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1 – 10 of over 19000
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Mekhala Kaluarachchi, K.G.A.S. Waidyasekara and Raufdeen Rameezdeen

Construction activities generate noise that is harmful to workers and the neighbouring community. Engineering control methods are often used for its control which are…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction activities generate noise that is harmful to workers and the neighbouring community. Engineering control methods are often used for its control which are expensive and limited in effectiveness. This study aims to investigate factors that affect employee behaviour and how it could be used by construction companies to manage noise pollution on sites.

Design/methodology/approach

Norm Activation Model (NAM) is used to investigate the relationship between attitudes and behaviour of site-based employees using a questionnaire survey administered in Colombo, Sri Lanka. The responses were analysed using structural equation modelling to discern behavioural patterns and how it differs between managers and workers.

Findings

The results showed that behaviour of site employees could be influenced when they are aware of the consequences of noise pollution and take responsibility for its control. Personal norm of an employee and company's environmental behaviour are found to influence the behaviour in a positive manner.

Practical implications

Construction companies should focus more on how to harness their employee's behaviour in order to reduce noise pollution on sites. Employees should be made aware of consequences of noise pollution and feel responsible for their actions through training, awareness campaigns, signage and so on.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by building a theoretical model of employee noise control behaviour in construction organizations and empirically testing it among managers and workers. It compares the differences between these two groups which enhances one’s understanding of behavioural control methods when applied in a construction project setting. The study also evaluates the effects of company's environmental behaviour on employee behaviour.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Nikki Bell, Jennifer Lunt, Jennifer Webster and Tim Ward

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dimensions that distinguish high from low performing manufacturing companies in Great Britain with respect to controlling

1634

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dimensions that distinguish high from low performing manufacturing companies in Great Britain with respect to controlling noise. The findings should assist regulators and industry to develop interventions that help organisations to effectively manage noise, particularly amongst the low performers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses quantitative and qualitative methods. Survey data was obtained from 215 manufacturers and supplemented with 15 qualitative interviews to assess performance and individual, social, environmental and organisational influences on duty holders' decision making for controlling noise.

Findings

Relative to low performers, decision makers from high performing companies had: greater in-depth knowledge of noise risks and controls; taken steps to promote positive health and safety attitudes and values; were large companies; and faced fewer resource barriers (time, costs, staffing). Managers in small, low performing companies sought simple interventions with a practical focus.

Research limitations/implications

The differences reported between high and low performing companies showed a small magnitude of effect but these are considered significant in a health and safety context.

Practical implications

Improvements in training and education, and addressing workplace health and safety culture, are recommended as offering most potential to raise the standard of noise control.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to systematically assess the specific knowledge, attitudes, values and beliefs that employers hold about noise and the influence of social, environmental and organisational factors on manager’s decisions about noise controls.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Airport Design and Operation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-054643-8

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2018

Nigel Oseland and Paige Hodsman

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether noise is affected by psychological factors rather than simply by physical metrics. For example, personality type, age…

1313

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether noise is affected by psychological factors rather than simply by physical metrics. For example, personality type, age, perceived control and screening ability were explored, as well as the choice of primary workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted which resulted in 517 valid responses. The survey included the personality profiling along with questions related to noise and personal circumstances. The key noise metrics were perceived performance, ability to work, well-being and stress plus three noise indices: concentration, distraction and speech interference.

Findings

The survey revealed that personality type does affect noise perception, in particular extroversion and neuroticism. Perceived control, screening ability, age, workplace, design and focused work are also factors. Personal variables accounted for 25 per cent of the variance in the ability to carry out work, and for 40 per cent of the variance in concentration and speech interference.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst statistically significant differences were found for most of the psychological and personal variables, the size of effect was smaller than anticipated. This is likely because the survey was carried out across a range or workplaces, rather than in a laboratory, with a number of uncontrolled extraneous factors.

Practical implications

The research has resulted in the development of a design guidance document for controlling noise distractions based on more psychoacoustic, people-centred, principles than purely physical ones.

Originality value

Most acoustics research is conducted in the laboratory and focuses on the physical sound properties. This research took a psychoacoustic approach focusing more on psychological and personal factors, and was carried out in the real world.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Strategic Airport Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-58-547441-0

Abstract

Details

Airport Design and Operation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-869-4

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

John Hutchinson

Examines the problem of noise level of civil aircraft engines. Focuses on two aspects of aircraft fan noise: cabin noise and community noise. Outlines the FANPAC programme…

Abstract

Examines the problem of noise level of civil aircraft engines. Focuses on two aspects of aircraft fan noise: cabin noise and community noise. Outlines the FANPAC programme launched in 1992 to assess techniques to control fan noise and describes two of the most promising liner designs. Reports on the progress made and suggests a follow‐on programme to explore further areas.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1984

Adequate protection from external noise and vibration, adequate control of noise emission to keep the neighbours happy, control of office services plant and equipment to…

Abstract

Adequate protection from external noise and vibration, adequate control of noise emission to keep the neighbours happy, control of office services plant and equipment to avoid poor working conditions, optimum layout, finishes and fittings for good acoustics and appropriate sound insulation, special acoustic applications — this article, by Jeffrey Charles of Bickerdike Allen Partners, is concerned with the technical know‐how necessary for good acoustic conditions in and around the office, and the actions the facilities manager can and should take to achieve them.

Details

Facilities, vol. 2 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1955

THE potentialities of television in industry were referred to by this journal (March, 1954) when we reported on the Pye TV unit which had been installed in the National…

Abstract

THE potentialities of television in industry were referred to by this journal (March, 1954) when we reported on the Pye TV unit which had been installed in the National College of Rubber Technology, enabling shop floor demonstrations to be seen in detail by large numbers of students in the lecture theatre some way off.

Details

Work Study, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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