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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2017

Nina Evans and Rae Baines

The purpose of this paper is to explore a large data set compiled by a UK charity loan scheme to identify trends and paint a practice-based picture of how young children…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a large data set compiled by a UK charity loan scheme to identify trends and paint a practice-based picture of how young children use early years powered mobility (EYPM).

Design/methodology/approach

Statistical analysis was used to investigate a database of 90 children, ranging in age from 15 to 72 months who completed use of an EYPM device (the Wizzybug, or WB) between April 2011 and December 2015. Goals were set and reviewed, and thematic analysis was used to understand families’ insights into their children’s use of EYPM, using a free-text review form.

Findings

Children’s mean age when joining this free loan scheme was 39.6 months. The later the child started using a Wizzybug, the less likely they were to achieve their goals. A theme of happiness and enjoyment emerged as important for both child and family. The child’s independence translated to independence for the whole family.

Research limitations/implications

The database was operational and incomplete. Lack of a standardised outcome measure was disadvantageous.

Practical implications

Challenges of translating research knowledge into practice are highlighted, supporting the need for more rigorous and standardised outcome measures. Earlier identification of children’s readiness for EYPM is required alongside research and recognition of the holistic benefits of EYPM for all the family.

Originality/value

This research profited from a large data set of young children with long-term access to powered mobility at home.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Athar Mahmood Ahmed Qureshi and Nina Evans

This study aims to explore deterrents to knowledge-sharing in pharmaceutical manufacturing. Effective knowledge-sharing is fundamental to stimulation of the process of…

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2073

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore deterrents to knowledge-sharing in pharmaceutical manufacturing. Effective knowledge-sharing is fundamental to stimulation of the process of knowledge absorption. The limited proximal communication between the employees in the pharmaceutical industry stifles their knowledge-sharing behaviour significantly.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional case study, consisting of semi-structured interviews with managers and scientists, was conducted in a multinational pharmaceutical company in Australia. Respondents were asked to answer questions regarding their current knowledge-sharing practices and to identify organisational deterrents to knowledge-sharing. The data were condensed into themes according to the thematic analysis method.

Findings

The pharmaceutical industry is extensively regulated and its excessive competitiveness is cultivating organisational reticence towards the development of a knowledge-sharing culture. Nine categories of deterrents to intra- (within) and inter-organisational (between organisations) knowledge-sharing have been identified. These categories include high cost of sharing knowledge, information technology limitations, knowledge-hiding, lack of socialisation, lack of trust culture, non-educational mindset, organisational politics, poor leadership and time pressure.

Research limitations/implications

The population of this study consists of managers and practitioners working for a pharmaceutical company. Hence, the generalisability of the findings to other health-care settings is unknown.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for leaders and managers who should be aware of these professional diversities, instigators as well as the ripple effects of limited knowledge-sharing to guide the organisation towards developing an optimal knowledge-sharing culture.

Originality/value

A focussed investigation of knowledge-sharing behaviour within the pharmaceutical industry in Australia, considering the pressure applied to this industry over the past decade. This case study specifically focusses on the diversity of deterrents to knowledge-sharing in the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Roger Orpwood, Tim Adlam, Nina Evans, James Chadd and David Self

This paper presents the results of a study evaluating a complete autonomous smart home installation in an apartment in a care home, and the impact it had on the behaviour…

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a study evaluating a complete autonomous smart home installation in an apartment in a care home, and the impact it had on the behaviour and independence of someone with quite severe dementia (Mini Mental State Examination, or MMSE, of 10). It describes the technology that has been evolved for this purpose, and how the apartment was configured. The evaluation compared the behaviour of the resident before and after the switching on of a wide range of autonomous support technology, by analysing the logged sensor data, through a questionnaire‐based outcome measure, and through transcribed interviews. The technology enabled the client to retain a lot of independence. It helped him to regain urinary continence, improved his sleep from around 3.5 hours per night to 5.5, and halved the number of night‐time wanderings. The paper concludes with a series of recommendations for future work in this area.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Nina Evans and Crystal Hoole

It is generally accepted that new information technologies are an integral part of most forms of business initiatives. Evidence suggests that many of these innovations are…

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1742

Abstract

Purpose

It is generally accepted that new information technologies are an integral part of most forms of business initiatives. Evidence suggests that many of these innovations are ineffective and under‐utilised. The information systems/information technology (IS/IT) industry often does not seem to be capable of delivering what business clients expect. Owing to this “expectation gap” and various behavioural issues, business experts have a negative perception of the IS/IT function. It is proposed that a new way of alignment between IT and business is necessary The research aims to address two problems, namely, what factors are influencing business‐IT interface within organisations, and how the IT executive could contribute towards fusion fulfilling an organisational development (OD) role.

Design/methodology/approach

A triangular and qualitative research approach was followed, including a literature study, questionnaire and interview.

Findings

Results indicated a number of reasons leading to IT/business failure and also indicate how fusion can be created by fulfilling an OD role.

Research limitations/implications

Only companies in the Gauteng region, which is considered to be the economic heart of South Africa, have been included in the study. The small sample size might hinder the generalisation of the results and could be further extended.

Originality/value

The research indicates how a healthy business‐IT interface can be achieved through the fusion of the IT function and the rest of the business by integrating OD initiatives.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Nina Evans and Janet Sawyer

This paper aims to report on the key CSR strategies, activities and attitudes of small business owners in a South Australian regional area with regard to the key…

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3124

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the key CSR strategies, activities and attitudes of small business owners in a South Australian regional area with regard to the key stakeholders, towards developing socially and environmentally responsible small businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation was conducted collaboratively between the University of South Australia's Centre for Regional Engagement (CRE) and the Whyalla Economic Development Board (WEDB), using an interview‐driven, qualitative design.

Findings

It was found that the small business owners in Whyalla were supportive of their stakeholders, especially the local community, because it was the right thing to do and was generally beneficial to their business.

Research limitations/implications

It is acknowledged that this type of research design limits the degree to which the results can be generalised, as the sample was limited and questions on environmental issues can be misunderstood and misinterpreted.

Practical implications

The results enable the University to assist the University and the WEDB to play an active role in developing the social and environmental awareness of businesses towards sustainable, socially and environmentally responsible regional small businesses.

Social implications

CSR is viewed through the lens of stakeholder theory, where stakeholders are all the people and entities that contribute to the businesses’ wealth‐creating activities.

Originality/value

The paper is based on an original study within small firms and their social and environmental responsibility relating to their stakeholders. Previous research on the CSR activities of small businesses within regional or rural environments is limited, especially in regional areas of a developed economy.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Mohd Heikal Husin, Nina Evans and Gaye Deegan

Ensuring effective usage of Web 2.0 within government organisations is not as straightforward as it seems. The organisations should be aware of a number of issues when…

Abstract

Purpose

Ensuring effective usage of Web 2.0 within government organisations is not as straightforward as it seems. The organisations should be aware of a number of issues when implementing Web 2.0 internally. This paper introduces a theoretical model that highlights the importance of management, technology and people issues influencing the level of Web 2.0 usage from an internal perspective. The purpose of this paper was to identify and explore these issues in a government context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a mixed-method (qualitative and quantitative) analysis to identify the issues that should be focused on for achieving effective usage of Web 2.0 among government employees. A combination of interviews, surveys and usage data collected from two government organisations was used to gather the data.

Findings

The main finding is that, a policy will act as an initial catalyst for culture change and effective usage of Web 2.0 technologies in a government environment. It was also found that it is important to develop an understanding among senior management about the motivation for their employees to utilise Web 2.0 internally. As a result, the proposed theoretical model could assist government organisations in developing effective adoption approaches through identifying their employees’ motivation to adopt Web 2.0 technologies and developing a suitable organisational social media policy.

Research limitations/implications

There is the issue of the small number of both qualitative and quantitative respondents within the research. Such limitation is because the research relies solely on the voluntary participation of the employees. This limitation was coupled with the fact that both organisations had different security requirements that had affected the amount and level of feasible information that was accessible to the researchers.

Practical implications

This paper extends the understanding of issues applicable to the adoption of Web 2.0 tools from a government organisations’ perspective. The developed theoretical model acts as an adoption guide for organisations to achieve effective Web2.0 tools usage. At the same time, this paper also examines related motivation aspects which higher management should consider while using a new social media or Web 2.0 platform internally.

Originality/value

This paper highlights suitable overview approaches for organisations to consider in increasing adoption of Web 2.0 among their employees. This paper also provides an initial foray into identifying other complex issues that may exist within different government organisations in relation to internal technology usage.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2020

Nina S. Pflugfelder

The purpose of this study is to investigate how Knowledge Management (KM) and Intellectual Capital (IC) can increase the organizational performance of ambulatory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how Knowledge Management (KM) and Intellectual Capital (IC) can increase the organizational performance of ambulatory healthcare providers and how such performance can be assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the PRISMA guidelines, a structured review of peer-reviewed English-speaking articles up to 31st December 2019 was conducted. A search of ACM Digital Library, Cochrane Library, DARE, EBSCOHost, Medline, ProQuest, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus and Web of Science produced 8,391 results. All studies that did not examine the impact of KM initiatives on organizational performance in an ambulatory healthcare provider setting were eliminated. The final sample of 31 studies was examined regarding the design of the KM initiatives as well as the performance concepts and indicators employed.

Findings

A range of KM tools and methods (Electronic Health Records, Clinical Decision Support, Health Information Technology, Training, Communities of Practice) have been shown to improve healthcare processes but evidence of an impact on outcomes remains mixed. Performance indicators focus on medical quality but rarely capture economic or social performance. Indicators have been adapted from the medical field, but do not adequately capture IC and KM-induced performance.

Originality/value

This review provides an overview of KM initiatives in ambulatory healthcare and assesses the associated performance metrics through an IC lens. Thereby, it enables further research on the interplay of IC, KM and performance in ambulatory care and points to several research gaps. It provides managers with guidance for designing KM initiatives in their organizations

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Camelia Catharina Pasandaran and Nina Mutmainnah

The purpose of this paper is to test hypotheses on the effects of native advertising on young media consumers. First, it aims to discover whether the young audience…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test hypotheses on the effects of native advertising on young media consumers. First, it aims to discover whether the young audience activates news-based schema or advertising schema when exposed to different themes of native advertising. Second, this research tests whether there is a relationship between the theme of native advertising and the credibility of the media in which it is placed and the ability of young media consumers to recognize the advertising. Third, it attempts to seek a possible relationship between the recognition of native advertising and the credibility of the advertiser.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study was carried out using 186 university students in the greater Jakarta area whose ages ranged between 18 and 22 years. Participants were randomly assigned to six groups (2 × 3 experimental design) and asked to respond to a set of questions related to their awareness of native advertising. They were also asked their opinions on the advertiser’s credibility before and after they were told that the content was native advertising.

Findings

Results show that most of these young media consumers could not spot native advertising and have difficulties in recognizing political native advertising. The findings also point out a more profound decline in advertiser credibility among groups exposed to political native advertising compared to nonpolitical native advertising.

Research limitations/implications

Results show that most of these young media consumers could not spot native advertising and have difficulties in recognizing political native advertising. The findings also point out a more profound decline in advertiser credibility among groups exposed to political native advertising compared to non-political native advertising.

Originality/value

This research shows that the theme of the native advertising has a significant influence on the ability of media consumers to recognize native advertising. The results indicate that non-commercial native advertising is highly deceptive. This finding is valuable for the improvement of advertising regulation, especially on non-commercial native advertising.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Aki Jääskeläinen, Virpi Sillanpää, Nina Helander, Riikka-Leena Leskelä, Ira Haavisto, Valtteri Laasonen and Paulus Torkki

This study aims to report the design and testing of a maturity model for information and knowledge management in the public sector, intended for use in frequent…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to report the design and testing of a maturity model for information and knowledge management in the public sector, intended for use in frequent monitoring, trend analysis and in-depth analysis of the contemporary information and knowledge management practices of an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A design science approach was used to develop the proposed model. Creation of the model was based on an extensive literature review. Testing of the model was implemented as a survey receiving 37 responses from nine organizations organizing and purchasing public services.

Findings

The study presents four alternative profiles for an organization’s status, novice, experimenter, facilitator and advanced exploiter, and investigates the differences between these profiles on the basis of the empirical data gathered. The model was found to be both a valid and practical way to determine the state of an organization’s information and knowledge management and identify development needs.

Research limitations/implications

Testing was conducted in the Finnish public sector and further studies applying the model could be implemented in other countries. The model presented was designed specifically for the public sector and more research is needed to test its applicability in the private sector.

Originality/value

Maturity models are useful when evaluating information and knowledge management status in an organization, and beneficial for improving organizational performance. The proposed maturity model combines the fields of knowledge management and information management and contributes to the literature with an overarching maturity model that includes a dimension of satisfaction with the organizational maturity level. While many earlier models originate from the consultancy business, the model presented here was also designed for research purposes and tested in practice.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Nina Magomedova, Fariza Achcaoucaou and Paloma Miravitlles

The aim of this study is to explore how springboard subsidiaries affect the psychic distance between the headquarters (HQ) of multinational companies (MNCs) and a distant…

Abstract

The aim of this study is to explore how springboard subsidiaries affect the psychic distance between the headquarters (HQ) of multinational companies (MNCs) and a distant target region. The study applies a single case study methodology to analyse a springboard subsidiary located in Spain that helps its German HQ to pursue opportunities in a psychically distant Latin American region. The findings suggest that springboard subsidiaries help MNCs to reduce the perceived psychic distance between their HQ and a target region due to (1) their intermediate psychic proximity in both directions (i.e. to the HQ and the target region) and (2) their location outside the target region, which makes them somewhat ‘impartial’ and not involved in intra-regional conflicts; the study also shows that the sum of psychic distance stimuli between HQ’s home country –springboard subsidiary’s country and springboard subsidiary’s – Latin American countries is actually smaller than the direct psychic distance between HQ’s home country and Latin American countries. No previous studies have explored the effect of springboard subsidiaries on psychic distance.

Details

Distance in International Business: Concept, Cost and Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-718-0

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