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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Barlu Dumbuya and Niru Nirupama

This paper aims to analyse the case of Sierra Leone from the lens of economic impact and underlying causes for concern towards economic sustainability in a post-Ebola…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the case of Sierra Leone from the lens of economic impact and underlying causes for concern towards economic sustainability in a post-Ebola recovery phase.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis of literature from various sources, including public and private sectors, non-governmental organisations, multilateral agencies, peer reviewed scholarly articles and media reports was carried out. A total of 77 articles were reviewed. Each document from each source types was then examined for recurring themes that would enhance understanding on the topic addressed here. The NVivo qualitative analysis software was used for coding and extracting of themes from these articles using certain keywords and phrases that relate to the study objectives.

Findings

The Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone caused impairment of exports and the capacity to raise revenue via taxes due to significant slump in economic activities. The post-conflict strategy to increase foreign investment had kick-started a gradual recovery, but the Ebola crisis threatened further gains. The crisis also highlighted that the country’s economy depended on foreign investment in a single key sector of iron ore for which global prices fell during Ebola significantly. Although socio-economic impacts of Ebola will linger for some time and health system would have to be vitalised, a sense of optimism was found in many documents.

Originality/value

The research approach is new and comprehensive in that it looks at post-conflict Sierra Leone in combination with ongoing biophysical and hydrometeorological hazards, and how the Ebola outbreak became completely devastating for the country’s economic sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Niru Nirupama

Disaster risk and vulnerability assessment depends on various factors such as appropriate theoretical concepts and quality and adequacy of information gathered. Accounting…

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Abstract

Purpose

Disaster risk and vulnerability assessment depends on various factors such as appropriate theoretical concepts and quality and adequacy of information gathered. Accounting for people's perception and partnering with them in the process leads to deeper understanding of community vulnerability, which in turn provides better assessment of disaster risk. The purpose of this paper is to offer an integrated approach for risk and vulnerability assessment that includes theoretical concept, quantitative risk assessment method, and a component representing people's perception.

Design/methodology/approach

The Pressure and Release (PAR) model framework is used for basic understanding of the progression of vulnerability through identification of root causes such as: limited access to power and resources; dynamic pressures – lack of education, urbanization and demographics; and unsafe conditions such as dangerous locations. To complement PAR, the Access to Resources (ATR) model is used that expands upon the dynamics of changing decisions, options, livelihood opportunities, available resources, and choices made by the population that is impacted by disaster(s) – in time and space. Conventional risk equation: R=H x V provides community risk profile.

Findings

Using a working example, it is demonstrated that risk assessment can have significant influence by introducing an additional component to represent “community perception” in the fundamental risk equation.

Originality/value

The proposed approach: Risk (R) = Hazard (H) x Vulnerability (V) x Community Perception (cp), provides a unique and comprehensive approach to evaluate disaster risk by taking people's perception into account.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Niru Nirupama

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307

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Niru Nirupama and David Etkin

The present study seeks to explore the minds and thoughts of emergency management professionals in Ontario in order to better understand the institution, and engage them…

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895

Abstract

Purpose

The present study seeks to explore the minds and thoughts of emergency management professionals in Ontario in order to better understand the institution, and engage them in a renewed dialogue with communities, academia and other stakeholders. The intention is to strengthen the institution of emergency management, which is the foundation of disaster mitigation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on interviews conducted with emergency management professionals from the public, private and non‐governmental organization (NGO) sectors in the Province of Ontario, Canada. The questions were a combination of structured and open‐ended questions to elicit rich details on emergency management professionals’ views. Analysis of interview transcriptions highlighted the attitudes and perceptions of the interviewees with respect to themselves, their own organizations, their role in emergency management, and their jurisdictions. The study also provided an opportunity for respondents to provide examples or comments to illustrate their responses. A total of 43 interviews have been analyzed for this paper.

Findings

The research objective of enhancing the understanding of the institution of emergency management through the minds of emergency management professionals in Ontario has been successfully achieved. It is clear that emergency managers and other professionals engaged in consulting, response and humanitarian assistance activities realize their role and responsibilities quite well. The majority of participants felt that politics and a lack of understanding of one anothers’ roles often limit progress. A clear consensus regarding engaging community players in the development of mitigation strategies and resource allocation emerged in this study.

Originality/value

The research conducted is the first of its kind in the province of Ontario in Canada. With the help of personal interviews and survey questionnaire, a better understanding of the emergency management institution and professionals working in this field could be realized.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Suchandra Basu and Nirupama Devaraj

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of activism in determining the identity of the “green” median voter and the influence of the green voter on environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of activism in determining the identity of the “green” median voter and the influence of the green voter on environmental regulatory stringency in the US states.

Design/methodology/approach

Regulatory stringency is measured using output weighted abatement spending and an industry concentration adjusted index of state environmental compliance costs for the period 1989-1994. Activism measures include environmental initiatives, median support for pollution standards and voter ideology. Fixed-effects panel methodology is used in empirical estimation.

Findings

The authors find that activism increases stringency in regulating overall as well as media-specific pollution. The results particularly highlight the nuances of different approaches to activism and their varied impact across pollution media.

Research limitations/implications

A drawback of the empirical estimation is the lack of continuous historical abatement spending data. A longer panel with alternative stringency measure(s) would add explanatory power to activism, especially since some activism measures capture slow-changing institutional factors.

Social implications

The study identifies the conditions under which activism can have the most impact on a society's environmental outcomes since pollution varies in damages, hence abatement costs, across pollution media.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the existing literature by incorporating three alternative measures of environmental activism to systematically investigate its impact on environmental stringency within a fixed-effects regression design. It also promotes a deeper understanding of the efficacy of the activism process by deconstructing policy stringency across pollution media to show that activism and its impacts are more nuanced than previously studied.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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