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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Melissa Conley Tyler

This paper aims to examine the use of benchmarking as a management technique in the Australian non‐profit sector. Benchmarking has great potential benefit for the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the use of benchmarking as a management technique in the Australian non‐profit sector. Benchmarking has great potential benefit for the non‐profit sector, particularly given the reliance of non‐profit enterprises on effectively utilizing human capital; thus it might be expected that they would be enthusiastic about techniques such as benchmarking that can assist them in improving their performance. The non‐profit sector is a large and important part of the economy in the developed world.

Design/methodology/approach

To determine the use of benchmarking in the Australian non‐profit sector, the following methods were used: a review of published industry surveys and case studies; interviews with 15 non‐profit sector experts; and a review of more than 50 works on non‐profit management.

Findings

Research showed that benchmarking has been little used by non‐profit organizations in Australia to date. This seems to mirror the experience of non‐profits in other countries.

Research limitations/implications

The paper argues that the limited use of benchmarking in the non‐profit sector can be explained by: non‐profit management culture; lack of industry and funder pressure; and a lack of targeted information on benchmarking for the non‐profit sector. Any efforts to increase the use of benchmarking in the sector would need to ensure that these issues are overcome.

Practical implications

A plan of action is suggested for promoting benchmarking to non‐profit organizations.

Originality/value

The paper assesses the use of a standard management technique in the emerging area of non‐profit management. It should be of interest to those researching or managing in the Australian non‐profit sector. The paper may also be of interest to the non‐profit sector or human capital sector in other countries.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

C.P.M. Wilderom and F. Joldersma

Spending cuts, privatization, decentralization and deregulation are undermining the dominant role of the Dutch Government in private non‐profit organizations. Less…

Abstract

Spending cuts, privatization, decentralization and deregulation are undermining the dominant role of the Dutch Government in private non‐profit organizations. Less governmental interference will force non‐profit management to strike a balance between private management and public management. Argues that private non‐profit managers should adjust their managerial attitudes towards other stakeholders. Managers must first serve their own front‐line officers, and these front‐line officers, in turn, must communicate more interactively with their clients about the process of service delivery. However, this process should not be dictated by the client, but by the community of all relevant external and internal stakeholders. In interactions with many different stakeholders of the organization, non‐profit managers should develop and communicate a strategic quality credo.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Mohammed Aboramadan

In the present times, volunteers constitute a critical element of the human resources (HR) of non-profit organizations. All over the world, non-profit organizations work…

Abstract

In the present times, volunteers constitute a critical element of the human resources (HR) of non-profit organizations. All over the world, non-profit organizations work in complex environments, which are why non-profit organizations are facing increasing pressures to adopt contemporary HR management practices, not just in terms of their paid employees, but also with respect to managing their volunteers. It is frequently believed that volunteers are central to the functioning of non-profit organizations. Volunteers perform their responsibilities for the non-profit organization only because they care about its beneficiaries; however, a vital part is played by HR in facilitating their involvement, dedication and efficiency. Previously, non-profit organizations concentrated on developing and executing their objectives for the future; however, they are now starting to accept the significance of adopting a more professional approach regarding managing the volunteers so as to accomplish those objectives. In this regard, the purpose of the chapter is to: (1) analyze the factors that encourage volunteering in non-profit organizations; (2) offer theoretical anchoring through which it can be comprehended how HR practices draw, involve and sustain volunteers; (3) describe the HR practices that are most appropriate for volunteers and (4) offer the pathway for subsequent research regarding how HR and volunteering are related to each other.

Details

Contemporary Global Issues in Human Resource Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-393-9

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Book part
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Lisa D. Morrison

This chapter seeks to contribute to a better understanding of Non-Profit Organizations (NPOs) use of practices for the purpose of organizational sustainability by…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter seeks to contribute to a better understanding of Non-Profit Organizations (NPOs) use of practices for the purpose of organizational sustainability by highlighting the need for conducive performance measures and standards attached to NPO funding sources.

Methodology/approach

A review of literature for the UK Non-profit organization sector and NPO performance measures. The review structures literature as it relates to the non-profit sector and their relation to societal impact of human social service (HSS) non-profit organizations, non-profit performance measures, and processes of knowledge sharing in application of organizational evaluation.

Findings

This chapter provides a review of gaps in the literature referring suitable performance measurement and assessments suitable for the unique culture and approaches to performance measures of non-profit organizations. Future research implications suggest research in order to comprehend processes and procedures of performance measures inclusive of knowledge sharing and the processes of how non-profit learn, share, and evaluate internal and external to the NPO sector.

Originality/value

The value of this chapter is relevant for the public, government, and corporations to support efficient and effective ways in appropriating funds and defining successful NPO’s for external funders to invest.

Details

Governance and Performance in Public and Non-Profit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-107-4

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Eric Kong

This paper aims to examine five key strategic management concepts: industrial organisation (I/O), resource‐based view (RBV), knowledge‐based view (KBV), balanced scorecard…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine five key strategic management concepts: industrial organisation (I/O), resource‐based view (RBV), knowledge‐based view (KBV), balanced scorecard (BSC) and intellectual capital (IC) within the non‐profit context and to determine which is most applicable in the non‐profit sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the above concepts in the light of the unique non‐profit environment.

Findings

The IC concept is more effective compared with other strategic management concepts within the non‐profit context. IC is an important resource that non‐profit organisations need to develop in order to gain sustained strategic advantage.

Research limitations/implications

This paper helps to build a nascent body of literature suggesting that the concept of IC is the most effective strategic management concept in NPOs. The increased awareness of the IC concept in the sector, as a result of this paper, is likely to generate further research from both non‐profit practitioners and scholars.

Originality/value

Very little systematic research has reviewed the applicability of strategic management concepts within the non‐profit context. The paper acts as the first attempt to fill this gap.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2010

Dorothea Greiling

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of an explorative empirical study among German non‐profit organisations with respect to the implementation of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of an explorative empirical study among German non‐profit organisations with respect to the implementation of the balanced scorecard (implementation levels, perspectives, major challenges and obstacles, missing and used performance measures and enabling factors).

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data are generated and the findings are interpreted based on a descriptive approach. The interpretation is linked to normative expectations regarding the design and use of the balanced scorecard in non‐profit organisations.

Findings

Most of the non‐profit organisations which have been analysed in this paper are in an early phase of balanced scorecard implementation. The balanced scorecard is often used as a measurement tool and not as a management system. In most cases, participating organisations have an unexpected viewpoint with regard to their attitude towards the balanced scorecard, as they did not sufficiently adapt it to the distinct requirements of non‐profit operations.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on a sample of 20 non‐profit organisations in the field of social services. Thus, the results cannot be generalised, and qualitative interviews as well as a longitude study could be helpful in gaining additional insight.

Originality/value

The paper reports on firsthand empirical findings in an area which has not been extensively researched. Relevant non‐profit literature has so far been dominated by how‐to‐do approaches and normative concepts.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 59 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2018

Alexis Louis Roy and Christelle Perrin

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the impact of organizational culture on the conflict handling style in non-profit organizations. Conflicts in non-profit

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the impact of organizational culture on the conflict handling style in non-profit organizations. Conflicts in non-profit organizations and especially in associations are more numerous, mainly because of the search for compromise in the decision-making phases and the high level of loyalty in mission that strongly stimulates the voice of one’s opinion. The authors observe that a modification of the organizational culture, through symbolic changes, can resolve the conflicts sequence.

Design/methodology/approach

Culture is measured through the organizational culture profile tool and the culture deciphering technique. The authors detail two cases of non-profit organizations, in which conflicts sequence resolution was handled through organizational culture change while conflicts resolution at the individual level could not bring an end to the conflicts sequence.

Findings

These cases highlight how organizational culture shapes behaviors and conflicts handling styles. These cases also give insights on how an organizational culture can be changed to setup new default conflict handling styles in an organization. The cultural change management only worked when it was planned on critical cultural change readiness factors with a strong enforcement of the change by the governing bodies.

Research limitations/implications

This study complements research studies on how organizational culture shapes attitudes and behaviors and shows how and under which conditions a cultural change could resolve a conflict sequence. This study also presents a conflict resolution method when the roots of conflicts are embedded in the existing organizational culture. In such conflicts situation, interpersonal conflict resolution technique did not solve the conflicts sequence and only cultural change finally brought an end to the sequence.

Practical implications

A combined search on two levels, the individual level and the organizational culture level, will thus show convergent conflict sources and get a great deal of knowledge before solving individual-level conflicts.

Social implications

The non-profit sector is sometimes subject to high-conflict situation and this research contributes to more efficient conflict resolution protocols with an applicable method of conflict analysis, change management and conflict resolution.

Originality/value

The work showed how the organizational culture is a key element in the explanation of conflict sources and conflict handling in case of high and repeated conflict situation. It is thus possible to resolve conflict sequence by changing a carefully chosen cultural trait. Nevertheless, the culture change management program is complex and risky. In a high-conflict situation, the authors identified several key conflict resolution factors: the careful identification of the organizational culture traits explaining conflict handling style; the alignment of the management team on the cultural change plan to raise up the intensity of the new set of behaviors; and the selection of the most efficient symbolic change decision.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2019

Renato Civitillo

Non-profit sector management represent a research topic particularly discussed. This work tries to introduce a potential reaction to the need of managerial techniques and…

Abstract

Purpose

Non-profit sector management represent a research topic particularly discussed. This work tries to introduce a potential reaction to the need of managerial techniques and instruments to enhance the comprehension of the phenomenon and to accomplish a more powerful management of Non-profit institutions (NPIs).

Design/methodology/approach

The complexity of non-profit sector can be useful for identifying the ideal trajectories of a theoretical model of reference for the management of NPIs.

Findings

The main purpose is to outline a probable path for the evolution of the non-profit sector management (at the macroeconomic level) and of NPIs that are part of it (at the microeconomic level) and whose main dimensions are: professionalization, civic-engagement and accountability/corporate social responsibility.

Originality/value

This research tries to fill the gap existing in the international literature and the relative absence of systemic approaches to the management of NPIs, often focused only on some specific aspects of an extremely complex and multifaceted phenomenon.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Shamima Ahmed

Aims to focus on non‐profit leadership and use information from advertised job announcements, in the USA, of non‐profit CEO positions to identify required competencies and…

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to focus on non‐profit leadership and use information from advertised job announcements, in the USA, of non‐profit CEO positions to identify required competencies and job duties. The objective is to assess their relevancy and adequacy in dealing with the current challenges of the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Uses content analysis to analyze CEO job advertisements that were posted in The Nonprofit Times during the 1999‐2004‐time period.

Findings

Among those who list educational requirement, a predominant majority requires degree in academic areas related to the non‐profit sector. The bias to emulate the private sector's competencies, a source of the identity crisis of this sector, is not found in the educational requirement. Fundraising experience is the most common area of requirement under experiences. Fundraising is also listed as the major job duty.

Research limitations/implications

The sizes and life cycle stages of the non‐profit agencies are not incorporated. Future research could incorporate the above variables.

Practical implications

Design training using the findings to prepare future leaders. One of the findings suggests that non‐profits are not emphasizing the value of ethics in their search for executives. Considering the importance of this value in maintaining accountability, academicians could emphasize more of this as they design different non‐profit courses.

Originality/value

Assesses the adequacy of the currently emphasized competencies in leadership to deal with the current challenges of the sector (accountability, fiscal, competition, identity crisis etc.) and their implications.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Adela J. McMurray, Mazharul Islam, James C. Sarros and Andrew Pirola‐Merlo

The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the impact of leadership on workgroup climate and performance in a religious/church‐based non‐profit organization.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the impact of leadership on workgroup climate and performance in a religious/church‐based non‐profit organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The impact of leadership is investigated using a questionnaire comprised of established scales such as the transformational leadership scales (TLS), team climate inventory questionnaire (TCI), team effectiveness, workgroup cohesion, and interdependence scales. This is a context based study that considers the unique culture comprised of social, political, economic, technologic, personnel, and personal concerns. Descriptive, correlation, hierarchical regression, and SPSS macro developed by Preacher and Hayes were used as statistical techniques to assess the indirect effects (Sobel Tests) of variables.

Findings

Transformational leadership was identified as a key variable for the functioning of workgroup performance whilst transactional leadership was identified as a key influencing factor of workgroup climate. In addition, the study found a significant and positive large effect of workgroup climate on workgroup performance whilst both transformational and transactional leadership did not influence workgroup performance through workgroup climate. This finding provides areas in need of further research.

Research limitations/implications

There is likely to be posing risks of method variance or response biases as all data were drawn from employee surveys. There is also likely to be selection bias as the authors could not directly compare respondents with non‐respondents. The fact that there may be operational differences in other as well as smaller organizations, based on the limited size and the ability to allocate job functions, could limit the generalization of this result to other organizations.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant contribution to both scholarly theory and workplace practice in the non‐profit sector as the findings indicated that the influence of workgroup climate on workgroup performance provided an enabling context for the delivery of leadership in a religious/church‐based non‐profit organization.

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