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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1976

ROSS I. HARROLD

This article considers the use of charging differential fees for the same tuition services as a means to widen the financial accessibility of non‐government schools to…

Abstract

This article considers the use of charging differential fees for the same tuition services as a means to widen the financial accessibility of non‐government schools to children of less affluent parents in Australia. After discussing theoretical aspects, the author considers how the theoretical concepts could be operationalized, then how a sliding scale fee schedule could be implemented without, and with, external financial assistance.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Craig Campbell and Lyndsay Connors

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the history of national education policy through an interview with one of its significant makers and critics, Lyndsay Connors, a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the history of national education policy through an interview with one of its significant makers and critics, Lyndsay Connors, a former Australian Schools Commissioner.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper occurs as an interview. The text is based on a revised conversation held as an event of the Australian and New Zealand History of Education Conference held at the University of Canberra, on 26 September 2017.

Findings

Australian educational policy is peculiarly complex, and apparently “irrational”. This appears especially so in relation to the government, tax-raised, funding of government and non-government schools. A combination of the peculiarities of Australian federalism in relation to education, political expediency, popular exhaustion with the “state aid” debate, the power of entrenched interest groups and the distancing of democratic decision making from the decision-making process in relation to education all play a part.

Originality/value

The originality of this contribution to a research journal lies in its combination of autobiography with historical policy analysis.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Ross Harrold and Phillip McKenzie

A means by which a nexus can be drawn between a secondary school′seducational operations and its resource allocation is suggested.Resources associated with the school′s…

Abstract

A means by which a nexus can be drawn between a secondary school′s educational operations and its resource allocation is suggested. Resources associated with the school′s teaching and its learning activities are “mapped”, then compared, on a grid of the school′s curriculum arrangements. If it is a non‐government (private) school, the analysis is made by comparing average with “breakeven” class sizes; if it is a government (public) school, the analysis compares the patterns of teaching class periods with pupil periods. The analysis identifies implicit resource cross‐subsidisation among groups of students who take different levels and types of subjects. There is no intention that cross‐subsidisation should be eliminated but decision makers are challenged to justify the revealed pattern of subsidisation in terms of the educational and equity purposes of their school.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Jennifer L. Roberts and Mary M. Chittooran

There has been an increase in the number of non-government organization (NGO) schools in India’s disadvantaged communities. Since these schools often serve the most…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been an increase in the number of non-government organization (NGO) schools in India’s disadvantaged communities. Since these schools often serve the most marginalized populations, it is important to understand their role in addressing educational inequities. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of an NGO school in Uttar Pradesh, India in improving girls’ education.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology was utilized to identify barriers to girls’ education and ways in which the NGO school is working to minimize educational inequities.

Findings

The barriers to girls’ education in this study are traditional values, lack of economic opportunities, and safety concerns. The school works to minimize these inequities by providing a rigorous curriculum, teaching the students how to be good citizens, improving school facilities, and providing free school supplies. Implications – it is through better understanding the role of the NGO sector that a more complete understanding of the status of girls’ education will develop.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on girls’ education, but expands the conversation to include NGO schools.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2019

Yi-Hai Zhang, Hongyu Peng, Hin Wah Chris Cheung, King Man Eric Chong and Chin Fung Philip Chow

The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences between Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) and Mainland in terms of education and also the influence of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences between Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) and Mainland in terms of education and also the influence of it on doing comparative educational research. Hong Kong SAR is ruled by the Chinese Government under the framework of “One country, two systems.” It makes Hong Kong SAR different from other Mainland cities based on different aspects including, education. The finding of this paper provides a systematic review about the differences between these two Chinese societies in terms of education and also implication for conducting comparative educational research in these two societies and also generating some implications for cross-national and cross-cultural study in education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper made references from the framework proposed by Bray and Thomas (1995) in relation to comparative educational research to make comparison between Hong Kong SAR and Mainland China. Multi-level comparison is conducted between two societies in terms of education, especially aspects relating to conducting educational research sat social, school and individual levels.

Findings

This paper identified the influence of “One county, two systems” on education at different levels such as ideology, school management system and use of languages in teaching. Such differences affect the choice of topics, sampling strategy, research design, data analysis and interpretation and also ethical considerations when conducting comparative research between Hong Kong SAR and Mainland China.

Originality/value

This paper is an integrated analysis of conducting educational research in two Chinese societies and provides insights for further discussions and possible research about this topic.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Teacher Preparation in Australia: History, Policy and Future Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-772-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

David Gurr, Lawrie Drysdale and Bill Mulford

This paper aims to provide an Australian perspective on successful school leadership.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an Australian perspective on successful school leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on case studies in two Australian states (Tasmania and Victoria). Case studies for each state were developed independently and are reported separately.

Findings

The findings show a remarkable degree of commonality demonstrating that the core aspects of successful school leadership can be identified in ways that can help explain the complexity of principal leadership that leads to improved student outcomes.

Originality/value

Highlights the importance and contribution of the principal to the quality of education.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Susan Teather and Wendy Hillman

There has been very little empirical research for the need to identify the importance of an inclusive territory of commonality for “invisible” students with disabilities…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been very little empirical research for the need to identify the importance of an inclusive territory of commonality for “invisible” students with disabilities in Australian education testing, such as the National Assessment Program-Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology used a cross-sectional mixed methods, deductive quantitative, an inductive qualitative, functionalist perspective and interpretivist perspective from internet secondary data analysis. This was undertaken to investigate the government functionalist macrosociology of Australian education to the detriment of the microsociology debate of students with disabilities, for inclusive education and social justice.

Findings

This finding showed vastly underestimated numbers of students with disabilities in Australian schools experienced through “gatekeeping”, non-participation in NAPLAN testing and choices of schools, resulting in poor educational outcomes and work-readiness.

Social implications

The research findings showed that functionalism of Australian education is threatening not only social order, well-being and resilience of an innovative Australian economy through welfare dependency; but also depriving people with disabilities of social equality and empowerment against poverty brought about by a lack of education and of the human right to do a decent job.

Originality/value

The study provided a critical evaluation of the weaknesses of government functionalism; specifically the relationship between the dualism of macro and micro perspectives, which promotes the existence of “invisible” students with disabilities in education, despite government legislation purporting an inclusive education for all students.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Jim Watterston and Brian Caldwell

The purpose of this paper is to review strategies to build capacity for school improvement in Australia. The focus is on public schools and strategies adopted for the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review strategies to build capacity for school improvement in Australia. The focus is on public schools and strategies adopted for the system as a whole.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper traces developments from a national perspective and makes a case for the key contemporary policy shift that has provided the platform for a new era of educational reform. Two contrasting case studies are described in order to demonstrate the pathways embarked on by a large jurisdiction, namely the State of Victoria, which has led the nation in terms of devolved decision‐making for public schools, and second, a much smaller jurisdiction, the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), which is introducing a range of reforms to give public schools much greater autonomy in order to achieve improved performance. The paper concludes with a “futures” view of how strategies may continue to evolve. Shifting the language from “improvement” to “transformation” is canvassed.

Findings

It is concluded that a key to success has been to align strategies among different levels of the school system: central, regional/district, school and classroom. The possibilities for moving beyond improvement to transformation are canvassed.

Originality/value

The value of the paper lies in its up‐to‐date account of system‐wide efforts to improve schools and a summary of evidence on their impact. The paper is of particular interest to school and school system leaders as well as those engaged in the study of educational policy and educational leadership.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

Jane Wilkinson, Christine Edwards-Groves, Peter Grootenboer and Stephen Kemmis

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Catholic district offices support school leaders’ instructional leadership practices at times of major reform.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Catholic district offices support school leaders’ instructional leadership practices at times of major reform.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs the theory of practice architectures as a lens through which to examine local site-based responses to system-wide reforms in two Australian Catholic secondary schools and their district offices. Data collection for these parallel case studies included semi-structured interviews, focus groups, teaching observations, classroom walkthroughs and coaching conversations.

Findings

Findings suggest that in the New South Wales case, arrangements of language and specialist discourses associated with a school improvement agenda were reinforced by district office imperatives. These imperatives made possible new kinds of know-how, ways of working and relating to district office, teachers and students when it came to instructional leading. In the Queensland case, the district office facilitated instructional leadership practices that actively sought and valued practitioners’ input and professional judgment.

Research limitations/implications

The research focussed on two case studies of district offices supporting school leaders’ instructional leadership practices at times of major reform. The findings are not generalizable.

Practical implications

Practically, the studies suggest that for excellent pedagogical practice to be embedded and sustained over time, district offices need to work with principals to foster communicative spaces that promote explicit dialogue between teachers and leaders’ interpretive categories.

Social implications

The paper contends that responding to the diversity of secondary school sites requires district office practices that reject a one size fits all formulas. Instead, district offices must foster site-based education development.

Originality/value

The paper adopts a practice theory approach to its study of district support for instructional leader’ practices. A practice approach rejects a one size fits all approach to educational change. Instead, it focusses on understanding how particular practices come to be in specific sites, and what kinds of conditions make their emergence possible. As such, it leads the authors to consider whether and how different practices such as district practices of educational reforming or principals’ instructional leading might be transformed, or conducted otherwise, under other conditions of possibility.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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