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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

A.H. Buckman, M. Mayfield and Stephen B.M. Beck

Within the building sector a lack of clarity in terminology does not help designers, clients or researchers. Non-domestic buildings have shown rapid increases in the use…

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Abstract

Purpose

Within the building sector a lack of clarity in terminology does not help designers, clients or researchers. Non-domestic buildings have shown rapid increases in the use of advanced technology and control systems with varying drivers, many of which are labelled as intelligent. The term smart has been used interchangeably with intelligent without any clear distinction between the two. If the term Smart Buildings represented a separate, more advanced grouping, it would provide an opportunity to focus the future progress of non-domestic building development. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon academic and industrial literature and experience, this paper reviews the scope of Intelligent Buildings and the current available definitions of Smart Buildings to form a clear definition of both smart and Intelligent Buildings.

Findings

These definitions define the border between the intelligent and the (more advanced) Smart Building. The upper bound of the Smart Building is defined by (the future development of) the predictive building.

Originality/value

This work provides a clear focus which will allow the progression of the non-domestic building sector by providing guidance and aspiration, as well as providing a platform upon which a large amount of technical work can be based.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Sustainability Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-481-3

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

98

Abstract

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Rajat Gupta, Matthew Gregg and Rohini Cherian

The field of building performance evaluation (BPE) forms a fragmented whole with tools and methods that are not widely applicable. In response, the purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The field of building performance evaluation (BPE) forms a fragmented whole with tools and methods that are not widely applicable. In response, the purpose of this paper is to develop and demonstrate a novel BPE framework to bring consistency and flexibility in evaluating actual building performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper critically reviews and evaluates existing BPE methods and techniques and situates them in different building life stages. Using a hierarchical approach, a “BPE framework” is devised for new and existing buildings as well as refurbishments. The working of the BPE framework is demonstrated by applying it to four discreet BPE studies to enable cross-comparison of different BPE approaches based on their stage of application, depth and duration of BPE investigations.

Findings

The framework is designed to have four graduated levels starting at the “basic” level and developing incrementally to “core”, “comprehensive” and “advanced” levels, thereby focussing on “need to know” rather than “nice to have”. The framework also offers a mechanism to map different types of BPE studies with varying scope and content.

Practical implications

As we enter a world of smart meters and smart buildings, we are transitioning into a new future of understanding building performance. The study helps to better understand which BPE method can be used to study what aspect of building performance and in what building lifecycle stage, against time, cost and user expertise.

Originality/value

The graduated and flexible framework helps to bring consistency in evaluating building performance in an otherwise fragmented field, to help improve building performance.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Nick French

The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on how the 2018 energy efficiency legislation in the UK, Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES), is impacting upon…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on how the 2018 energy efficiency legislation in the UK, Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES), is impacting upon the UK market with a particular emphasis on the investment market.

Design/methodology/approach

This practice briefing is an overview of the 2018 legislation and comments on how market awareness has changed since its introduction and the potential impact upon prices of affected properties moving forward.

Findings

This paper discusses how capital and rental values are beginning to be discounted in the market to allow for current and future liabilities under the MEES legislation. This has a significant impact on strategies for property investment.

Practical implications

The role of the property professional is to ensure that clients are fully conversant with their statutory obligations and to advise on appropriate investment strategies to optimise their property portfolios.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights on the requirements of MEES legislation to aid the property professional.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Dermot McLellan

A new property VAT regime coming into force on 1st April, 1989, is expected to have a major impact on commercial property development and management. The Government…

Abstract

A new property VAT regime coming into force on 1st April, 1989, is expected to have a major impact on commercial property development and management. The Government proposes to change the VAT rules relating to commercial property in the 1989 Finance Bill following a judgment in the European Court of Justice (on 21st June) that certain UK VAT rules were inconsistent with European Law. Although the broad outlines of the new rules are fairly clear much detail remains to be defined. A consultation process will be followed (in December) by draft legislation. Until then the final details of the new rules remain a matter for speculation. The VAT rules relating to residential property will remain largely unchanged. The main changes for commercial property can be summarised as follows:

Details

Property Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Article
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Kin Wai Michael Siu, Jia Xin Xiao and Yi Lin Wong

This study aims to address policy, implementation and management, the three stages of inclusive open space. It compares both the level of design and implementation of open…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address policy, implementation and management, the three stages of inclusive open space. It compares both the level of design and implementation of open space in Beijing, Hong Kong and Taipei by following the inclusive guidelines. It also identifies recommendations for policy, implementation and management of inclusive open space and its facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Field observations were conducted in 27 parks within three cities. In-depth interviews were conducted with a variety of participants, including visually impaired persons, government officers, representatives of non-governmental organisations, local communities and experts.

Findings

Most of the so-called inclusive environments and facilities have not been user-friendly in actual practice. The findings suggest that policies are an essential precondition; however, implementation and management must not be ignored because they ensure the effectiveness of inclusive design.

Research limitations/implications

Comprehensive and continuous studies on the proposed framework are recommended throughout the policy, implementation and management processes.

Practical implications

The findings serve as a reference and direction for taking a holistic approach to inclusive design of open space in densely populated cities.

Social implications

This study examines the levels of inclusive open space and illustrates how to provide barrier-free environments that can be used by the widest spectrum of people.

Originality/value

This study evaluates policy, implementation and management in the three cities based on 29 guidelines generated from seven principles of inclusive design. A research framework is proposed for researchers and policymakers to consider how to achieve effective inclusive open spaces.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Gabriela Zapata-Lancaster

This paper aims to investigate the thermal comfort practices in four non-domestic buildings and explores how the organisational context affects the actions and practices…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the thermal comfort practices in four non-domestic buildings and explores how the organisational context affects the actions and practices of occupants and facilities managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applied qualitative methods and post-occupancy evaluation methodologies to investigate the thermal practices in four case studies. A combination of qualitative and quantitative methodologies was deployed, namely, semi-structured interviews, questionnaires, observation and monitoring studies of building performance.

Findings

The concept “distributed agency” was applied to analyse the thermal comfort practices in non-domestic buildings. This concept helped to illustrate everyday actions by occupants and facilities managers in relation to the organisational context. Occupants’ actions and building management practices could be affected by the organisation norms and context leading to problems and dissatisfaction with indoor thermal conditions.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on a small number of case studies and it is exploratory. Extensive monitoring data were not available. However, the research identified the thermal conditions and occupants’ satisfaction levels as background where actions to achieve thermal comfort and facilities manager’s practices took place.

Practical implications

The study suggests the need to examine in greater depth how the organisational goals and individual goals could be linked to support specific building performance targets.

Social implications

The paper advocates for the application of multidisciplinary approaches to study the occupant dimension of building performance. It suggests the need to develop a nuanced understanding of how occupants pursue comfort as active agents who interact with the built environment.

Originality/value

The study has applied social practice theory to consider the influence of the organisation on thermal comfort practices in non-domestic buildings; considering the perspectives of building occupants and facilities managements within the organisational context.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Megan Strachan and Phil Banfill

Pressure is growing globally for larger businesses to improve the energy performance of the buildings in which they operate. Property or facility managers are usually…

Abstract

Purpose

Pressure is growing globally for larger businesses to improve the energy performance of the buildings in which they operate. Property or facility managers are usually responsible for these improvements through energy‐led refurbishment. The number and complexity of possible interventions pose challenges that these professionals attempt to meet by using decision support tools (DSTs). The work aims to identify key features of DSTs for energy‐led building refurbishment and define an optimum approach.

Design/methodology/approach

A desk study examined ten DSTs reported in the available literature and evaluated them against a set of desirable attributes that a property or facility manager would value for this task.

Findings

The results of the desk study concluded that no DST offers every feature and that there is an opportunity for a new DST for energy‐led refurbishment. An optimum DST template is proposed, consisting of a seven‐step process from assessment of the existing state of the building through to continuous evaluation and improvement of the refurbished building.

Originality/value

The work combines the best features of available DSTs into a novel optimised strategy for energy‐led refurbishment of non‐domestic buildings, which is geographically non‐specific and could be applied anywhere in the world.

Details

Facilities, vol. 30 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2017

Megan E. Strachan and Phil FG Banfill

In the context of the energy-led refurbishment of traditionally constructed non-domestic buildings, the purpose of this study was to identify the attributes that…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of the energy-led refurbishment of traditionally constructed non-domestic buildings, the purpose of this study was to identify the attributes that professionals consider to be important in the selection of energy performance improvement measures (EPIMs) and to establish their relative importance.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based Delphi exercise was carried out to draw up a set of attributes agreed among a small panel of experts. Subsequently, a paired comparison questionnaire was completed by the experts to establish the relative importance ascribed to the attributes.

Findings

In total, 22 assessment attributes, relevant to different stages in the building’s life cycle, were agreed as important by the expert panel. Measures fell into one of three broad groups, expressed on a weighting scale of 0-100, such that the sum of the weights of all 22 measures was 100. Measures of relatively high importance (7-9 per cent) included capital cost, potential energy and carbon savings, financial payback and impact on the building’s vapor permeability. Measures of medium importance (4-5 per cent) were impact on internal air movement, loss of significant original building fabric, impact on internal layout, appearance and occupant comfort, environmental impact and availability of grants or subsidies. Eight further measures were ranked of low importance (2-3 per cent).

Originality/value

This paper is the first attempt to draw up a ranking order of the attributes of EPIMs applicable to non-domestic buildings. It confirms that more attributes must be considered by professionals with decision-making responsibility than merely cost, energy performance and payback on investment and suggests that policy instruments targeting or incentivizing a single or a restricted range of attributes risk failure to deliver the desired improvements.

Details

Facilities, vol. 35 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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