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Article

Paraskevi Angelopoulou and Efharis Panagopoulou

The purpose of this paper is to systematically describe the types of non-clinical rounds implemented in hospital settings.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically describe the types of non-clinical rounds implemented in hospital settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This scoping review was conducted and reported in accordance with the PRISMA. The review followed the four stages of conducting scoping review as defined by Arskey and O’Malley (2005).

Findings

Initially, 978 articles were identified through database search from which only 24 studies were considered relevant and included in the final review. Overall, eight types of non-clinical rounds were identified (death rounds, grand rounds, morbidity and mortality conferences, multidisciplinary rounds, patient safety rounds, patient safety huddles, walkarounds and Schwartz rounds) that independently of their format, goal, participants and type of outcomes aimed to enhance patient safety and improve quality of healthcare delivery in hospital settings, either by focusing on physician, patient or organizational system.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge this is the first review that aims to provide a comprehensive summary to the types of non-clinical rounds that has been applied in clinical settings.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Book part

Taryn Aiello, Denver Severt, Paul Rompf and Deborah Breiter

This study investigates service excellence and hospitality perceptions in a hospital setting for an exploratory study of the familiarity of hospital administration with…

Abstract

This study investigates service excellence and hospitality perceptions in a hospital setting for an exploratory study of the familiarity of hospital administration with the topic of hospitality and service excellence. It is unique from other hospitality and service research in that it considers hospitality and service excellence as separate concepts, and specifically considers hospitality, such as service excellence, as a philosophy that may be transcend its traditional industries of origin. Part of the premise of this study explores how hospitality in a healthcare setting extends past service excellence in offering a service to a patient to create a comfortable and welcoming environment to combat patient anxiety and stress. This exploratory research provides a necessary foundation for more extensive empirical testing of the premise.

Using a qualitative case study, this research measured top management's perceptions of service excellence and hospitality within one community-based hospital located in Orlando, Florida. Three conclusions were revealed: (1) a mixed commitment by top management to concepts of service excellence and hospitality, (2) the terms “service excellence” and “hospitality” were generally discussed as though they were equivalent, and (3) significant external and internal barriers to the delivery of service excellence and hospitality in the hospital setting were identified.

The study has implications for healthcare organizations seeking to implement practices of hospitality and service management to improve overall healthcare service delivery. Additionally, the study of hospitality outside of its traditional industry boundaries may result in the generation of new improvement options/opportunities for traditional managers of hospitality businesses and organizational researchers. The study can be used as a foundation for the formulation of additional studies in the area of service excellence and hospitality applied to other layers in an organization irrespective of industry setting.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-718-9

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Article

Ricardo Wray, Nancy Weaver, Prajakta Adsul, Kanak Gautam, Keri Jupka, Stacie Zellin, Kathryn Goggins, Santosh Vijaykumar, Natasha Hansen and Rima Rudd

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a collaborative effort between a health care organization and academic institution to strengthen organizational health literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a collaborative effort between a health care organization and academic institution to strengthen organizational health literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The intervention took place at a rural, federally qualified health clinic in Missouri between May 2009 and April 2011. Qualitative interviews of key informants were conducted before (n=35) and after (n=23) the intervention to examine program implementation and success in effecting organizational change.

Findings

Intervention activities helped establish a comprehensive understanding of health literacy. The project achieved moderate, fundamental and sustainable organizational change. The program successfully integrated health literacy practices into clinic systems and garnered leadership and organizational commitment, helped the workforce improve interpersonal communication and embedded practices making health education materials more accessible.

Originality/value

The study points to programmatic, conceptual and methodological challenges that must be addressed for organizations to improve health literacy practices, and suggests change management strategies to advance organizational health literacy.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article

Amanda Hart

Introduction This was the first comprehensive survey and analysis of UK university professorial and senior staff salaries. The survey was conducted by the AUT in response…

Abstract

Introduction This was the first comprehensive survey and analysis of UK university professorial and senior staff salaries. The survey was conducted by the AUT in response to membership demand for information on their salaries and in order to assess the support among professors and senior staff for a salary scale. The analysis of the results was carried out by the Polytechnic of North London (PNL) Social Research Unit.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article

John Storey and Richard Holti

The purpose of this paper is to explore the various ways in which clinical executive directors and non‐clinical executive directors are interpreting and responding to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the various ways in which clinical executive directors and non‐clinical executive directors are interpreting and responding to the extensive reforms and restructuring in the UK health service.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon detailed research in two very large teaching hospital organizations in order to understand how actors crucial to the delivery of this vision are responding. Schedule‐structured interviews with executive directors were conducted, recorded, transcribed and coded.

Findings

The clinical and non‐clinical directors of these organizations engaged in a process of active sense‐making are found, which is leading to significant changes to the service and also changes to identity. The clinical directors are revealing a willingness to assume accountability for devolved profit centres in their service lines. The non‐clinical directors are supportive of this idea in broad terms but are cautious about releasing “too much” central control.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on just two case studies and the analyses are made through the perspectives of the executive teams in each case.

Practical implications

Changes to healthcare environments of this kind are occurring in many countries, but such is the extent and intensity of these changes in the UK that the government's aspiration is high – it sees this set of reforms leading to a peerless world class health service. The way in which the actors make sense of and navigate their way through the cross cutting principles and the layered reforms is a critical issue.

Originality/value

There have been few systematic studies of the practical reality involved in the enactment of profit centre and service line management initiatives in acute hospital settings and the ways these are understood and negotiated at executive team level.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Meagan Crethar, Jan Phillips and Paula Brown

This paper is a descriptive case study which seeks to outline how leadership development is being utilised across Queensland Health (Queensland Department of Health…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a descriptive case study which seeks to outline how leadership development is being utilised across Queensland Health (Queensland Department of Health, Australia) to achieve improvements in workplace culture and ultimately improvements in clinical care and patient outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Queensland Health has been implementing a comprehensive organisation‐wide suite of leadership development programs since 2006. This includes a range of specific leadership development programs conducted over a period of time for clinical and non‐clinical staff. It also includes specialist leadership development workshops of shorter duration, online leadership modules, web‐based support, executive coaching and 360‐degree feedback. The programs are based upon experiential learning which engages participants in critical thinking and self‐reflection based upon in‐context experiences relevant to themselves. Ongoing leadership program development has been evidence‐based and identified through 360‐degree feedback outcomes, staff opinion survey outcomes and program evaluation outcomes.

Findings

The 360‐degree feedback survey results of participants have improved. This demonstrates that the leadership development programs have impacted positively on participants' workplace behaviour. The culture and climate survey results have improved which demonstrates positive cultural change has taken place. The programs have been evaluated very highly by participants.

Originality/value

This is one of the most comprehensive and innovative leadership development initiatives ever undertaken within the Australian health sector, with over 10,000 participants to date.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article

Denise Irene Deppoliti, Denise Côté-Arsenault, Gina Myers, Jennifer Barry, Connie Randolph and Brendan Tanner

Schwartz Center Rounds® (SCRs) bring multidisciplinary caregivers together to discuss authentic patient cases from the social and emotional perspective. The monthly…

Abstract

Purpose

Schwartz Center Rounds® (SCRs) bring multidisciplinary caregivers together to discuss authentic patient cases from the social and emotional perspective. The monthly sessions provide a forum to share personal thoughts and feelings. The purpose of this paper is to learn why people attend SCR, understand what is gained from the experience, and identify key elements to use in measuring the program’s effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative descriptive study used four focus groups and three telephone interviews for data collection. Purposive sampling resulted in a multidisciplinary sample of 30 participants. Thematic analysis was conducted with complete transcripts by all researchers.

Findings

All parties viewed SCR as beneficial. Six themes emerged during data analysis: culture change, exposing emotions, walking in another’s shoes, inequality of topics, influence of rules and boundaries, and personal impact. Institutional culture was positively influenced through SCR.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include a single institution and restricted data gathered from physicians. Future research should focus on identifying outcome measures to evaluate the long-term impact of SCR on healthcare organizations.

Practical implications

This study confirms that the SCR program should be continued at the study organization, and expanded to increase availability to all staff. The growth of this program in healthcare organizations across the country is encouraged.

Originality/value

This research provides support for healthcare organizations to offer SCR and highlights how the emotional aspects of patient care can be acknowledged, explored, and discussed.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Daryl May and Louise Smith

In the year 2000, the UK government promoted the concept that hospital services be shaped around the needs of the patient to make their stay in hospital as comfortable as…

Abstract

In the year 2000, the UK government promoted the concept that hospital services be shaped around the needs of the patient to make their stay in hospital as comfortable as possible and advocated the introduction of a ward housekeeper role in at least 50 per cent of hospitals by 2004. This is a ward‐based non‐clinical role centred on cleaning, food service and maintenance to ensure that the basics of care are right for the patient. In 2002 the Facilities Management Graduate Centre at Sheffield Hallam University completed a series of six case studies looking at the role within different NHS Trusts. These were developed through interviews and observations with the facilities manager, ward housekeepers and nursing staff and also by collecting documentary evidence such as job descriptions, financial details and training information. Common themes were identified, relating to experiences of developing and implementing the ward housekeeper role. This paper suggests models of best practice relating to role, recruitment, induction, training, integration and management.

Details

Facilities, vol. 21 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article

Frederick O'Dell and Hugh Preston

The purpose of this study is to investigate reasons for non‐use of a UK hospital library service and under‐utilisation by some groups of staff. The context is the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate reasons for non‐use of a UK hospital library service and under‐utilisation by some groups of staff. The context is the increasing role of evidence‐based clinical and non‐clinical activity in the health sector and requirements for professional development.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposive sample survey of staff groups in an acute services, teaching and district general hospital (DGH) is carried out. Three core themes for non‐use of hospital libraries are identified from the literature and the survey findings are evaluated in accordance with those themes using quantitative and qualitative evidence.

Findings

The evaluation demonstrates that the three selected themes of ignorance of service, not having a need and perceived bar on access are based on shortcomings in library promotion and hospital staff members' assumptions about access and benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Selection of specific non‐use factors within a larger list from previous studies enables a focus on issues that have previously been less fully investigated. The limited scale of the research indicates the value of a further larger scale survey.

Practical implications

The findings could help health sector libraries to improve service delivery and increase the number of library users.

Originality/value

The selected themes have only been previously investigated in broader studies and not in the specific detail of the current study. The study focuses on perception of service benefit as well as practical issues of access and so can be of value to hospital library managers in their aim of achieving or endorsing a role within the core hospital ethos.

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article

Sara Melo

Research on accreditation has mostly focused on assessing its impact using large scale quantitative studies, yet little is known on how quality is improved in practice…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on accreditation has mostly focused on assessing its impact using large scale quantitative studies, yet little is known on how quality is improved in practice through an accreditation process. Using a case study of an acute teaching hospital in Portugal, the purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamics through which accreditation can lead to an improvement in the quality of healthcare services provided.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the case study was collected through 46 in-depth semi-structured interviews with 49 clinical and non-clinical members of staff. Data were analyzed using a framework thematic analysis.

Findings

Interviewees felt that hospital accreditation contributed to the improvement of healthcare quality in general, and more specifically to patient safety, as it fostered staff reflection, a higher standardization of practices, and a greater focus on quality improvement. However, findings also suggest that the positive impact of accreditation resulted from the approach the hospital adopted in its implementation as well as the fact that several of the procedures and practices required by accreditation were already in place at the hospital, albeit often in an informal way.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in only one hospital. The design of an accreditation implementation plan tailored to the hospital’s context can significantly contribute to positive outcomes in terms of quality and patient safety improvements.

Originality/value

This study provides a better understanding of how accreditation can contribute to healthcare quality improvement. It offers important lessons on the factors and processes that potentiate quality improvements through accreditation.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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