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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Martin Power and Mary Jo Lavelle

In response to the challenge of the ageing of societies and concerns over recruitment and quality of service delivery, many nations have introduced new educational and…

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Abstract

Purpose

In response to the challenge of the ageing of societies and concerns over recruitment and quality of service delivery, many nations have introduced new educational and training pathways, as well as national standards that set a minimum qualification level for residential care staff. In Ireland, national standards were introduced in July 2009 and, against this backdrop this study aimed to explore the level of qualification held or being pursued by non‐nursing care staff.

Design/methodology/approach

An email/postal survey was conducted.

Findings

This survey revealed that while vocational qualifications were most common, more than 50 per cent of care staff neither held nor were pursuing the minimum qualification set by the standards.

Research limitations/implications

While the introduction of standards may address this situation, the workforce appears currently ill‐prepared for increasing professionalisation. Moreover, given Ireland's poor economic circumstances, training or supports are likely to be limited, with the burden of training liable to fall on staff, undermining morale and increasing already tense industrial relations. Limitations of this study include variations in the roles of non‐nursing care staff, with many staff classified as “multi‐task” staff that perform a range of duties from personal care through to more general domestic duties and, in the context of a mixed economy of provision, the abundance of responses from the public sector relative to the private sector.

Originality/value

Nonetheless, this study provides a timely snapshot and a reference point for further research around the impact of standards on quality of care or workforce professionalisation and it will be of particular interest to policymakers, regulators, employers and care staff.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Jane McCusker, Nandini Dendukuri, Linda Cardinal, Lilly Katofsky and Michael Riccardi

The purpose of this article is to investigate the performance of scales to assess the work environment of hospital professional staff, other than nurses or physicians.

1993

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to investigate the performance of scales to assess the work environment of hospital professional staff, other than nurses or physicians.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among professional (non‐nursing or medical) staff at a 300‐bed urban, university‐affiliated Canadian hospital. A total of 24 work environment items were adapted from a scale previously validated among nursing staff. Scales were developed based on a principal components analysis, and were compared among four groups of staff. The relationships between the scales and the following measures were then explored using univariate and multivariate analyses: satisfaction with the work environment, perceived quality of patient care, perceived frequency of patient/family complaints, work‐related injuries, and verbal abuse of staff.

Findings

The survey response rate was 154/200 (76.6 percent). Four scales were identified (with corresponding Cronbach's alpha), assessing the following aspects of the work environment: supervisory support (0.88), team‐work (0.84), professionalism (0.77), and interdisciplinary relations (0.64). In multivariate analyses, there were significant differences between the job groups in all four scales. One or more of the scales was significantly associated with overall satisfaction, perceived quality, and adverse incidents, even after adjustment for other staff characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include: the cross‐sectional design, subjective measurement of quality of care, small sample sizes in some groups of staff, and the single study site.

Practical implications

The scales developed in this study may be used by managers to assess hospital staff perceptions of the work environment.

Originality/value

The four proposed scales appear to measure meaningful aspects of the working environment that are important in determining overall satisfaction with the work environment and are related to quality of care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Jasmijn van Harten, Eva Knies and Peter Leisink

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine whether workers in various hospital job groups differ in their perceptions of the provision of managerial support…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine whether workers in various hospital job groups differ in their perceptions of the provision of managerial support, and of their up-to-date expertise (UDE), willingness to change (WTC) and employment opportunities (EO). Second, to examine whether and how the relationships between managerial support, workers’ UDE, WTC and their EO are moderated by hospital job type.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 1,764 employees of three Dutch hospitals. ANOVAs and structural equation modeling were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The research findings indicate significant differences between the hospital job groups with regard to UDE, WTC and EO. No support was found for differences on managerial support nor for a moderating effect of hospital job type. The latter means that the relationships of managerial support with workers’ UDE, WTC and EO are independent of job type.

Originality/value

Based on the findings, a classification system is constructed that shows how hospital workers’ UDE, WTC and EO can be explained by the combination of the educational level required by a job and its degree of specialization.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Robin Patric Clair and Rebekah L. Fox

The purpose of this study is to apply a rhetorical lens to the exploration of symbolic interactions used to negotiate contested identity. Specifically, we provide and…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to apply a rhetorical lens to the exploration of symbolic interactions used to negotiate contested identity. Specifically, we provide and analyze an Internet discussion among nurses concerning job duties and responsibilities. In this case study, one nurse questions her superior's remarks about her “abandoning” her responsibilities if she does not undertake “non-nursing” tasks. Ironically, the majority of posts that follow from other nurses perpetuate the notion that nurses must perform “non-nursing” tasks to fulfill their primary moral obligation and sustain an identity of nurses as flexible and caring. A rhetorical lens is applied and suggests that multiple framing techniques and rhetorical tactics (i.e., mutual negation, minimization, red herrings, sunny-side of domination, and perhaps most important the moral imperative) are used to persuade the nurse toward a collective identity – flexible professional. Although the main contribution of this study is found in the use of the rhetorical lens, an additional contribution is discussed – unexpected evidence, which suggests that the primary assumption of a “nursing shortage” may be a discursive reality, as well.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-156-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Nicola North and Frances Hughes

Recent New Zealand reports have identified the nursing workforce for its potential to make a significant contribution to increased productivity in health services. The…

3199

Abstract

Purpose

Recent New Zealand reports have identified the nursing workforce for its potential to make a significant contribution to increased productivity in health services. The purpose of this paper is to review critically the recent and current labour approaches to improve nursing productivity in New Zealand, in a context of international research and experience.

Design/methodology/approach

An examination of government documents regarding productivity, and a review of New Zealand and international literature and research on nursing productivity and its measurement form the basis of the paper.

Findings

It is found that productivity improvement strategies are influenced by theories of labour economics and scientific management that conceptualise a nurse as a labour unit and a cost to the organisation. Nursing productivity rose significantly with the health reforms of the 1990s that reduced nursing input costs but impacts on patient safety and nurses were negative. Current approaches to increasing nursing productivity, including the “productive ward” and reconfiguration of nursing teams, also draw on manufacturing innovations. Emerging thinking considers productivity in the context of the work environment and changing professional roles, and proposes reconceptualising the nurse as an intellectual asset to knowledge‐intensive health organisations.

Practical implications

Strategies that take a systems approach to nursing productivity, that view nursing as a capital asset, that focus on the interface between nurse and working environment and measure patient and nurse outcomes are advocated.

Originality/value

The paper shows that reframing nursing productivity brings into focus management strategies to raise productivity while protecting nursing and patient outcomes.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Margaret Owens and Keith Hurst

Embryonic work in the measurement of the quality of care in mental health units is presented. The main thrust of the article is an assessment of the relationship between…

Abstract

Embryonic work in the measurement of the quality of care in mental health units is presented. The main thrust of the article is an assessment of the relationship between patient dependency, nursing workload, and quality of patient care. A Psychiatric Nursing Audit is employed in an ongoing quality assurance programme and some preliminary findings are discussed along with the strengths and weaknesses of the method.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1974

LYNDA KING TAYLOR

As a conclusion to this series I want to include a mention on some of the work PA have been undertaking with hospital groups, particularly with the Sydney Hospital in…

Abstract

As a conclusion to this series I want to include a mention on some of the work PA have been undertaking with hospital groups, particularly with the Sydney Hospital in Australia. With the soaring costs of the National Health Services worldwide, in spite of many gaps in the service even in the developed countries, this study indicates the considerable potential for improving the value obtained for money spent by hospitals. The study also indicates that reduction in cost and improvements in efficiency came as by‐products to improving hospital management for the benefit of patients. To obtain these benefits there had to be considerable emphasis on training, education, encouragement and involvement. With these components, attitudes were slowly changed at all levels within the hospital.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 6 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Abstract

Details

Modelling Our Future: Population Ageing, Health and Aged Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-808-7

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 December 2021

Denise M. Cumberland, Andrea D. Ellinger and Tyra G. Deckard

The on-going COVID-19 pandemic has drastically impacted healthcare systems worldwide. Understanding the perspectives and insights of frontline healthcare workers caring

Abstract

Purpose

The on-going COVID-19 pandemic has drastically impacted healthcare systems worldwide. Understanding the perspectives and insights of frontline healthcare workers caring for and interacting with patients with COVID-19 represents a timely, topical, and important area of research. The purpose of this qualitative action research study was to assist one US healthcare system that has an expansive footprint with the implementation of a needs assessment among its frontline healthcare workers. The leadership within this healthcare system wanted to obtain a deeper understanding of how the COVID-19 pandemic was impacting the personal and professional lives of its workers. Further, the organisation wanted to solicit employees’ feedback about what they needed, understand the issues they were facing, and solicit their ideas to help the organisation know where to take action.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research employed 45 focus groups, referred to as virtual listening calls (LCs) in this organisation, which were held over a four-week period. A total of 241 nursing staff, representing healthcare facilities across the country, attended 26 of the LCs. A total of 19 LCs were held with 116 healthcare workers who are employed in other clinical roles (e.g. therapists) or administrative functions.

Findings

Extending beyond the available research at the time, this study was initiated from within a US healthcare system and informed by the frontline healthcare employees who participated in the LCs, the findings of this study include the perspectives of both nursing and other healthcare workers, the latter of which have not received considerable attention. The findings underscore that the COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on the personal and professional lives of all of these healthcare workers and has exacted an emotional toll as noted in other studies. However, this study also highlights the importance of listening to employees’ concerns, but more importantly, their recommendations for improving their experiences. Notably, the organisation is in the midst of making changes to address these frontline workers’ needs.

Originality/value

The study, inclusive of nursing and other healthcare staff, demonstrates how an organisation can adapt to a crisis by listening and learning from its frontline employees.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Peter Kellett, David M. Gregory and Joan Evans

In this paper, the authors situate existing scholarship about men in nursing within the broader gendered landscape of the profession and society. As a consequence, the…

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Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors situate existing scholarship about men in nursing within the broader gendered landscape of the profession and society. As a consequence, the need to reframe the discourse about men in nursing from the current emphasis on personal or collective experiences to collective action becomes apparent. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical synthesis of scholarship addressing men in nursing serves as the basis for a conceptual paper which challenges the existing discourse on men in nursing.

Findings

The experiences and careers of men in nursing are profoundly shaped by patriarchal power structures that situate caregiving within the realm of the feminine. Although men generally benefit in the context of patriarchal society, men in nursing are subject to a patriarchal paradox that marginalizes their performance of masculinity and situates them as unlikely caregivers. Therefore, men in nursing are preoccupied with balancing the contradictions and tensions in their lives associated with enacting a contextual performance of masculinity depending on the social context of their gender performance.

Originality/value

A comprehensive synthesis of the existing men in nursing literature is presented and these findings are situated within a broader discussion of gender in nursing and society. This analysis provides the impetus for a “call to action” for nursing to comprehensively and meaningfully address the negative consequences of patriarchal forces on the profession of nursing.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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