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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Afshan Azam

This study aims to investigate the determinant factors that consumers may consider in buying halal packaged food produced by non-Muslim manufacturers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the determinant factors that consumers may consider in buying halal packaged food produced by non-Muslim manufacturers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a seven-constructs-based model. Halal awareness, Islamic brand and product ingredients are used as the pre-determined factors for measuring consumer’s purchase intention.

Findings

The hypotheses which were tested using partial least squares have revealed that halal awareness and product ingredients have significantly influenced Muslims’ intention to buy halal packaged food that are produced by non-Muslim manufacturers. The findings show that the religious belief, exposure and certification/logo are potential sources of Muslim awareness about halal packaged food from non-Muslim manufacturers.

Research limitations/implications

This research is also not exempted from its limitations. The data collected for the current study investigate general purchase toward halal products. It would be interesting if future researchers examine consumers’ purchase intention toward specific halal products for specific product categories. A comparative study is also worthy of being steered, as such a study is beneficial for producers and marketers of the halal industry.

Practical implications

As an overall implication, this study will provide a valuable and important information for non-Muslim halal packaged food manufacturers in identifying the appropriate strategy to fulfill the needs and wants of Muslim consumers at best. It is sufficed to suggest that the Muslim community has adopted halal food from non-Islamic brands as part of their lifestyle choice. Clearly, this gives implications to non-Muslim halal food producers. Thus, it is critical for food manufacturers to increase the level of awareness toward halal products by providing sufficient and interesting information, especially on halal certification. Hence, the manufacturer must take the opportunity to do intensive promotion to encourage more consumers to purchase their products.

Originality/value

This paper examines consumer purchase intention toward non-Muslim packed food manufactures in Saudi Arabia. It is critical for non-Muslim packed halal food manufacturers to increase the level of awareness toward halal products by providing sufficient and interesting information, especially on halal certification.

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Abdalla Mohamed Bashir

The purpose of this paper is to identify and investigate the awareness level of non-Muslim consumers to purchasing halal food products. Research on the non-Muslim consumers

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and investigate the awareness level of non-Muslim consumers to purchasing halal food products. Research on the non-Muslim consumers’ awareness towards purchasing halal food products is poorly understood so far in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study was adopted to explore new points of views about a particular issue, which is unknown, or not much known about it, to formulate ideas or propositions. Semi-structured interviews were the major primary data collection method. Four non-Muslim consumers from different settings purposively were selected. Thematic data analysis procedures were used.

Findings

The study found that non-Muslim consumers in Cape Town have a positive awareness of halal food, including its benefits and the production processes involved in producing it. The study also concluded that halal is not merely a commercial name using as a trademark in the global market. However, halal has several dimensions; primarily, for non-Muslim consumers, it is a mark of health and hygiene. With regard to psychological aspect, halal is considered as a sign of trust, comfortable and safe. It gives consumers a peace of mind when they consume food products that carry the halal label.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations in the study should be acknowledged. The main limitation of the study is that a small sample size was selected for this study. Another limitation is that the study was only conducted in the city of Cape Town.

Originality/value

This is the first qualitative study of its kind that presents an empirical evidence about the awareness of the non-Muslim consumers towards purchasing halal food products in South Africa, in general, and in Cape Town, in particular.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Joseph Mbawuni and Simon Gyasi Nimako

This study aims to examine consumer perception of introduction of Islamic banking (IB) in Ghana, which is a new and emerging form of banking in many non-Islamic countries.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine consumer perception of introduction of Islamic banking (IB) in Ghana, which is a new and emerging form of banking in many non-Islamic countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical field data were collected from a sample of 975 respondents using self-administered structured questionnaire. Descriptive analysis was conducted using SPSS version 16.

Findings

Muslim respondents have significantly positive perceptions of IB compared to non-Muslims and have stronger intentions to adopt IB in Ghana than non-Muslims. Non-Muslims have high perceived benefit of IB. Non-Muslim respondents do not perceive potential threat of violence associated with the introduction of IB in Ghana. Although non-Muslims perceive IB that would make Islam popular, they do not perceive it as a means of Islamizing bank customers. Relatively, non-Muslims appear to have low knowledge of IB, unfavourable attitude towards IB, are reluctant to comply with Sharia law and consequently have weaker intentions to adopt IB.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to descriptive analysis and to only Ghana. Future research should quantitatively model IB adoption and switching factors using samples from other developing countries.

Practical implications

IB institutions could focus on attracting a niche of Muslim consumers at its initial stages. Moreover, to facilitate the introduction of IB, the Bank of Ghana and other relevant stakeholders, in addition to establishing effective governance structures, must promote consumer education to enhance consumer knowledge of IB and correct misconceptions about IB among consumers, particularly non-Muslim customers.

Originality/value

One unique contribution of this study is that it provides an initial empirical exploration of consumers’ attitude and perceptions of IB in Ghana, which is an under-researched area.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Arun Kumar Tarofder, Umme Salma Sultana, Raisal Ismail, Suha Fouad Salem and Adiza Alhassan Musah

The purpose of this study is two-fold: classifying non-Muslim halal fashion buyers by applying quantitative techniques and identifying the persuading determinants of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is two-fold: classifying non-Muslim halal fashion buyers by applying quantitative techniques and identifying the persuading determinants of the non-Muslim women’ halal fashion buying behaviour (HFBB).

Design/methodology/approach

By adapting items from prior studies, a structured questionnaire was developed and distributed face-to-face to various Muslim fashion stores in Malaysia. After a one-month effort, 221 responses were obtained from non-Muslim consumers by using convenience sampling. Next, a clustering analysis was used to classify them from a contrasting perspective. Finally, regression and Andrew F. Hayes’s process procedures were applied to examine the three independent variables’ effect and the moderating variables.

Findings

The results revealed the characteristic behaviour of the non-Muslim women explicitly, which is related to their halal fashion purchasing decision. Based on the ANOVA results, there were different motives for buying halal fashion by non-Muslim women. Additionally, it was found that the most crucial determinants for non-Muslim’s HFBB are “cultural adaptation”, albeit, there is no substantial proof of a significant moderating effect of age and income on the consumers.

Research limitations/implications

These discoveries are advantageous for halal fashion retailers and provide an appealing domain for further investigations in the context of the global halal study.

Practical implications

This study provided an idea for an untapped segment on the halal fashion sellers’ segmentation and positioning strategy. The study’s results suggested specific managerial and practical recommendation that the sellers can use to attract non-Muslim consumers.

Originality/value

This study was amongst the uncommon investigations within the halal fashion context that will enlighten the managers’ selling strategy on the most neglected market segment. The results of this study provided an empirical understanding of how to sell halal fashion to non-Muslim consumers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Stephen Wilkins, Muhammad Mohsin Butt, Farshid Shams and Andrea Pérez

International restaurant and fast food chains such as KFC, McDonald’s and Subway currently serve halal food in some non-Muslim countries, with mixed results. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

International restaurant and fast food chains such as KFC, McDonald’s and Subway currently serve halal food in some non-Muslim countries, with mixed results. The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors that most influence the product judgements of halal food amongst non-Muslim consumers in non-Muslim countries and to assess the extent to which these judgements are related to willingness to consume halal food.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey method was adopted, using a total sample of 1,100 consumers in Canada, Spain and the UK. The proposed model was tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results suggest that it may be possible for firms to satisfy specific niche market segments with standardised mass market products. Consumer cosmopolitanism and non-Muslim religious identity were found to be positively related to halal product judgement, and consumer ethnocentrism and national identification were negatively related to halal product judgement. There was a strong relationship between product judgement and willingness to consume halal food.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that halal marketing may provide promising business opportunities for international restaurant and fast food chains, as well as food manufacturers and retailers. However, in countries or regions where there are many consumers with high levels of national identification or consumer ethnocentrism, firms should not expect non-target consumers to accept halal products.

Originality/value

This is the first study to suggest that, in non-Muslim countries, food companies may switch entirely to halal produce for certain products as an effective market segmentation strategy targeting Muslim consumers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Dg Ku Zunaidah Ag Majid, Suhaila Abdul Hanan and Hazlinda Hassan

The halal industry has been growing in recent years, seeing an increasing demand for halal products from both Muslim and non-Muslim consumers and acknowledging that halal…

Abstract

Purpose

The halal industry has been growing in recent years, seeing an increasing demand for halal products from both Muslim and non-Muslim consumers and acknowledging that halal is a universal concept accepted by both Muslim and non-Muslim societies. Service-related providers, such as logistics, could influence the demand for halal products by consumers. This paper aims to investigate the factors that influence consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for halal logistics among young non-Muslim adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of survey questions were distributed to young non-Muslim adults and 280 questionnaires were analysed.

Findings

The results indicate that three independent variables had a direct relationship and significant influence on the WTP for halal logistics among non-Muslim consumers. These variables are concern on halal, knowledge about halal and perception of halal logistics. Meanwhile, the awareness of halal logistics significantly influenced the consumers' WTP for halal logistics, provided that it was mediated by the perception of halal logistics.

Originality/value

Given the gap in research on halal logistics and WTP, this paper presents a consolidated examination of this subject, particularly the WTP of young non-Muslim adults. Furthermore, by including the perception of halal logistics as a mediator, this study leverages the halal logistics knowledge to a new level, thus deepening the understanding of this topic and contributing additional knowledge. This study also presents some opportunities for future empirical research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Sasiwemon Sukhabot and Zulfiqar Ali Jumani

This study aims to discuss the influence of Islamic brand attitude, Islamic brand knowledge and Islamic brand health advantages over the consumption behaviour towards…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to discuss the influence of Islamic brand attitude, Islamic brand knowledge and Islamic brand health advantages over the consumption behaviour towards Islamic brands among non-Muslims and tests the subjective norm (Muslim friends and family members) moderating role.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested by adopting the PLS-SEM testing methodology after collecting data by using the convenient sampling technique. Total 497 responses were used for data analysis.

Findings

The findings indicated that the non-Muslims of Thailand are influenced by the Islamic brand knowledge and Islamic brand health advantages.

Research limitations/implications

This work examines the non-Muslims who are buying an Islamic brand, and they are the consumers and users of it.

Practical implications

These results guide future researchers and organisations to strategies accordingly to motivate non-Muslim consumers towards the Islamic brands.

Originality/value

The research presents the construction of a model for understanding Islamic brand attitudes plus its components and as well as the moderating role of subjective norm between Islamic brand attitudes and consumption behaviours of non-Muslims of Thailand towards Islamic brand.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Norazah Mohd Suki

This study aims to distinguish between Muslim and non-Muslim consumers regarding celebrity influence on brands and purchase intention, and assess the relative importance…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to distinguish between Muslim and non-Muslim consumers regarding celebrity influence on brands and purchase intention, and assess the relative importance of celebrity credibility, in terms of physical attractiveness, trustworthiness, expertise and product–brand congruency. The study also researches attitudes towards brands, and purchase intention and their ability to predict consumers’ religion.

Design/methodology/approach

The research aim was achieved through an empirical study involving a self-administered questionnaire distributed to members of the public recruited from the Federal Territory of Labuan, Malaysia. Data were collected from 250 Muslim and non-Muslim consumers using a convenience sampling method. Their participation was purely voluntary. Multiple discriminant analysis via Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) computer program version 20 was used to answer the research questions.

Findings

Empirical results of the multiple discriminant analysis indicated that celebrity expertise and attitudes towards brands strongly predict allocation to Muslim consumers rather than non-Muslim consumers. The relative importance of the celebrity credibility aspects from Muslim consumers’ perspectives was: celebrity expertise, celebrity attitudes towards brands, purchase intention, product–brand congruency and physical attractiveness. Muslim consumers are found to choose expertise but not trustworthiness. Muslim consumers’ faith or trust may be linked to the perception that products and services endorsed by the celebrities are in line with Shariah principles which are consistent with Islamic principles.

Research limitations/implications

Respondents were randomly drawn from the Muslim and non-Muslim population of the Federal Territory of Labuan, Malaysia. Consequently, they may not represent the entire population of Malaysia. Future researchers could overcome the limits of generalizability by increasing sample coverage.

Originality/value

The paper empirically justified the discriminating function among celebrity credibility elements in terms of physical attractiveness, trustworthiness, expertise, and product–brand congruency of Muslim and non-Muslim consumer attitudes towards brands and purchase intention. Thus, the results of this study offer a new forward motion to the findings of prior studies on consumer perception of celebrity credibility, which is not much covered in the literature in the Malaysian context between Muslim and non-Muslim consumer perspectives. The findings are able to add literature on Muslim consumer behaviour in the use of celebrities, as these celebrities could act as inspirational to the consumers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Mohammad Mominul Islam

This study aims to reveal how consumers and shoppers are negative toward alcohol, animal fat, producers and certification issues concerned with halal cosmetics products.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reveal how consumers and shoppers are negative toward alcohol, animal fat, producers and certification issues concerned with halal cosmetics products.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 527 students of 4 public universities and a medical college across Bangladesh took part in a survey and 150 shoppers from 2 cities participated in the face to face interview with the structured questionnaires. Frequency distribution was used for categorical and numerical data, and the chi-square test with a binary logistic regression model has tested the association between gender and attitudes toward halal cosmetics. Besides, narratives of Sharīʿah regarding alcohol, meat, fat and halal certification have helped understand the halal issue.

Findings

In total, 83% of the respondents perceived negative attitudes against haram animal fat followed by alcohol (74%) and animal fat (64%). The chi-square test shows that consumers held a significant association toward haram animal fat, (p-value 0.000) alcohol, (p-value 0.000) non-Muslim producers (p-value 0.000) and non-Muslim countries (p-value 0.026). Imperatively, the binary logistic regression model has found a significant negative association to haram animal fat (ß2 −0.295) and alcohol (ß1 −0.200).

Practical implications

Marketers ought to avoid haram animal fat in halal cosmetics besides focusing on alcohol freeness. Also, non-Muslim marketers need to be extra cautious in showcasing their identities. However, Islamic marketers will enjoy a competitive advantage in the halal market because of their demographic factors.

Social implications

Islamic principles on alcohol, meat, fat and certification potentially can help other stakeholders sense the halal norms.

Originality/value

This study has blended the elements of Sharīʿah with empirical evidence to shed light on the fundamental and trust factors for the marketing of halal cosmetics products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Suzanna ElMassah and Heba Abou-El-Sood

As the popularity of Islamic banking and financial instruments continues to rise globally, a recurring empirical question is what specifically makes consumers choose…

Abstract

Purpose

As the popularity of Islamic banking and financial instruments continues to rise globally, a recurring empirical question is what specifically makes consumers choose Islamic banking. This paper aims to investigate the determinants of bank type selection, especially in culturally diverse settings where the Islamic banking sector is well-established. It further examines whether consumers’ gender/religion influences their choices. One intuitive prediction is that Muslim consumers opt for Islamic banking products as “ethical” because of conviction-related reasons. However, the reality is not necessarily straightforward.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses structural equation modeling to examine data collected from a survey questionnaire of 790 respondents in an emerging market setting. Further analysis is made based on gender and religion to remove related bias.

Findings

Results suggest that overall consumer awareness significantly affects the selection of Islamic banking products. The positive effect of awareness is more significant for Muslim consumers relative to non-Muslims. Interestingly, social stimuli and bank attributes have an insignificant effect on the banking choices of both Muslims and non-Muslims.

Practical implications

Results suggest that Islamic banks’ marketing managers should adopt differentiated strategies for men and women, focusing on the core benefits of the service or personal interactions with consumers, respectively, along with a focus on different aspects of personal service for each gender. Awareness should be enhanced by adopting informative and effective marketing strategies to attract and retain consumers in the competitive bank environment. Islamic banks (IB) should pay attention to the religious effect without considering it as the sole variable motivating potential customers. They should design segmented and customized marketing strategies based on gender-religion market segmentation to suit different groups’ needs.

Originality/value

The findings fill a gap in the literature and provide Islamic bankers with insights to help design and articulate their business strategies to appeal to consumers in a multicultural context. Examining an integral part of gender and religion mitigates biased estimates due to the omission of variables. The study contributes to the existing literature on customer preferences for IB with a relatively large, new data set.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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