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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Chimaobi Okere

From the heaps of garbage in street corners and highways, to blocked drains and obstructed waterways, Nigerian cities continue to bear marks of environmental degradation…

Abstract

From the heaps of garbage in street corners and highways, to blocked drains and obstructed waterways, Nigerian cities continue to bear marks of environmental degradation occasioned by the business activities of manufacturers. Globally, the picture is no less different as landfills, oceans and beaches bear indubitable testimonies of plastic pollution. While the manufacturers smile to the bank, governments and municipal authorities struggle with their meagre resources to combat the colossal burden of plastic pollution they generated in the course of creating wealth. The use of non-biodegradable materials such as polythene in product packaging is the primary driver of manufacturing-induced environmental degradation in Nigerian cities and other cities of the world. Recent developments in commerce in Nigeria, such as the emergence of the mobile supermarket, are responsible for the geometric increase in street filthiness in the country. Developing strategic alliances amongst Nigerian manufacturers or between manufacturers and municipal authorities is key in ensuring a healthy environment while doing business. However, such alliances must take a clue from the Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) embodied in the environmental consciousness practised in local markets in Nigeria, hereafter referred to as the ‘market-place model’ for environmental stewardship. This model, when replicated in other economies across the globe, would significantly reduce the global burden of plastic wastes and the hazards they pose in the environment. Conscience repayment, provision of refuse collection points, recycling and green packaging are part of ways of operationalising this model in everyday business. Adopting the market-place model in building strategic alliances for environmental stewardship would afford Nigerian manufacturers, and indeed global manufacturers, financial and non-financial business benefits such as cost savings through eco-efficiency, enlightened self-interest and good corporate image.

Details

Stakeholders, Governance and Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-380-3

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Case study
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Mini Mathur and Smita P. Kothari

Help students understand Porter’s five forces framework. Explore and analyze possible growth strategies using the Ansoff matrix.

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Help students understand Porter’s five forces framework. Explore and analyze possible growth strategies using the Ansoff matrix.

Case overview/synopsis

This case study integrates lessons in growth strategies, Porter’s five forces and the Ansoff matrix. Vijay Kothari, Founder of Wealth out of Waste (WOW) is in a fix. In spite of functioning in an environment of abundant demand and potential, he is unable to perform in his optimum capacity because of operational and manpower-related issues. WOW, which turned nine in 2019, is a sort of monopoly in the organized business of scheduled collection of recyclable trash. WOW is operating in a 2% market with 98% being captured by traditional “pastiwalas.” From the current waiting period of up to seven days, Kothari wants to service any area in the city of Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India within 2 h. To achieve this objective, how should Kothari overcome the growth challenge in the business.

Complexity academic level

Undergraduate and postgraduate.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

R. Lalitha S. Fernando

Improper waste management has been a serious issue in many countries, thus, home composting is considered as an effective method in solid waste management (SWM). Based on…

Abstract

Purpose

Improper waste management has been a serious issue in many countries, thus, home composting is considered as an effective method in solid waste management (SWM). Based on qualitative research methods, this study explores peoples' motives to choose composting and main problems confronted by them in home composting in Kaduwela and Moratuwa municipalities in the Western Province of Sri Lanka and proposes policy measures to improve home compositing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was mainly based on qualitative research methods. A convenient sample of 40 households including 20 households from each municipal council (MC) has been selected using semi-structured interviews. Descriptive methods were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Citizens have chosen to compost mainly, for gardening, the influence of local authorities, economic benefits and environmental and health concerns. Fear of potential health problems, lack of resources, problems caused by animals, problems related to compost bins, limited knowledge and awareness about composting are difficulties encountered during home composting. Providing compost bins to people at a concessionary price or for free of charge, providing required facilities and financial assistance, promoting people's positive attitudes and awareness, encouraging the use of compost in households, improving the standard of composting and making relevant legal and institutional arrangements to promote people's participation in home composting are suggested for encouraging home composting.

Research limitations/implications

This study used a small sample, which is the main limitation of this study.

Practical implications

The policy implication will help to improve composting solid waste practices of the Local Governments.

Originality/value

There is a lack of research on composting related to the selected municipalities. As composting is an effective method in SWM, the findings and the proposed policy measures of this study will help to improve the SWM of the Local Governments of Sri Lanka.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

M. Zafar and B.J. Alappat

Unfortunately in India, most landfills are located along the banks of rivers flowing through the cities. The interaction of two big, diverse and delicate ecological…

Abstract

Unfortunately in India, most landfills are located along the banks of rivers flowing through the cities. The interaction of two big, diverse and delicate ecological systems – rivers and landfills – has been investigated in this paper. During 2000, the estimated quantity of waste generation was more than 9,000 tons per day. This is one of the biggest sources of environmental degradation in Delhi, India's capital. It contributes to river pollution in a significant way through landfill leachate and runoff, especially during the rainy season. Since the 1950s over 12 large landfills have been packed with all sorts of non‐biodegradable and toxic wastes from Delhi. The area covered by landfills is at least 1 percent (14.83 sq.km) of Delhi's total area. All the landfill sites except Tilak Nagar, Hastal and Chattarpur are located close (0‐6 km) to the river Yamuna. Further, these landfills are not engineered sanitary landfills and the waste is dumped at open sites without proper compaction. A high mountain of waste can be seen at all landfill sites without a cover. The leachate produced by landfills finally percolates to the porous ground surface at the landfills or finds its way to nearby drains. A large portion of landfill leachate and runoff produced by these landfill sites finally reaches the Yamuna through ground water flow or surface water flow through the drains. The results of analysis by investigations and environmental mapping during the study clearly indicate that river water quality is affected by the presence of landfill locations, i.e. landfill leachate and landfill surface runoff.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2021

Abbas Ahmad Adamu, Norazilawati Muhamad Sarih and Seng Neon Gan

Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) waste from soft drink bottles was incorporated into palm olein alkyd to produce new polyol for use in polyurethane resins as surface…

Abstract

Purpose

Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) waste from soft drink bottles was incorporated into palm olein alkyd to produce new polyol for use in polyurethane resins as surface protection on metal surfaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Alkyd was prepared from palm olein, glycerol and phthalic anhydride. PET underwent simultaneous glycolysis and transesterification reactions with the alkyd. Varying the amount of PET has led to polyols with different viscosities. Polyurethane resins were produced by reacting the polyols with toluene diisocyanate. The resins were coated on mild steel panels and cured. Performances of the cured films were tested.

Findings

The polyurethanes (PU) resin cured to a harder film with better thermal stability. Films showed excellent adhesion properties, while higher content of PET exhibited higher pencil hardness, better water, salt, acid and alkali resistance.

Research limitations/implications

Other vegetable oils could also be used. The alkyd structure could be changed by formulation to have different functionality and the ability to incorporate higher amount of PET waste. Rate of glycolysis of PET could be increased by higher amount of ethylene glycol.

Practical implications

This method has managed to use waste PET in producing new polyol and PU resins. The cured films exhibit good mechanical and chemical properties, as well as excellent adhesion and thermal stability.

Social implications

The non-biodegradable PET has created environmental pollution problems connected to littering and illegal landfilling. It has become necessary to pay greater attention to recycling PET bottles for obtaining valuable products.

Originality/value

This approach is different from the earlier reports, where PET was recycled to recover the raw materials.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Barbara Harriss-White

The purpose of this paper is to contribute original evidence about the conditions for formal and informal contracts for commodities and labour in the waste economy of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute original evidence about the conditions for formal and informal contracts for commodities and labour in the waste economy of a South Indian town.

Design/methodology/approach

Field research was exploratory, based on snowball sampling and urban traversing. The analysis follows capital and labour in the sub-circuits of capital generating waste in production, distribution, consumption, the production of labour and the reproduction of society.

Findings

Regardless of legal regulation, which is selectively enforced, formal contracts are limited to active inspection regimes; direct transactions with or within the state; and long-distance transactions. Formal labour contracts are least incomplete for state employment, and for relatively scarce skilled labour in the private sector.

Research limitations/implications

The research design does not permit quantified generalisations.

Practical implications

Waste management technology evaluations neglect the social costs of displacing a large informal labour force.

Social implications

While slowly dissolving occupational barriers of untouchability, the waste economy is a low-status labour absorber of last resort, exit from which is extremely difficult.

Originality/value

The first systematic exploration of formal and informal contracts in an Indian small-town waste economy.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Case study
Publication date: 18 January 2019

Anupama Prashar

The case helps to introduce some of the elements of strategic management process, which are vital for competitive advantage, particularly for the public utility services…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The case helps to introduce some of the elements of strategic management process, which are vital for competitive advantage, particularly for the public utility services such as MSWM. It intends to achieve the following objectives: analyse the external environment for MSWM industry in India; analyse the internal organizational environment for a firm’s strategic competitiveness; introduce the concept of value and value chain understand the role of Stakeholder groups; understand the concept of public–private partnerships (PPP); and understand the role of technology in sustaining a competitive advantages.

Case overview/synopsis

This case focuses on entrepreneurial venture of Gaurav Sharma and his team who intend to transform the landscape of Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) industry in the country. THANKYOU (letsthankyou.com) is a Jaipur, India-based enterprise offering waste management solutions across different verticals. It was founded in 2016, following an opportunity in the waste management industry unleashed by the Government of India’s (GOI) new MSWM 2016 rules making it mandatory for the waste generators to manage (segregate, process, transport and disposal) their own waste. After initial examination of MSWM service scenario in the country, Gaurav and his two team members realize that a lack of integration among the multiple entities of waste management value chain is the root cause of the current poor state of affairs. So, they come up with an online marketplace, which offers a one-stop solution for the waste management of general households, residential settings and corporate. With initial projects implemented in the decentralized mode offering unit-level services such as door-to-door waste collection, on-demand waste pick-up and waste audits for corporate, the company has eventually got an opportunity of working on a centralized MSWM project for a leading hotel. Indeed, the company has the first mover advantage of entering the government controlled MSWM industry. However, to move forward, the THANKYOU team must address some fundamental issues in the industry: How to integrate the informal and formal sectors involved in waste management to achieve economies of scale? How to make land-filling the least preferred option of waste management? How to use technology to enhance the efficiency of MSWM value chain?

Complexity academic level

The case can add value to a course on strategic management at the post-graduate level. It highlights the role of external and internal environment analyses in the formulation of business strategy, ultimately leading to a firm’s strategic competitiveness. In a strategic management course, the case can be used to discuss introductory topics such as the analysis of internal and external environment; value creation by leveraging internal resources and capabilities; analysis of a firm’s dependence on its stakeholder groups; ascertainment of the profitability driver for a firm’s business model; and the concept of PPP.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2010

Abstract

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Abstract

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Iftekhar Ahmed and Darryn McEvoy

After the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, major resettlement programmes were implemented in the affected countries including Sri Lanka and India. New settlements were built…

Abstract

Purpose

After the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, major resettlement programmes were implemented in the affected countries including Sri Lanka and India. New settlements were built from scratch on vacant land, which consisted of building new houses and provision of infrastructure and services. Some of these programmes in Sri Lanka and India were reviewed in an Australian Research Council (ARC) funded research and this paper presents and analyses some of the findings of the research. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on interviews of residents and representatives of agencies involved in planning and implementing the resettlement programmes, and on-site observations. The investigation examined critical aspects of settlement development including site planning, transport, drainage, water supply, sanitation, waste management and security.

Findings

Very little site planning guidelines were available specifically for resettlement programmes; in both the case study countries, general planning guidelines were applied. Provision and management of infrastructure and services presents great challenges in developing countries as high capital investment and good technical skills for design, implementation and maintenance are required. Some of the resettlement schemes had the advantage of being centrally located and hence had access to schools, health centres and other facilities. However, others were in isolated locations and beneficiaries faced problems in accessing basic facilities. Drainage was a problem – most schemes did not have any surface drainage plan; low areas had not been elevated, slopes not levelled, and land not compacted before construction. Electricity and water supply had been provided in all the programmes, but conditions and quality varied. In many of the schemes, sanitation presented a problem. However, in Chennai, the sewage system worked well and this was one achievement all interview respondents praised. Solid waste management and security posed additional problems.

Originality/value

In the global context of increasing frequency and intensity of disasters due to climate change, adequate planning and implementation of reconstruction and resettlement programmes has become more important than ever. In this regard, the lessons gained in this paper should be of value and can provide guidance to post-disaster resettlement programmes in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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