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Book part
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Lisa D. Morrison

This chapter seeks to contribute to a better understanding of Non-Profit Organizations (NPOs) use of practices for the purpose of organizational sustainability by…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter seeks to contribute to a better understanding of Non-Profit Organizations (NPOs) use of practices for the purpose of organizational sustainability by highlighting the need for conducive performance measures and standards attached to NPO funding sources.

Methodology/approach

A review of literature for the UK Non-profit organization sector and NPO performance measures. The review structures literature as it relates to the non-profit sector and their relation to societal impact of human social service (HSS) non-profit organizations, non-profit performance measures, and processes of knowledge sharing in application of organizational evaluation.

Findings

This chapter provides a review of gaps in the literature referring suitable performance measurement and assessments suitable for the unique culture and approaches to performance measures of non-profit organizations. Future research implications suggest research in order to comprehend processes and procedures of performance measures inclusive of knowledge sharing and the processes of how non-profit learn, share, and evaluate internal and external to the NPO sector.

Originality/value

The value of this chapter is relevant for the public, government, and corporations to support efficient and effective ways in appropriating funds and defining successful NPO’s for external funders to invest.

Details

Governance and Performance in Public and Non-Profit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-107-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Melissa Conley Tyler

This paper aims to examine the use of benchmarking as a management technique in the Australian non‐profit sector. Benchmarking has great potential benefit for the…

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5294

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the use of benchmarking as a management technique in the Australian non‐profit sector. Benchmarking has great potential benefit for the non‐profit sector, particularly given the reliance of non‐profit enterprises on effectively utilizing human capital; thus it might be expected that they would be enthusiastic about techniques such as benchmarking that can assist them in improving their performance. The non‐profit sector is a large and important part of the economy in the developed world.

Design/methodology/approach

To determine the use of benchmarking in the Australian non‐profit sector, the following methods were used: a review of published industry surveys and case studies; interviews with 15 non‐profit sector experts; and a review of more than 50 works on non‐profit management.

Findings

Research showed that benchmarking has been little used by non‐profit organizations in Australia to date. This seems to mirror the experience of non‐profits in other countries.

Research limitations/implications

The paper argues that the limited use of benchmarking in the non‐profit sector can be explained by: non‐profit management culture; lack of industry and funder pressure; and a lack of targeted information on benchmarking for the non‐profit sector. Any efforts to increase the use of benchmarking in the sector would need to ensure that these issues are overcome.

Practical implications

A plan of action is suggested for promoting benchmarking to non‐profit organizations.

Originality/value

The paper assesses the use of a standard management technique in the emerging area of non‐profit management. It should be of interest to those researching or managing in the Australian non‐profit sector. The paper may also be of interest to the non‐profit sector or human capital sector in other countries.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Helmut K. Anheier, Stefan Toepler and S. Wojciech Sokolowski

While the state dependency thesis seems widely accepted among students of the German non‐profit sector, there is surprisingly little research that has systematically…

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3676

Abstract

While the state dependency thesis seems widely accepted among students of the German non‐profit sector, there is surprisingly little research that has systematically explored its empirical base and conceptual validity. Attempts to remedy this situation and offers an initial empirical examination of this thesis. Examines the extent and pattern of state funding of the German non‐profit sector and develops three propositions, each adopting a different explanatory focus, which are then analysed with the help of data taken from a sample survey of West German non‐profit organizations.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Book part
Publication date: 11 September 2012

Chiara Paola Donegani, Stephen McKay and Domenico Moro

Research has long shown that employees working for non-profit organisations report a higher level of job satisfaction than workers in other sectors. This chapter…

Abstract

Research has long shown that employees working for non-profit organisations report a higher level of job satisfaction than workers in other sectors. This chapter investigates trends in job satisfaction using longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Survey (1992–2008/2009), through models which contain detailed information on individual, job and organisational characteristics. We use fixed-effects ordered-logit models to investigate job satisfaction taking account of our panel structure and the nature of the job satisfaction dependent variable. The results suggest an important, non-profit premium in job satisfaction which, contradicting the apparent bivariate evidence, is not changing over time (in appropriate models) – the warm glow of higher job satisfaction remains.

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Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory and Labor-Managed Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-221-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Shamima Ahmed

Aims to focus on non‐profit leadership and use information from advertised job announcements, in the USA, of non‐profit CEO positions to identify required competencies and…

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3540

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to focus on non‐profit leadership and use information from advertised job announcements, in the USA, of non‐profit CEO positions to identify required competencies and job duties. The objective is to assess their relevancy and adequacy in dealing with the current challenges of the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Uses content analysis to analyze CEO job advertisements that were posted in The Nonprofit Times during the 1999‐2004‐time period.

Findings

Among those who list educational requirement, a predominant majority requires degree in academic areas related to the non‐profit sector. The bias to emulate the private sector's competencies, a source of the identity crisis of this sector, is not found in the educational requirement. Fundraising experience is the most common area of requirement under experiences. Fundraising is also listed as the major job duty.

Research limitations/implications

The sizes and life cycle stages of the non‐profit agencies are not incorporated. Future research could incorporate the above variables.

Practical implications

Design training using the findings to prepare future leaders. One of the findings suggests that non‐profits are not emphasizing the value of ethics in their search for executives. Considering the importance of this value in maintaining accountability, academicians could emphasize more of this as they design different non‐profit courses.

Originality/value

Assesses the adequacy of the currently emphasized competencies in leadership to deal with the current challenges of the sector (accountability, fiscal, competition, identity crisis etc.) and their implications.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Paolo Andrei, Federica Balluchi and Katia Furlotti

In current economic systems, the role played by non-profit and voluntary organisations is relevant. Several studies analyse the development of these organisations and…

Abstract

In current economic systems, the role played by non-profit and voluntary organisations is relevant. Several studies analyse the development of these organisations and suggest reasons related to the dissemination of policies that first consider public intervention and then ‘the third way’ of the economy as a way to increase wealth and support economic development. In this context, it should be noted that:

  • Modern non-profit organisations (NPOs) take the form of enterprises encouraging the development of capabilities to satisfy human needs in terms of production of goods and utilities.

  • A systematic cooperation with the local context (i.e. enterprises and Public Administration) is becoming increasingly more important for the survival and development of NPOs.

  • Excellent opportunities for economic and social growth and for mutual development can develop from this type of cooperation.

  • Starting from this premise, the purpose of the research is to suggest some insight on the theme of cooperation between for-profit and non-profit world in the light of the thought of Church’s Social Doctrine, and in particular, of the Encyclical Letter of Benedict XVI, Caritas in VeritateOn Integral Human Development in Charity and Truth. In this sense, the contribution is a conceptual work; the study could improve with empirical research concerning the level of diffusion and the form of collaborations for-profit/non-profit in the Italian context.

Modern non-profit organisations (NPOs) take the form of enterprises encouraging the development of capabilities to satisfy human needs in terms of production of goods and utilities.

A systematic cooperation with the local context (i.e. enterprises and Public Administration) is becoming increasingly more important for the survival and development of NPOs.

Excellent opportunities for economic and social growth and for mutual development can develop from this type of cooperation.

Starting from this premise, the purpose of the research is to suggest some insight on the theme of cooperation between for-profit and non-profit world in the light of the thought of Church’s Social Doctrine, and in particular, of the Encyclical Letter of Benedict XVI, Caritas in VeritateOn Integral Human Development in Charity and Truth. In this sense, the contribution is a conceptual work; the study could improve with empirical research concerning the level of diffusion and the form of collaborations for-profit/non-profit in the Italian context.

From a methodological point of view, after a literature review on NPOs and corporate social responsibility, the chapter analyses reasons, strategies and tools of collaborations between non-profit and for-profit worlds (the role of Public Administration and hybrid organisation is excluded). Then, focus moves up on Church’s Social Doctrine and Encyclical Letter Caritas in Veritate with particular attention to the topic analysed in this chapter (collaboration for-profit/non-profit enterprises). The vision emerging from the Encyclical is that the dichotomy between for-profit and NPOs should be resolved by striving for the development of a ‘civil economy’ with the capacity to promote the overall development of the human being. The research highlights the importance of dissemination of initiatives promoted predominantly by NPOs, with the objective of stimulating and supporting the implementation of forms of structured collaboration; we are sure that a ‘connection point’ between for-profit and non-profit is now necessary.

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Hybridity in the Governance and Delivery of Public Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-769-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Jaclyn Schede Piatak

The purpose of this paper is to examine the behavioural consequences of public service motivation (PSM) and how motivation relates to an individual’s call to serve both…

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1832

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the behavioural consequences of public service motivation (PSM) and how motivation relates to an individual’s call to serve both inside and outside of the workplace. More specifically, this study examines whether and how PSM relates to prosocial behaviours – volunteering and giving – and career ambitions to work in the government or non-profit sector among public affair graduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

Logistic regression is used to examine the PSM link using a composite of the 40-item scale, each of the six dimensions – commitment to the public interest, civic duty, social justice, attraction to policymaking, compassion, and self-sacrifice – and the five-item scale from the Merit Principles Survey. The analyses draw upon data from a unique online survey of 122 graduate students in Master of Public Administration and Master of Public Policy programmes.

Findings

The results indicate that people with higher levels of PSM are more likely to want to work in public service and volunteer. However, mixed results were found for the relationship between PSM and giving charitable donations and career ambitions to work in government and no link was found for career ambitions to work in the non-profit sector.

Originality/value

This paper answers calls to examine the dimensions of PSM and examines Perry’s (1996) original conception. The results provide practical implications for human resource managers as well as non-profit and public managers in recruiting and retaining employees and volunteers.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Laura Cousins

Most studies of marketing planning focus on the private sector. Astudy of marketing planning in 79 organisations in the UK public sectorand non‐profit sectors, part of a…

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5974

Abstract

Most studies of marketing planning focus on the private sector. A study of marketing planning in 79 organisations in the UK public sector and non‐profit sectors, part of a larger study of marketing planning in the UK, is reported on. Trading public sector organisations were significantly more likely to produce an annual marketing plan than companies in the private sector, while organisations in the non‐profit sector were about as likely to do so as companies in the commercial sector. The public sector plans were broadly similar to those of private sector firms while the non‐profit plans showed a different orientation. Despite these differences, the main overall finding is that in neither the private sector nor in the public or non‐profit sectors are comprehensive plans the norm.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Elizabeth Thach and Karen J. Thompson

The purpose of this paper is to identify differences, if any, that exist in leadership style, behaviors, and competencies to drive performance between public/non‐profit

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8431

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify differences, if any, that exist in leadership style, behaviors, and competencies to drive performance between public/non‐profit and for‐profit organizational leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The study describes the results of in‐depth interviews with leaders in small to medium‐sized organizations in California. Approximately half of the leaders work in non‐profit and public organizations, while the other half work in for‐profit companies.

Findings

The findings reveal both similarities and differences between the two groups.

Originality/value

The results are a first step in examining the key leadership competencies required for success in each sector and serve as a springboard for future research.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Irina Krasnopolskaya and Lucas Meijs

This paper explores the factors that are associated with a capacity of non-profits to develop social innovations (SIs). The purpose of this paper is to examine factors in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the factors that are associated with a capacity of non-profits to develop social innovations (SIs). The purpose of this paper is to examine factors in the Russian national context with weak non-profit sector with an ambiguous governmental policy toward the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on survey data (n=850 NPOs, 2015, Russia). The paper analyses the likelihood of a non-profit to introduce SIs due to external framework and organizational factors. Regression analysis was applied in the study. The study is based on a new sampling approach and examines non-profits as producers of SIs, but not cases of SIs per se.

Findings

The results demonstrate that the capacity of an NPO to develop SIs is explained by the following enabling factors: cross-boundary collaborative relations, volunteer involvement and diversity of the revenue structure. Composition of innovative sub-sector, opportunities and chances of getting into this group are explicitly determined and regulated by the current governmental policy toward the sector. That is that large and established non-profits are more likely to be innovative in Russia, unlike expected grass-roots.

Originality/value

The paper applies a theoretical framework to analyze the SI concept in a non-western context with weak civil society and an influential government. From this perspective, the results present empirical quantitative verification of the determinants of SI capacity of NPOs. The paper is among the first to apply a reverse sampling principle and examine SIs via NPOs as producers. The paper produced, for the first time, an empirical description of the nature of innovative activity by NPOs and an estimation of the extent of this activity in Russia.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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