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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Tashmika Ramdav and Nishani Harinarain

The purpose of this study is to analyse the survival of the quantity surveying profession using a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis in an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyse the survival of the quantity surveying profession using a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis in an attempt to define the key strengths and weaknesses of the quantity surveying profession based on professional consultants’ experience and to determine the key opportunities and threats which are perceived to impact the quantity surveying profession significantly.

Design/methodology/approach

The positivist paradigm was used for this study. The researchers chose quantitative research in the form of questionnaires. A probability sampling method was used. The desired method that was used was the random sampling method. The data were analysed with SPSS using factor analysis and descriptive analysis. A sample of 58 quantity surveyors was randomly selected from the Association of South African Quantity Surveyors (ASAQS) for this study.

Findings

Four categories of strengths exist, namely, the ability to plan and solve problems, core quantity surveying measuring skills, project viability and interpersonal skills. Three categories of weaknesses exist, namely, technical inadequacies of quantity surveyors, resistance to change and lack of knowledge of and about the profession. Three categories of opportunities exist, namely, greater demand for quantity surveyors, the need for quantity surveyors and new and existing roles in and out of the profession. Three categories of threats exist, namely, lack of the quantity surveying profession to market itself where new roles require an advancement of core quantity surveying services, external factors that hinder the performance of the profession and the lack of quantity surveying skills in the new generation.

Research limitations/implications

Only members of the ASAQS were included in this research.

Originality/value

The quantity surveying profession requires a strategic framework that will overcome their threats and weaknesses and embrace the strengths and opportunities of the profession to ensure they survive and remain relevant in the ever-changing construction industry. This study aided the quantity surveying profession by identifying the strengths and opportunities and determining the weaknesses and threats faced by the profession.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Nishani Harinarain and Theodore C. Haupt

– This paper aims to present the responses of students to various aspects of a cluster of discrete modules delivered using a studio-based learning pedagogy.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the responses of students to various aspects of a cluster of discrete modules delivered using a studio-based learning pedagogy.

Design/methodology/approach

A variation of a case study approach was used that included observations and a survey of student opinions on six constructs or themes after a period of eight weeks into the semester about their experience of studio-based learning in a three-module cluster. This paper only reports on the findings of the analysis of the self-administered survey of the views of students.

Findings

The student responses were analysed using SPSS (version 22). It is evident that the distinguishing features of the studio-based learning form of instructional delivery were reflected in their views despite the instructional space being far from ideal. However, given that this was their first experience they were apprehensive about the benefits of the approach to them personally especially in terms of whether their acquired knowledge base was broad enough for them to be confident about their future careers. The mapping of the learning outcomes of the modules against the project phases demonstrated that only the mode of transmission had in fact changed. Students were reticent about taking responsibility for their own learning possibly because they perceived that as being too risky.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited because the findings are based on a single case and a sample of students who had experienced eight weeks of studio-based learning of a cluster of three discrete modules in a revitalised construction program.

Originality/value

The findings of this study have implications for the way construction programs are delivered at institutions of higher education.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Alec Sacks, Adam Nisbet, Jarrod Ross and Nishani Harinarain

The sustainable green movement is significantly gaining momentum around the globe and South Africa needs to follow suit. However, such a movement needs to be significantly…

Abstract

Purpose

The sustainable green movement is significantly gaining momentum around the globe and South Africa needs to follow suit. However, such a movement needs to be significantly tested. It is therefore essential to present both foundation and supplementary research in the primary concepts within this topic in order to lay the groundwork for future analysis. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the cost‐effectiveness of the heat recovery ventilation (HRV) technology incorporated within Lincoln on the Lake, against a direct‐expansion (DX) ducted system of conventional practice utilising the life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to determine if the sustainable option is the better choice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a case study, based on a green building in KwaZulu‐Natal, South Africa using a ten step life cycle cost analysis.

Findings

In terms of the LCCA performed at Lincoln on the Lake, this case study has found that sustainable measures were far more cost effective over the 20 year study period than that of the comparable conventional system. The life‐cycle cost analysis tool has provided a simple, uniform and predetermined manner for which the life‐cycle costs of sustainable designs can be successfully quantified.

Originality/value

The value which sustainable building practices can pose, has not been fully realised among clients and professionals within the South African construction industry due to lack of proof that value incentives do exist. This paper, therefore, emphasizes that savings can be made over the long term by going the sustainable route.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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