Search results

1 – 4 of 4
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Wen Zheng, Senarath Dharmasena, Oral Capps Jr and Ramkumar Janakiraman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting consumer demand for and the effects on tax on sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting consumer demand for and the effects on tax on sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Using nationally representative data from 62,092 households and tobit econometric procedure, conditional and unconditional factors affecting the demand for sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water were estimated.

Findings

The own-price elasticity of demand for sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water is −0.664 and −0.229, respectively. Coffee, fruit drinks, whole milk and tea are substitutes for non-sparking bottled water. Non-sparking bottled water, coffee, fruit drinks and whole milk are substitutes for sparking bottled water. Household income, race, region and presence of children significantly affect the demand for bottled water. A 10 percent increase in price due to a tax on bottled water decreased plastic use by 50 grams per household per year. This is equivalent to saving 9.5m pounds of plastic annually.

Research limitations/implications

Data used in this analysis only captured at-home consumption of bottled water by US households. While tax on bottled water may reduce the consumption of bottled water, it may increase the consumption of competitive beverages such as carbonated soft drinks or fruit drinks. Although the use of plastic with regards to water bottles may go down as a result of the tax, the plastic consumption could go up with regards to consumers’ increased purchase of other beverages. This might contribute net increase plastic bottle consumption, undermining the effects of a bottled water tax.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to look at demand and tax aspects with regards to disaggregated bottled water products.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1935

The manufacturer who produces superior products is continually being confronted with the problem of how he can carry conviction to potential purchasers as to the superior…

Abstract

The manufacturer who produces superior products is continually being confronted with the problem of how he can carry conviction to potential purchasers as to the superior quality of his products—a problem which is becoming increasingly difficult. In the present day something stronger than personal asseverations by a firm is required, in order to carry conviction, and independent scientific corroboration as to the quality of a product affords the only solution. The System of Independent Analytical Control and Approval was instituted in this country nearly forty years ago by the British Analytical Control, and the Gold Seal of Approval issued by the British Analytical Control is intended to afford authentic independent evidence in regard to the quality of a product, since it indicates that any product to which it has been affixed is Approved and periodically examined by an independent Scientific Staff consisting of well‐known Public Analysts. The System enables manufacturers and vendors of pure and high‐class products to submit those products to scientific examination, permanently applied, and carried out by an independent Consulting Scientific Staff of the highest standing. The approved products are thus placed before the public with authentic testimony as to their quality. A firm desiring to place an article with the British Analytical Control, Ltd., submits three samples of the article for scientific examination. The samples must be submitted in the unopened original packages, which must be properly labelled and securely sealed. If the results of the scientific examinations show that the composition and characters of the article are such as to justify the conclusion that it is pure, genuine and good in the strictest sense of those terms, the article is approved. A Certificate of Approval is issued upon those products or articles which are approved by the British Analytical Control, and the manufacturers or proprietors of such articles are entitled to use the Gold Seal, Official Label and Certificate of the British Analytical Control in connection with the products so approved. The officers of the British Analytical Control, Ltd., at irregular intervals procure samples of the articles upon which a certificate of approval has been issued, for scientific examination and for the purpose of comparison with the original samples.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Susan Cholette

This article compares the state of the French and Californian wine industries from a business perspective, through a broad survey of recent academic and popular press…

Abstract

This article compares the state of the French and Californian wine industries from a business perspective, through a broad survey of recent academic and popular press articles. Although these two wine regions may seem disparate, commonalities (including potential business opportunities and threats) make the comparison relevant. Facets of supply and demand are analyzed, and respective production and distribution regulations are summarized. Several predictions for the future are presented, with suggestions on how to best leverage these trends. Demands will rise as the economic downturn abates and overall non‐cyclic market expansion continues. Segmentation will play an even more important role in how suppliers target their offerings, as will changes within distribution and wine retailing. Regional shares of the domestic and export markets will shift as globalization of the sector, including international mergers and partnerships, continues. In conclusion, suppliers from both regions can take advantage of current conditions and future trends to produce and market wines in a business‐savvy manner.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Johan Bruwer, Vladimir Jiranek, Lulie Halstead and Anthony Saliba

The purpose of this paper is to provide clearer insights into and identify the key consumer behaviour metrics of the lower alcohol category (<11 per cent ABV) in the UK…

Downloads
1325

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide clearer insights into and identify the key consumer behaviour metrics of the lower alcohol category (<11 per cent ABV) in the UK wine market.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via an online survey from a sample size of 598 regular UK wine drinkers. To operationalise the study, five research questions were formulated. A highly structured quantitatively directed questionnaire was designed to find the answers to the research questions.

Findings

Barriers to a larger uptake of the product category included non-availability of the products, lower quality perceptions, taste issues, lack of awareness, lack of alcohol's “feel effect” and absence of a lower alcohol drinking occasion. Many UK consumers are not yet convinced how/if lower alcohol wine fits into their wine drinking occasions. The lower ABV wine buyer's main profile characteristics are weighted towards females, Millennial and Baby Boomer age generations, mostly mid to low income, who drink mainly white and rosé wines. Lower alcohol on its own is not seen as a big benefit, thus lower ABV wines should be more creatively communicated to sell the benefits.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the knowledge base in that it is the first to investigate consumer behaviour metrics as regards lower ABV wine in one of the world's leading markets, in the process providing some important baseline research information on this category. As such it is of value to academic researchers and practitioners alike.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 4 of 4