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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Rachel Fleishman

Describes a study designed to develop instruments for examining the quality of routine care of hypertension among the elderly and, using non‐medical predictors of quality…

Abstract

Describes a study designed to develop instruments for examining the quality of routine care of hypertension among the elderly and, using non‐medical predictors of quality ‐ such as elderly patient and doctor variables and doctor‐patient interaction variables ‐ to explain the variance in the quality of care. The study population comprised 352 elderly people (92 per cent) in one Jerusalem neighbourhood who were members of Israel’s largest sick fund. Interviews, screening, observation and examination of records were the sources of information. Multivariate analysis was performed. The findings indicated a plethora of deficiencies in the quality of routine care, mostly in the quality of surveillance and the control of hypertension. It was found that the outcome of care is primarily a result of the physician‐patient interaction, rather than of a lack of patient compliance. Proposes a national programme using the instruments developed.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Sadegh Ahmadi Kashkoli, Ehsan Zarei, Abbas Daneshkohan and Soheila Khodakarim

Hospital responsiveness to the patient expectations of non-medical aspect of care can lead to patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Hospital responsiveness to the patient expectations of non-medical aspect of care can lead to patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the eight dimensions of responsiveness and overall patient satisfaction in public and private hospitals in Tehran, Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. In all, 500 patients were selected by the convenient sampling method from two public and three private hospitals. All data were collected using a valid and reliable questionnaire consisted of 32 items to assess the responsiveness of hospitals across eight dimensions and four items to assess the level of overall patient satisfaction. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression was performed by SPSS 18.

Findings

The mean score of hospital responsiveness and patient satisfaction was 3.48±0.69 and 3.54±0.97 out of 5, respectively. Based on the regression analysis, around 65 percent of the variance in overall satisfaction can be explained by dimensions of responsiveness. Seven independent variables had a positive impact on patient satisfaction; the quality of basic amenities and respect for human dignity were the most powerful factors influencing overall patient satisfaction.

Originality/value

Hospital responsiveness had a strong effect on overall patient satisfaction. Health care facilities should consider including efforts to responsiveness improvement in their strategic plans. It is recommended that patients should be involved in their treatment processes and have the right to choose their physician.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Nick Black

The way quality assurance has developed in the UK over the past three years is described. The lack of a national programme has meant that the onus has been on health…

Abstract

The way quality assurance has developed in the UK over the past three years is described. The lack of a national programme has meant that the onus has been on health districts. They have, however, been aided in their work in five ways: commitment from national and regional bodies, national quality assurance programmes with specific remits, training support for personnel, practical advice and the results of research projects. Not surprisingly, there has been considerable diversity in the approaches districts have adopted and the progress they have made.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Thomas L. Powers and Eric P. Jack

Responding to demand fluctuations is a difficult problem in the marketing of services. This problem is particularly difficult in the delivery of health care, as it…

Abstract

Purpose

Responding to demand fluctuations is a difficult problem in the marketing of services. This problem is particularly difficult in the delivery of health care, as it requires a complex network of facilities, equipment and trained personnel. This paper aims to examine how health care organizations are deploying volume flexible strategies in response to these changing demand patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used interviews with hospital administrators and a survey of administrators at academic medical centers in the USA to identify the use of internal and external volume flexible strategies, their impact on the creation of volume flexible capability, and their impact on performance outcomes.

Findings

The results show that there is a positive relationship between the use of internal volume flexible strategies, volume flexible capability, patient satisfaction, and organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

Although the measures used in this study were adequate for this exploratory research study, they require further development to improve their reliability as well as to capture additional dimensions of the constructs examined.

Practical implications

The results validate the impact of these strategies and indicate that internal volume flexible strategies are positively related to patient satisfaction and organizational performance.

Originality/value

Although health care organizations have implemented these strategies, little is known about their use or the impact that they have on satisfaction and performance – this work addresses this gap.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Maja Nemec, Tomaž Kolar and Borut Rusjan

The purpose of this paper is to analyse whether internet forums are an appropriate source for identification of causes of dissatisfaction of patients with non-medical

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse whether internet forums are an appropriate source for identification of causes of dissatisfaction of patients with non-medical aspects of healthcare services.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the guidelines of netnography qualitative research the authors identify relevant posts or comments on selected online forums in which web users show their dissatisfaction with healthcare services. Five popular Slovenian forums representing different interest communities have been chosen and 42 forums’ topics have been reviewed.

Findings

Online communities have an important role in exploring patient dissatisfaction. Through content analysis comments were coded into meaningful categories and subcategories.

Research limitations/implications

Some comments were more explicit, while others have provided general and looser reasons for dissatisfaction, and in such cases coding and content analysis of comments was more difficult.

Practical implications

Contents expressed within online communities are helpful in designing improvement activities since they enable determination of concrete relevant measures aiming at eliminating and preventing the established causes of discontent, such as instituting new policies, introducing training programs, determining desired changes in culture.

Originality/value

Usefulness of the netnography as a qualitative method of research is confirmed through confirmation that causes of dissatisfaction of Slovenian patients, which have been identified in the authors research are similar to those identified in previous research in the field of patient satisfaction conducted in Slovenia. Results constitute a new form of researching patient dissatisfaction and expose the specific causes of patient dissatisfaction with healthcare services in Slovenia.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Iisi Saame, Anne Reino and Maaja Vadi

The concept of organisational culture (also referred to later as OC) is one of the approaches in modern organisational analysis exploring the values, attitudes and beliefs…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of organisational culture (also referred to later as OC) is one of the approaches in modern organisational analysis exploring the values, attitudes and beliefs behind human behaviour in the workplace. OC as a social phenomenon is considered to be important for the sustainability of every organisation. In the service sector, OC may affect the nature and quality of the services provided. The aim of this paper is twofold: on the one hand, to highlight the patterns of OC in a hospital; and, on the other hand, to outline relationships between OC and patient satisfaction. The study was conducted in Tartu University Hospital, one of the most influential health care organisations in Estonia. This paper has original value by presenting an insight into organisational culture in the Estonian health care sector, and the findings of the study will expand knowledge of OC in the health care sector in general.

Design/methodology/approach

The OC instrument applied in a quantitative cross‐sectional study was earlier developed according to the Competing Values Framework (CVF). Data from 456 medical and non‐medical professionals were analysed using non‐parametric tests of descriptive statistics. A factor analysis was performed to assess the instrument's compatibility for analysing the OC pattern in the health care sector.

Findings

The dominant culture type in all the groups investigated was the Internal Processes type, mainly followed by the Rational Goal type, while different cultural patterns were observed in professional groups. The factor analysis yielded a three‐subscale solution. Clinics with high patient satisfaction did not score more than clinics with low patient satisfaction in terms of the Human Relations type.

Originality/value

In future studies a random sample design and a multidisciplinary approach to OC research should be followed in order to further explore OC patterns in hospitals and their consequences for different aspects of hospital performance.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2018

Yose Rizal

This paper aims to find in-depth information related the activities of “clean and healthy behavior” in household regulations, starting from assessment, planning…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to find in-depth information related the activities of “clean and healthy behavior” in household regulations, starting from assessment, planning, mobilization, implementation monitoring and assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data analysis was used for quantitative and qualitative approaches (mixing method). The qualitative approach was used to understand the individual phenomena in terms of finding, obtaining and describing the community behavior, which is related to health problems. The data obtained through the approach were then analyzed using interactive model.

Findings

In principle, this research exactly determines the responses of officers and the community to the process of “clean and healthy living behavior” activities. In general, the health facility used first is self-treatment, before seeking medical treatment or non-drug treatment. It proves that humans are always experimenting. From the research result, there are respondents who do not use medical treatment at 16 per cent; and the remaining 84 per cent are using medical treatment, despite being preceded by self-treatment (S) and non-medical treatment (N).

Originality/value

Currently, there have not been many studies related to the implementation of clean and healthy behavior although the information about it is very important to know. The managers of the “clean and healthy behavior” program need to know such information.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Penelope Fay Mitchell and Philippa Eleanor Pattison

This study aims to investigate whether and how organizational culture moderates the influence of other organizational capacities on the uptake of new mental health care

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether and how organizational culture moderates the influence of other organizational capacities on the uptake of new mental health care roles by non‐medical primary health and social care services.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross‐sectional survey design, data were collected in 2004 from providers in 41 services in Victoria, Australia, recruited using purposeful sampling. Respondents within each service worked as a group to complete a structured interview that collected quantitative and qualitative data simultaneously. Five domains of organizational capacity were analyzed: leadership, moral support and participation; organizational culture; shared concepts, policies, processes and structures; access to resource support; and social model of health. A principal components analysis explored the structure of data about roles and capacities, and multiple regression analysis examined relationships between them. The unit of analysis was the service (n=41).

Findings

Organizational culture was directly associated with involvement in two types of mental health care roles and moderated the influence of factors in the inter‐organizational environment on role involvement.

Research limitations/implications

Congruence between the values embodied in organizational culture, communicated in messages from the environment, and underlying particular mental health care activities may play a critical role in shaping the emergence of intersectoral working and the uptake of new roles.

Originality/value

This study is the first to demonstrate the importance of organizational culture to intersectoral collaboration in health care, and one of very few to examine organizational culture as a predictor of performance, compared with other organizational‐level factors, in a multivariate analysis. Theory is developed to explain the findings.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2003

Erica S Breslau

The sequence of stress, distress and somatization has occupied much of the late twentieth-century psychological research. The anatomy of stress can be viewed from…

Abstract

The sequence of stress, distress and somatization has occupied much of the late twentieth-century psychological research. The anatomy of stress can be viewed from interactional and hybrid theories that suggest that the individual relates with the surroundings by buffering the harmful effects of stressors. These acts or reactions are called coping strategies and are designed as protection from the stressors and adaptation to them. Failure to successfully adapt to stressors results in psychological distress. In some individuals, elevated levels of distress and failed coping are expressed in physical symptoms, rather than through feelings, words, or actions. Such “somatization” defends against the awareness of the psychological distress, as demonstrated in the psychosocial literature. The progression of behavior resulting from somatic distress moves from a private domain into the public arena, involving an elaborate medicalization process, is however less clear in sociological discourse. The invocation of a medical diagnosis to communicate physical discomfort by way of repeated use of health care services poses a major medical, social and economic problem. The goal of this paper is to clarify this connection by investigating the relevant literature in the area of women with breast cancer. This manuscript focuses on the relationship of psychological stress, the stress response of distress, and the preoccupation with one’s body, and proposes a new theoretical construct.

Details

Gender Perspectives on Health and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-239-9

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Angelique Lombarts

This chapter seeks to investigate the journey of breast and bowel cancer patients at the HMC Antoniushove. It zooms in on specific touch points and the possibilities for…

Abstract

This chapter seeks to investigate the journey of breast and bowel cancer patients at the HMC Antoniushove. It zooms in on specific touch points and the possibilities for improvements. Furthermore, it elucidates the learning process and more particular the dissemination between the hospital (staff and medical students) and hospitality students and professionals and emphasizes that looking from different perspectives and various disciplines is beneficial for all the stakeholders involved in hospitals.

Diseases are increasingly chronic; patients are more demanding and competition between different hospitals is increasing. That is why, in addition to excellent medical treatment, excellent service (referred to here as hospitality) is becoming increasingly important in the healthcare sector, including in hospitals. What does it have to meet? What do patients appreciate, what needs to be improved and how can these improvements be designed and implemented with the involvement of both patients and hospital staff?

Medical and hospitality students collaborated in this project analysing and describing the journey of patients with breast and bowel cancer. They examined the patient journey and elucidated the touch points, which patients indicated as critical during their ‘journey’.

Most important finding resulted from the learning process of this collaboration and the insight gained, a greater awareness and understanding of the non-medical needs and wishes, i.e. hospitality, of patients. Furthermore, the mutual understanding between the evidence-based stance of thinking of medical students and hospital staff at the one side and the more on soft skills–focused attitude of hospitality students on the other hand increased.

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