented along with how they offer guidance to general and special education teachers as well as related service providers. Despite some barriers to technology use in inclusive settings, educators should strive to overcome fears and existing challenges in an effort to provide better learning opportunities to all students, including those with unique abilities and needs.

Details

Assistive Technology to Support Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-520-7

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Anthony Larsson

This paper aims to study the definition and formation of Skunk Works and how it may present itself as a viable theoretical alternative to other mainstream concepts of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the definition and formation of Skunk Works and how it may present itself as a viable theoretical alternative to other mainstream concepts of collective/corporate entrepreneurships, while dissecting some of the prevalent misconceptions of the extant literature regarding the application of Skunk Works.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a literature-based conceptual study that compares and differentiates various forms of group entrepreneurships as discussed in the academic debate.

Findings

This study shows how Skunk Works differs from other forms of collective/corporate entrepreneurship through its seven dimensions (isolation, customer needs, focus, planning, trusted project manager, cross-functional teams and leveraging overlaps) while challenging the dominant extant contenders of collective/corporate entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

Skunk Works remains a sustainable form of entrepreneurship, and it is still viable to consider it as a practical construct for smaller as well as larger organisations as a means of solving complicated innovative tasks requiring a multidisciplinary team with expert competence in a relatively quicker period of time.

Social implications

Organisations may take greater initiatives towards assembling entrepreneurial teams in the Skunk Work tradition.

Originality/value

As a means of understanding collective/corporate entrepreneurship, this study dissects some of the original fundamental cornerstones of Skunk Works entrepreneurship in an effort to present it as a viable alternative construct to the dominant construct of entrepreneurial orientation as well as other extant constructs.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Yi Ding and Kai‐Hin Chai

Based on associative network theory and a service systems perspective, this study aims to investigate the spillover effects of quality and customer satisfaction between…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on associative network theory and a service systems perspective, this study aims to investigate the spillover effects of quality and customer satisfaction between products and services and, in particular, the role of customer expertise in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Overall, 457 valid responses were collected through a questionnaire survey. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Empirical support was found for spillover effects. For tech‐savvy users, spillover from network service quality has a positive impact on the formation of satisfaction with handsets; however, for non‐tech‐savvy users, spillovers only occur between satisfaction and loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has extended understanding of the relationships between quality, satisfaction, and loyalty in a multi‐context setting. Future research could study spillovers longitudinally and examine such effects in other emerging mobile contexts.

Practical implications

Managing quality and satisfaction is increasingly complex given that customers are seeking for a holistic experience. Measurement based on pure‐product or pure‐service should be improved by taking a more systematic approach. Mobile phones render people unprecedented connections with the world, thus transforming every aspect of the society. A reorientation to the user and their use contexts can contribute to better mobile communication experiences.

Originality/value

This study views the product and service as part of a service system that holistically delivers value‐in‐use. Furthermore, the role of customers as resource integrators is recognized by including their knowledge as an input for need fulfilment.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Clare Gately and James Cunningham

Business plan writing seems the panacea to gain stakeholder legitimacy and financial backing. Our chapter explores the contributions and disconnections between business…

Abstract

Business plan writing seems the panacea to gain stakeholder legitimacy and financial backing. Our chapter explores the contributions and disconnections between business plan writing and the start-up process for incubated technology entrepreneurs. The study is set in the South East Enterprise Platform Programme (SEEPP), an incubator programme for technology graduate entrepreneurs in the South East of Ireland. Using a purposive sample of technology entrepreneurs in start-up mode, we took a qualitative approach consisting of content analysis of 40 business plans and in-depth interviews with 25 technology entrepreneurs. Our research found that writing a detailed business plan constrains the technology entrepreneur’s natural penchant for action, compelling them to focus on business plan writing rather than enactment. Technology entrepreneurs favour a market-led rather than funding-led operational level document to plan, and learn from, near-term activities using milestones.

Details

Academic Entrepreneurship: Creating an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-984-3

Keywords

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