Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2010

Gemma Edgar and Frances Lockie

The purpose of this paper is to focus on compacts and their effectiveness in ensuring that non‐government organisations (NGOs) are able to remain independent, critical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on compacts and their effectiveness in ensuring that non‐government organisations (NGOs) are able to remain independent, critical checks on government.

Design/methodology/approach

The experiences of the English Compact and the Working Together for NSW agreement, created in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW). The analysis of Working Together relies upon interviews conducted with key informants involved in its negotiation. Using these cases the effectiveness of compacts in supporting NGOs, particularly in their role as advocates is examined.

Findings

The paper finds that, despite the similarities between the English Compact and Working Together, the NSW government has not produced similar supporting structures or mechanisms and that no champion exists to drive it within government. As a result, awareness of Working Together is low in both the NSW government and among NGOs, and, unlike the English Compact, it has had little effect on the ability of NGOs to advocate independently. As such, it is suggested that compacts do not offer long‐term solutions to the difficulties in the relationship between governments and NGOs. This is because their efficacy is reliant upon the support of government.

Research limitations/implications

The list of interviewees is by no means exhaustive. Despite numerous attempts, the authors were unable to obtain interviews from a number of figures approached from middle‐level departments within the NSW state government.

Originality/value

The interviews are original and new to the literature on compacts. This interview material is especially useful as little literature exists that analyses the Working Together for NSW agreement.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Binod Krishna Shrestha and Devi Ram Gnyawali

The purpose of this paper is to examine how managers in Nepalese business organizations and non‐profit non‐government organizations understand and practice strategic…

Downloads
1601

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how managers in Nepalese business organizations and non‐profit non‐government organizations understand and practice strategic management and to what extent such understanding and practices differ from those in western countries.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth case studies of eight business organizations and non‐government organizations (NGOs) were prepared based on multiple data collection such as interviews and review of reports and the cases were analyzed to identify several themes for discussion of similarities and differences in the views and practices of strategic management.

Findings

Managers in Nepal have developed some shared understanding of key aspects of strategic management and practice some important aspects of strategic management; much remains to be done in order for them to develop a clear strategic focus so that they could develop their abilities to compete with global players and to create competitive advantages.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggested several avenues for future research for more systematic and data‐driven studies on the roles of international exposure on managers, international partners, national culture and other macro environmental conditions on strategic management practices in Nepal and South Asia.

Practical implications

The research findings are useful for managers of business organizations and non‐government organizations to develop their strategies for superior performance in South Asian countries characterized by volatile business environment and resource constraints.

Social implications

NGOs which work for social development need to improve their strategic management practices with more rigorous and resilient strategic implementation in Nepal.

Originality/value

This research is unique in the context of Nepal and will be useful in similar contexts. The findings contribute to understanding the strategic management practices in a unique culture.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Ling Zhong and Karen R. Fisher

As transition countries shift to a mixed welfare system, the accountability of non-government organizations (NGOs) becomes critical to quality services. Yet, poor…

Abstract

Purpose

As transition countries shift to a mixed welfare system, the accountability of non-government organizations (NGOs) becomes critical to quality services. Yet, poor financial and managerial practices of some NGOs in China have led to distrust from citizens. The purpose of this paper is to use a democratic accountability framework to examine citizen participation in NGOs as an approach to understand an angle of this distrust. Does the Chinese language academic literature about NGO accountability engage with concepts of participation in NGO governance, management and service use?

Design/methodology/approach

The method was content analysis of a search of words and concepts relating to NGOs, participation and accountability in the available Chinese language literature on NGO accountability through the newly developed search engine Wenjin Search of the National Library of China.

Findings

The analysis found that most Chinese literature only emphasizes problems of accountability, causes and regulatory solutions. When the literature includes participation, it refers to it as a platform for civil society, rather than a process of accountability within an NGO.

Research limitations/implications

Searching by keywords in one search engine may not be exhaustive. The results probably reflect most of the current research of Chinese scholars, considering the depth of the search engine.

Practical implications

Formal NGOs are relatively new in the Chinese political landscape; and government regulations are largely administrative and unenforced. At conceptual and political levels, the absence of discussion about other forms of accountability ignores questions about public dissatisfaction with NGO performance and the public’s willingness to contribute to NGO effectiveness, and civic engagement.

Originality/value

An implication is that until Chinese NGO research also incorporates democratic accountability concepts, it will continue to ignore the internal and external drivers from citizens for NGO change. Transition country NGOs that encourage participation have the potential to engender greater accountability in the organization, community and in state relations.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Sandeep Goel

The present paper aims to discuss the “money laundering” aspect and related governance practices of third sector, non-government organizations (NGOs). In NGOs globally…

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper aims to discuss the “money laundering” aspect and related governance practices of third sector, non-government organizations (NGOs). In NGOs globally, foreign contributions are not an old story. But in NGOs, the spotlight on the vulnerability of money laundering in the name of foreign contribution(s) requires special attention. The study highlights the dimension of money laundering in an Indian NGO and related dominance of board leadership about governance issues by way of foreign contribution.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study uses case study method for enlightening the money laundering tussle in a non-government organization and its governance impact on the stakeholders’ interests at large.

Findings

The results stress upon the need for to have strong anti-money laundering practices in non-government organizations in the form of foreign contributions which are still struggling to have a sound governance system in place.

Practical implications

It is of significance to both policymakers and standards setters at the international level in the light of increasing global awareness about anti-money laundering practices of the third sector.

Social implications

There will be an improvement in the corporate management related to money-laundering of these organizations and infuse higher confidence among stakeholders and further lead to their effective regulatory framework.

Originality/value

It is an original paper which highlights the role and significance of money laundering practices in the third sector.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Vien Chu and Belinda Luke

This study aims to investigate how non-government organisation (NGO) managers balance accountability to donors and beneficiaries and the role of felt responsibility in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how non-government organisation (NGO) managers balance accountability to donors and beneficiaries and the role of felt responsibility in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Using concepts of accountability theory, practices of microenterprise development NGOs are examined in two countries – Bangladesh and Indonesia – through interviews with managers of 20 NGOs and analysis of NGOs’ publicly available data.

Findings

Findings show a shift in emphasis from a vertical view (upward to donors and downward to beneficiaries) to a horizontal view of NGO accountability. Under this view, a selective approach to donors whose mission and approaches to poverty alleviation aligned with those of the NGOs played an essential role in supporting NGOs’ internal accountability. Further, felt a responsibility to beneficiaries is identified as an important mediator balancing both upward and downward accountability. While accountability to donors and beneficiaries was interrelated, accountability to donors was considered a short-term objective and accountability to beneficiaries was considered a long-term and overriding objective.

Originality/value

Findings contribute a further understanding of the role of felt responsibility to beneficiaries as a mediator for balancing upward and downward accountability based on the perspectives of NGO managers. Reframing accountability through a horizontal view helps to balance multiple directions of NGO accountability: to self, donors and beneficiaries.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

History & Crime
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-699-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Deanna Davy

The market in trafficked children bought and sold for sexual exploitation is one of the most inhumane transnational crimes that appear to have been facilitated by…

Downloads
7563

Abstract

Purpose

The market in trafficked children bought and sold for sexual exploitation is one of the most inhumane transnational crimes that appear to have been facilitated by globalisation and its many effects, such as growing disparity in wealth between North and South. Child sex trafficking (CST) in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) is an extremely complex problem, deeply rooted in historical injustice, gender inequality and poverty. In addition to the complexities of the child trafficking issue, the organisations that seek to combat CST are themselves not always a united force and display their own internal and inter-agency complexities. The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the key complexities of responding to CST in Thailand and Cambodia.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for this research consisted of 22 semi-structured interviews with anti-child trafficking experts in Thailand and Cambodia, in addition to field observations in various child sex tourism hubs in Southeast Asia.

Findings

The complexities of the CST problem in Thailand and Cambodia are discussed as well as analysis of the internal and inter-agency barriers faced by the organisations that seek to combat CST. The research finds that, due to limitations in donor funding, anti-trafficking organisations face difficulties in effectively responding to all aspects of the CST problem. The recommendation is made for improved advocacy networking against this transnational crime. Recent success stories are highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

The research for this paper involved semi-structured interviews with staff from non-government organisations and United Nations agencies, but not with government representatives. The lack of available data from Thai and Cambodian government representatives limits the ability of the researcher to evaluate the effectiveness of anti-trafficking organisations’ response to the child trafficking issue. Also lacking is the voice of child trafficking victims, the key beneficiaries of anti-trafficking organisations’ aid and advocacy efforts.

Originality/value

There is an abundance of literature on the subject of CST but a dearth in scholarly literature on the subject of advocacy and policy responses to CST in Southeast Asia. This paper provides a valuable contribution the knowledge base on child trafficking by analysing both the complexities of the CST issue and the complexities, for anti-trafficking organisations, of effectively combating CST in the GMS.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 34 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Mohan Kaul

The experiences of eleven successful development projects from six different countries are summarised and discussed. The management aspects of non‐commercial development…

Abstract

The experiences of eleven successful development projects from six different countries are summarised and discussed. The management aspects of non‐commercial development projects are studied to identify the features which contribute to their success and which could be incorporated in the design of future projects and the training of project managers. A mixture of government and non‐government projects are studied, highlighting the increasing role of the latter in development activities. Areas for further research are noted.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Kirstin Scholten, Pamela Sharkey Scott and Brian Fynes

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of agility in the context of supply chains of humanitarian aid (HA) organizations, particularly non‐government

Downloads
4451

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of agility in the context of supply chains of humanitarian aid (HA) organizations, particularly non‐government organizations (NGOs). This responds to the increasing pressure on NGOs to use their resources more strategically if they are to gain donor trust and long‐term commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature‐based approach that extends the commercial supply chain concept of agility to NGOs is combined with the first exploratory semi‐structured interviews of these concepts with five NGO supply chain directors.

Findings

The commercial concept of agility when responding to disaster relief holds strong potential for increasing efficiency and effectiveness, but this application is restrained by the absence of supporting information technology (IT) and the relegation of supply chain management (SCM) to the “back office” by NGOs. This has potential implications for NGOs and other HA agencies.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents an exploratory study, and an extended pool of interviewees would reinforce the qualitative findings. Planned future research will address this issue.

Practical implications

Practical guidance on how NGOs can proactively manage their organization's ability to respond with agility in a highly pressured environment is provided.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to offer practical guidance to managers of NGOs on strategies available to improve their organization's flexibility and agility, based on theoretical concepts and initial exploratory data. In addition, evidence of how commercial tools apply in a different arena may prompt commercial managers to be more innovative in utilizing and customizing supply chain principles to their particular context of operation.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 40 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Nava Subramaniam, Monika Kansal, Dessalegn Getie Mihret and Shekar Babu

This paper aims to assess the risks and challenges of corporate social responsibility (CSR) management in the Indian-mandated CSR ecosystem from a service…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the risks and challenges of corporate social responsibility (CSR) management in the Indian-mandated CSR ecosystem from a service purchaser–supplier dualistic perspective and the role management control systems (MCS) and social capital play in managing such risks and challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

This study undertook a qualitative approach that involved in-depth interviews of 22 CSR directors, managers or chief executive officers from 13 central public sector enterprises (CPSEs) that had purchased CSR services and nine managers of non-government organisations (NGOs) serving as CSR suppliers. Data analysis was founded on the principal–agent and social capital theoretical perspectives.

Findings

A highly bureaucratic, time-pressured mandated environment poses several goal congruence and adverse selection threats to outsourced CSR project arrangements. A mix of formal and informal control mechanisms is critical for enhancing trust or bonding between service purchasers and service providers and enriching bridging capital or access to resources derived from interpersonal connections between NGOs and communities.

Practical implications

NGOs and CPSEs may benefit from understanding each other’s goals and culture and using appropriate formal and informal MCS for managing CSR expectations and outcomes.

Originality/value

Drawing on a unique mandatory CSR regime, this study offers principal–agent and social capital perspectives on CSR programme delivery, highlighting the importance of various formal and informal MCS in lowering agency costs in outsourced CSR relationships.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000