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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Mary Dawson, Juan M. Madera and Jack A. Neal

One out of four foodservice employees speaks a foreign language at home. Furthermore, 37 percent of those employees speak limited English. Given this, hospitality managers…

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5163

Abstract

Purpose

One out of four foodservice employees speaks a foreign language at home. Furthermore, 37 percent of those employees speak limited English. Given this, hospitality managers must find ways to effectively communicate with their employees. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology employed a perspective‐taking manipulation. Participants were placed in the role of an individual that does not speak the native language that is used in the workplace. Groups were measured on performance, quality, and accuracy. Groups were video‐taped to measure frequency of non‐verbal behaviors. Participants were surveyed to measure their levels of positivity.

Findings

The results of this study identified effective non‐verbal communication strategies for managers (combination of gestures, demonstrating, and pointing). When the leader used these strategies, the groups were able to complete the recipes faster. Managers who spoke another language expressed a more positive behavior towards the group. The group also expressed more positive behaviors towards each other when they had a second language leader.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation is that data were collected from students and the methodology simulated an environment of limited language proficiency. Although this method has been shown to be effective, the true experiences of what non‐English speaking workers might face include more complex processes.

Practical implications

This research suggests that non‐verbal tools are effective when communication barriers exist. Managers who are multiculturally competent are more efficient in leading employees. Positive feedback must be given even if it is non‐verbal.

Originality/value

This research offers valuable strategies for hospitality managers to communicate with those employees who speak limited English.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Mark Gabbott and Gillian Hogg

Considers the role of non‐verbal communication in consumers’ evaluation of service encounters. Non‐verbal communication has been extensively studied in the psychology and…

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15469

Abstract

Considers the role of non‐verbal communication in consumers’ evaluation of service encounters. Non‐verbal communication has been extensively studied in the psychology and psychotherapy disciplines and has been shown to have a central effect on participants’ perceptions of an event. As services are essentially interpersonal interactions it follows that non‐verbal communication will play a major part in service evaluation. Uses an experimental methodology based on video scenarios to demonstrate the effect of this type of communication on consumers. The results indicate significant differences in respondents’ reactions to the scenario according to the non‐verbal behaviour of the service provider.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Frank Fitzpatrick

Abstract

Details

Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Alexis M. Elder

This paper aims to survey the moral psychology of emoji, time-restricted messaging and other non-verbal elements of nominally textual computer-mediated communication

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1590

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to survey the moral psychology of emoji, time-restricted messaging and other non-verbal elements of nominally textual computer-mediated communication (CMC). These features are increasingly common in interpersonal communication. Effects on both individual well-being and quality of intimate relationships are assessed. Results of this assessment are used to support ethical conclusions about these elements of digital communication.

Design/methodology/approach

Assessment of these non-verbal elements of CMC is framed in light of relevant literature from a variety of fields, including neuroscience, behavioral economics and social psychology. The resulting ethical analysis is informed by both Aristotelian and Buddhist virtue ethics.

Findings

This paper finds that emoji and other nonverbal elements of CMC have positive potential for individual well-being and interpersonal communication. They can be used to focus and direct attention, express and acknowledge difficult emotions and increase altruistic tendencies.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is conceptual, extrapolating from existing literature to investigate possibilities rather than reporting on novel experiments. It is not intended to substitute for empirical research on use patterns and their effects. But by identifying positive potential, it can help both users and designers to support individual and relational well-being.

Practical implications

The positive effects identified here can be incorporated into both design and use strategies for CMC.

Social implications

Situating ethical analysis of these trending technologies within literature from the social sciences on the effects of stylized faces, disappearing messages and directed attention can help us both understand their appeal to users and best practices for using them to enrich our social lives.

Originality/value

The paper uses empirically informed moral psychology to understand a deceptively trivial-looking phenomenon with wide-ranging impacts on human psychology and relationships.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

Sandra G. Garside and Brian H. Kleiner

Since the majority of our time is spent communicating with others,we must develop effective skills. The most important skill is theability to listen. This goes beyond just…

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3401

Abstract

Since the majority of our time is spent communicating with others, we must develop effective skills. The most important skill is the ability to listen. This goes beyond just giving the appearance of attention. We must be able to adopt the other person′s perspective in order to understand fully the message being sent. Because all meaning resides in people not in words, the ability to empathise with the sender is particularly valuable. The other significant aspect of communication is the non‐verbal message. Non‐verbal communication represents 55 per cent of the message and must be conveyed accurately in order to be effective. The verbal message must agree with the non‐verbal message if we are to have credibility. We must know ourselves, monitor our performance, and strive for accuracy and honesty in what we say and do. The rewards include more satisfying personal relationships and greater ease in accomplishing our personal goals.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2003

Michael W Preis, Salvatore F Divita and Amy K Smith

Missing in most of the research on selling has been an examination of the process from the point of view of the customer. When satisfaction in selling has been considered…

Abstract

Missing in most of the research on selling has been an examination of the process from the point of view of the customer. When satisfaction in selling has been considered, researchers have focused on the satisfaction of the salesperson with his job and/or the impact of this job satisfaction on performance (e.g. Bluen, Barling & Burns, 1990; Churchill, Ford & Walker, 1979; Pruden & Peterson, 1971). To concentrate on salesperson performance while neglecting customers is to ignore the most important half of the relationship between buyers and sellers and entirely disregards the marketing concept and the streams of research in customer satisfaction. This research takes a different approach and examines customers’ satisfaction with salespeople.

Details

Evaluating Marketing Actions and Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-046-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Toyoaki Nishida

Dynamic knowledge interaction is interaction that brings about mutual understanding and knowledge evolution in a community. Proposes a communication medium called…

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1616

Abstract

Dynamic knowledge interaction is interaction that brings about mutual understanding and knowledge evolution in a community. Proposes a communication medium called conversational medium that provides the user with a means for interacting with the content in a conversational fashion, and presents a traveling conversation model in which the community knowledge process is modeled as circulation of conversational contents that represent small talks in a community. Shows several pilot systems based on these ideas, including the public opinion channel which is an interactive broadcasting system that collects small talks and broadcasts stories reorganized from the archive of small talks; EgoChat which is a system based on a talking‐virtualized‐egos metaphor; Voice Café which is a system consisting of a physical object and a conversational agent that allows artifacts to make conversation with people or other artifacts; and embodiment communication for communicating more vivid information by introducing non‐verbal communication facilities.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Claudio Baccarani and Angelo Bonfanti

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of effective public speaking (EPS), and its antecedents and effects to provide a conceptual framework for the study of…

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7029

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of effective public speaking (EPS), and its antecedents and effects to provide a conceptual framework for the study of EPS in the field of corporate communication.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper whose analytical approach draws heavily on theoretical evidence published mainly in the corporate-communication literature.

Findings

Public speaking means communicating with rather than to the audience: it does not denote a one-way broadcasting of information but a conversation between the speaker and audience. Strong arguments (logos) presented in a credible (ethos) and exciting (pathos) manner form the basis of EPS. Delivering an interesting, appealing and engaging presentation (i.e. the antecedents of EPS) requires that public speakers combine skills of logic (i.e. public speaking as science) with an “outside-the-box” approach (i.e. public speaking as art). EPS produces positive effects in the professional growth of an organisation’s human resources, trust in corporate leadership, corporate-change process, motivation of human resources and corporate reputation.

Practical implications

Underestimating the importance of the preparation phase is a critical mistake in EPS performance. Communicating from the heart ensures the speaker achieves the objective to be heard and remembered by the audience. Developing storytelling skill helps to persuade listeners more effectively because they feel more involved in the discourse. It is important to remember that perfection is artificial and imperfection is natural. EPS requires a training oriented towards personal exploration. As such, companies should invest in public speaking courses that adopt techniques such as experiential theatre.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a conceptual framework which can be considered a first step towards compensating for the lack of studies of EPS because, although it does not claim to be thorough in any way, it should encourage future researchers to explore this area in greater depth.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Penny Benford and P Standen

This study builds on previous survey research by the investigators (Benford, 2008), as well as anecdotal reports, which imply that, despite having social interaction and…

Abstract

This study builds on previous survey research by the investigators (Benford, 2008), as well as anecdotal reports, which imply that, despite having social interaction and communication difficulties, internet communication (via email, chat rooms, newsgroups and bulletin boards) is welcomed by some people with high functioning autism (HFA) or Asperger syndrome (AS). Qualitative data about individual experiences, perceptions, and motivations regarding internet‐based communication was obtained from 23 adults with HFA or AS, mainly via email interviewing, but also by conventional mail. Analysis based on grounded theory revealed how the sample were able to use the internet to lessen the emotional, social and time pressures experienced in offline situations. Aspects that contributed to the perception of the internet as a potentially more comfortable communication medium included visual anonymity, a different and more flexible pace of communication, and the permanence of text. Overall, the complexity of communication was lessened, and a greater sense of control could be achieved.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Wayne A. Hollman and Brian H. Kleiner

Rapport is important in business. It can be described as a feeling you experience when you are with someone you intuitively like. And since so much of communication is…

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2370

Abstract

Rapport is important in business. It can be described as a feeling you experience when you are with someone you intuitively like. And since so much of communication is non‐verbal, rapport is often developed on more of a subconscious or subliminal level. There are many methods and ways to help establish and build rapport. Some of these are verbal, such as matching another’s rate of speech. But many are through non‐verbal communication, such as pacing, mirroring, leading, or study of another’s sensory perceptions. Contends that using these techniques in building rapport can help us in our personal relationships, and certainly has application in business as well.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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