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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Michele Abendstern, Rowan Jasper, Nik Loynes, Jane Hughes, Caroline Sutcliffe and David Challis

The purpose of this paper is to provide new insights into the contribution and experiences of non-statutory sector (voluntary) services delivering care coordination.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide new insights into the contribution and experiences of non-statutory sector (voluntary) services delivering care coordination.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study, based on face-to-face semi-structured interviews with 17 managers from a range of non-statutory sector services, used thematic data analysis supported by a framework approach.

Findings

Four themes emerged: commissioning arrangements undermined non-statutory sector development; working relationships between statutory and non-statutory services required time and energy to navigate and sustain; the establishment of a niche role in the larger network of provision; and tensions relating to future developments. The non-statutory sector was found to provide a mix of services, including specialist provision targeting specific communities that complemented or substituted for those provided by the state. Managers wanted their services to be recognised by the statutory sector as equal partners in the delivery of care coordination and were also keen to retain their independence.

Practical implications

Findings provide information for service commissioners and managers from statutory and non-statutory sectors indicating a complex set of experiences and views regarding the role of the latter. This is particularly salient in a political landscape which has increasing expectations of their involvement in the provision of care coordination.

Originality/value

This study considers the work of the non-statutory sector in the delivery of care coordination to adults and older people, an area under-reported to date. It suggests that there are opportunities available for these services to become embedded within a wider social care system and to excel by retaining or developing specialist roles and services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 24 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Rowan Jasper, Jane Hughes, Caroline Sutcliffe, Michele Abendstern, Niklas Loynes and David Challis

The provision of information and advice for older people arranging their own care is a policy objective. The purpose of this paper is to explore the range and scope of…

Abstract

Purpose

The provision of information and advice for older people arranging their own care is a policy objective. The purpose of this paper is to explore the range and scope of web-based information about care coordination activities for older people in the non-statutory sector in England.

Design/methodology/approach

Non-statutory organisations were identified through a structured internet search. Services were screened to identify those providing at least one care coordination activity. A postal survey of services was conducted in 2014 and results compared with the initial findings of the web search.

Findings

Almost 300 services were identified, most of which were provided by three organisations: Age UK; Alzheimer’s Society; and the British Red Cross. Brokerage was the most frequently reported care coordination activity; the majority of services focussed on help to stay at home; and carers and older people (including those with dementia) were the target groups most often identified. Comparison of the two information sources revealed a significant agreement between two care coordination’s activities: compiling support plans and monitoring and review.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are based on a purposive sample of organisations and therefore care must be exercised in generalising from them.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to systematically explore the nature and extent of information about care coordination activities provided by the non-statutory sector in England. It was conducted when policy advocated both an increased role for the non-statutory sector and an increase in self-directed support.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Madeline Naick

The provision of telecare for older adults in England is increasingly being facilitated by care navigators in the non-statutory sector. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The provision of telecare for older adults in England is increasingly being facilitated by care navigators in the non-statutory sector. The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of care navigators when assessing older adults for telecare and to understand what contextual and organisational factors impact on their practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposeful sample of care navigators and telecare installers was selected. Care navigators were recruited from five non-statutory organisations. In order to provide an insight into telecare provision by this sector, telecare installers were also recruited. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 participants covering: role, training, assessment, reviews, installation, suitability, impact, aims, outcomes, and organisational structure. Interview data were analysed using the framework approach.

Findings

Five main themes emerged from the analysis: responsiveness, autonomy, knowledge exchange, evolving practice, and sustaining performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study included a small sample, and was only based in one local authority, focusing on the experience of care navigators in only one sector.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that strategic placement of care navigators could support the demand for telecare assessment to facilitate discharges from hospital. This study highlights the perception of home assessment as a gold standard of practice for care navigators. In order to develop a more sustainable model for care navigators’ capacity to work within hospital teams and provide home assessments needs further consideration.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to explore the role of the care navigator and their involvement in the provision of telecare for older adults.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Dawn Mc Dowell, Una McMahon-Beattie and Amy Burns

The purpose of this paper is to consider the importance of structured and consistent practical cookery skills intervention in the 11-14-year age group. This paper reviews…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the importance of structured and consistent practical cookery skills intervention in the 11-14-year age group. This paper reviews the impact and development of statutory and non-statutory cooking skills interventions in the UK and considers limitations in relation to life skills training. Currently practical cooking skills are mainly derived from two sources namely the non-statutory sector (community cooking interventions) and the statutory sector (Home Economics teaching).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper compares the two interventions in terms of effective long-term outcomes. Non-statutory cooking interventions are generally lottery funded and therefore tend to be single teaching blocks of, on average, six to eight weeks targeting mostly low-income adults and the literature emphasises a deficit of empirical measurement of the long-term impact. In contrast Home Economics classes offer a structured learning environment across genders and socio-economic groups. In addition it is taught over a substantial time frame to facilitate a process of practical skills development (with relevant theoretical teaching), reflection, group communication and consolidation, where according to current educational theory (Kolb, 1984) learning is more thoroughly embedded with the increased potential for longer term impact.

Findings

The review identifies the limitations of too many community initiatives or “project-itis” (Caraher, 2012, p. 10) and instead supports the use of the school curriculum to best maximise the learning of practical cooking skills.

Originality/value

This review will be of particular value to educationalists and health policy decision makers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2008

Terry O'Brien and Helen Hayden

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview and analysis of current legislation and various schemes and practices that are available to employers and employees in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview and analysis of current legislation and various schemes and practices that are available to employers and employees in relation to work life balance, family friendly work arrangements, leave entitlements and diverse modes of flexible work in Ireland. Focuses in particular on the Library and Information sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces the concept of flexible working, followed by a review of relevant literature. Outlines what flexible work practices are, giving details of various types of flexible working, both statutory and non‐statutory (in Ireland). Then, discusses why flexible work practices have emerged and details background legislation and the issues that the introduction of flexible working raises. Draws conclusions about best practice in relation to the management of flexible work practices.

Findings

It is argued that commitment to work life balance is now firmly in the mainstream and is part of the political agenda in Ireland and the rest of the developed world. Flexibility in work practice is becoming an integral part of employment, particularly in public sector organisations, which are in effect, leading the way on this issue. Flexible work practices have many advantages for both employees and employers. They also create challenges, especially in terms of management. It is important to balance the requirements of the organisation with those of the employees. Key factors in the successful implementation of flexible working are training and communication.

Originality/value

The article provides a firm basis for further investigation and discussion.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Axel Hauser‐Ditz, Markus Hertwig and Ludger Pries

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the distribution and the contextual conditions of statutory and non‐statutory forms of employee representation in Germany (works…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the distribution and the contextual conditions of statutory and non‐statutory forms of employee representation in Germany (works councils and non‐statutory employee representation (NSRs) respectively). It aims to contribute to the debate by proposing a theoretical model which improves our understanding of why works councils and NSRs exist in companies and by presenting an empirical analysis of the explanatory factors based on representative data.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a representative survey of 3,254 German private‐sector companies, descriptive statistics and regression models are calculated in order to identify the contextual conditions which promote or prevent the establishment of the different forms of employee representation.

Findings

The data show that the distribution of works councils and NSRs differs considerably between industries. Works councils are more likely to be found in large and relatively old traditional‐sector companies with a high union density, while NSRs have a stronghold in (new) service sectors and smaller companies. NSRs are also more likely to be found in companies where management has a positive attitude towards employee involvement.

Research limitations/implications

Although case studies indicate that there is a huge variety of NSRs, this study could only use a relatively broad category. Future survey research should analyse the various types of NSRs and works councils.

Social implications

Works councils are still the main form of employee representation and the German model of industrial relations appears to be stable in terms of firm‐level employee representation. However, with new service sectors becoming increasingly important (due to socio‐economic development), this model may be in jeopardy.

Originality/value

This paper extends previous research on the distribution and contextual conditions of works councils by providing a comprehensive analysis of works councils and NSRs, based on a representative survey that includes a variety of variables which have strong effects, but have not previously been examined in other studies.

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Jem Bendell, Anthony Miller and Katharina Wortmann

This paper seeks to provide an overview and context for the emerging field of public policies for scaling voluntary standards, or private regulations, on the social and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an overview and context for the emerging field of public policies for scaling voluntary standards, or private regulations, on the social and environmental performance of business and finance, to promote sustainable development; in order to stimulate more innovation and research in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the approach of a literature review of texts from intergovernmental and non‐governmental organisations, to develop a synthesis of issues, before literature review from management studies, development studies and international relations, to revise the synthesis and identify policy relevant future research.

Findings

Governance at all levels but particularly the international level involves corporations and their stakeholders. Together they have created non‐statutory corporate social responsibility (CSR) standards which now influence significant amounts of international trade and investment, thereby presenting new benefits, risks and challenges for sustainable development. Governments around the world are now innovating public policies on these standards, which can be categorised to inform policy development: governments prepare, prefer, promote and prescribe CSR standards. Therefore, a new dimension to collaborative governance is emerging and would benefit from research and technical assistance. As concepts and practices of regulation and governance are moving beyond state versus non‐state, mandatory versus voluntary approaches, so issues about transparency, accountability and democratic participation remain important for any new manifestation of regulation or governance.

Originality/value

By contextualising public policy innovations on CSR standards within new theories of governance, including “private regulation” and “collaborative governance”, the paper helps to clarify a new agenda for policy making and related research.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

W. Loretto, C. Duncan and P.J. White

Considers a neglected aspect of UK industrial relations. The effectiveness of earlier codes of practice is assessed according to various criteria: a thorough creative…

Abstract

Considers a neglected aspect of UK industrial relations. The effectiveness of earlier codes of practice is assessed according to various criteria: a thorough creative process; a high degree of consensus; and supporting institutions. These criteria are then used to gauge the potential impact of the 1999 Code on Age Diversity. The code’s non‐statutory basis is considered to have drawbacks which outweigh the merits. In consequence, it is contended that the code’s impact is likely to be small.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Hing Fung Leung

To study the nature of covenants for planning control from a legal perspective; to examine the legal mechanisms by which different parties may be bound by covenants and to…

Abstract

Purpose

To study the nature of covenants for planning control from a legal perspective; to examine the legal mechanisms by which different parties may be bound by covenants and to illustrate the better legal meaning for the idea of “planning by contract”.

Design/methodology/approach

The legal principles in Hong Kong relating to how land covenants may affect land owners are used in analyzing the concept of “planning by contract”, which conveys a meaning of an origin from the concept of privity of contract. Examples by reference to real life cases are used to illustrate how planning control through covenants has affected land owners.

Findings

Covenants relating to planning control in land leases affect not only the original government lessees but also all subsequent owners to the land. The operation of planning control through covenants is more than a concept based on operation of contract.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis is largely based on the law in Hong Kong. The extent to which the analysis may apply elsewhere is a matter depending on the legal framework in the operation of land covenants at different places.

Practical implications

Land owners and facility managers should fully understand the mechanism by which land covenants may bind land owners even if they have never agreed to the covenants and that the development potential of the property may be seriously affected.

Originality/value

This paper will serve as an aid to land owners and facility managers to understand the mechanism by which land covenants may affect the land and its development potential.

Details

Facilities, vol. 24 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2015

Yukiko Konno

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors influencing defaults and exits from public works by prime contractors of small and medium-sized enterprises in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors influencing defaults and exits from public works by prime contractors of small and medium-sized enterprises in the Japanese construction industry. By analysing the data for several years as panel data, this study determines the extent of influence of changes in company characteristics on the defaults and exits.

Design/methodology/approach

Using construction company evaluation (Keiei Jikou Sinsa or Keisin) data and by employing the panel binary logit random effect model, this study empirically analyses the construction industry.

Findings

This study shows that defaulting and exiting companies have different characteristics. The result shows financial performance indicators, non-financial performance indicators and Keisin scores to significantly affect defaults and exits. In particular, this study finds non-financial performance indicators, such as whether a firm draws insurance, to significantly affect its likelihood to default or exit and the influence varies on the basis of insurance type.

Originality/value

The feature of this study is that its analysis focuses not only on defaulting companies but also on exiting companies, defined as those that stop operating as prime contractors for public works but otherwise stay in business. In contrast to existing research, this study distinguishes between defaults and exits and analyses the factors that influence a firm following one of these two outcomes. Moreover, although Keisin data are usually used to determine whether companies qualify to enter bids for public works, they can be applied for an attribution analysis of corporate defaults and exits.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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