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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2021

Nimitha Aboobaker and Muneer K.H.

In the context of the abrupt shift to technology-enabled distance education, this paper examines the role of intrinsic learning motivation, computer self-efficacy and…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of the abrupt shift to technology-enabled distance education, this paper examines the role of intrinsic learning motivation, computer self-efficacy and learning engagement in facilitating higher learning effectiveness in a web-based learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected using a self-administered online questionnaire from a sample of randomly selected 508 university students from different disciplines, including science, technology, and management.

Findings

Learning motivation and computer self-efficacy positively influenced students' learning engagement, with computer self-efficacy having a more substantial impact. Proposed mediation hypotheses too were supported.

Originality/value

The insights gained from this study will help in devising strategies for improving students' learning effectiveness. Game-based learning pedagogy and computer simulations can help students understand the higher meaning and purpose of the learning process.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Nimitha Aboobaker, Manoj Edward and K.A. Zakkariya

Teaching is generally seen as a calling, rather than just a formal profession. In the context of commercialization of higher education, with increased workloads and lack…

Abstract

Purpose

Teaching is generally seen as a calling, rather than just a formal profession. In the context of commercialization of higher education, with increased workloads and lack of community relationships, the purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of employees’ experience of workplace spirituality on intention to stay with the organization, mediated through work–family conflict. The study seeks to add to theory development in the area of workplace spirituality and its outcomes, by examining the theoretical framework through the lens of self-determination theory of motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study was conducted among a sample of 350 teachers, working in the private sector higher educational institutes in India, selected through purposive sampling. Validated and widely accepted tests were administered among the respondents and structural equation modeling was done to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The findings of the study suggest that amongst the current generation of teachers, experience of workplace spirituality and work–family conflict (WFC) plays a significant role in predicting intention to stay with the organization. Employees’ experience of dimensions of workplace spirituality had varying influences on WFC and intention to stay with the organization. WFC mediated the relationships between two dimensions of workplace spirituality (meaningful work and sense of community) and intention to stay, but not the relationship between alignment with organizational values and intention to stay.

Originality/value

This study is pioneering in conceptualizing and testing a theoretical model linking workplace spirituality, work–family conflict and intention to stay, particularly through the self-determination motivational theory perspective. To improve employees’ intention to stay with the organizations, managers need to devise strategies aimed at facilitating connectedness and lowered WFC. Personalized work–family policies might be the need of the hour, as to contain the inherent WFC in contemporary organizations.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Nimitha Aboobaker and Renjini D.

In the context of conflicting results in the existing literature on the effectiveness of entrepreneurial education and training, this study aims to examine the effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of conflicting results in the existing literature on the effectiveness of entrepreneurial education and training, this study aims to examine the effect of entrepreneurial training on perceived human capital and entrepreneurial intention of students. A deeper understanding of the effectiveness of entrepreneurship programs assumes significance, given the substantial policy support and budgetary spending on entrepreneurship education across the world, especially in emerging economies like India. Furthermore, the authors seek to examine if human capital mediates the relationship between entrepreneurial training and entrepreneurial intention.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 330 final-year students who had undergone a mandatory course on “entrepreneurship and new venture planning” in various disciplines in science, technology and management were randomly selected as sample respondents. A self-administered and structured questionnaire that measured the attitude toward perceived effectiveness of entrepreneurial education and training, perceived human capital and the entrepreneurial intention was used to elicit responses.

Findings

Results revealed that entrepreneurial training and education are effective in eliciting an important student-level outcome of entrepreneurial intention. Furthermore, the study found that human capital significantly mediates the aforementioned relationship. Based on these findings, it is suggested to further the focus of entrepreneurial training programs conducted in universities and thus foster entrepreneurial outcomes among students.

Originality/value

This study adds to the body of knowledge, by examining if entrepreneurial education and training provided by universities indeed yield positive results in terms of higher intentions to engage in entrepreneurial activities, with emphasis on a large developing economy like India. Entrepreneurship development is widely recognized as an effective tool for the socio-economic development of societies in developing countries. This study, by establishing the efficacy of entrepreneurship education in creating entrepreneurial intention among young students, endorses the policy focus and resource spending on entrepreneurship training and education. Also, this study is pioneering in examining the mediating role of human capital in the aforementioned relationship.

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2020

Nimitha Aboobaker, Manoj Edward and Zakkariya K.A.

The purpose of this paper examines the relationship between dimensions of workplace spirituality (meaningful work, sense of community and alignment with organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper examines the relationship between dimensions of workplace spirituality (meaningful work, sense of community and alignment with organizational values) and employee loyalty (intention to stay, benefit insensitivity toward alternate employers and word of mouth about the organization), in the context of millennials who are three times more likely to change jobs, than other generations.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study was conducted among a sample of 308 employees, working in private sector organizations in India. Self-reporting questionnaires were administered among the respondents, who were selected through a purposive sampling method and structural equation modeling was done to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The three dimensions of workplace spirituality had varying influences on the outcomes variables. Alignment with organizational values was positively related to all dimensions of employee loyalty, whereas the sense of community had a positive association with intention to stay and benefit insensitivity while meaningful work indicated positive influence only on benefit insensitivity. The findings, in general, suggest that employees’ experience of workplace spirituality has significant positive influence on their loyalty toward the organization.

Originality/value

This study is pioneering in conceptualizing and testing a theoretical model linking workplace spirituality and employee loyalty, particularly in the context of millennials, who form 50 per cent of the workforce and reportedly exhibit higher turnover intentions. The study gains relevance in the context of reports about monetary/non-monetary preferences among millennial employees and that the generation is not too keen in working with teams, but would rather prefer working in an organization, which provides space for self-actualization in individual growth. Implications for their experience of workplace spirituality and outcomes are elaborated, thus striving to fill a gap in the existing literature.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2020

Nimitha Aboobaker and Zakkariya K.A.

The paper aims to examine the influence of students’ digital learning orientation on their readiness for change and innovative work behaviour. Elaborations are made on how…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the influence of students’ digital learning orientation on their readiness for change and innovative work behaviour. Elaborations are made on how these concepts can be utilized for strengthening the teaching-learning process in higher education institutions, and help them gain more cutting-edge competencies in areas of learning delivery and learning engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The respondents for this descriptive study were drawn through random sampling, from an end-semester student group, who had taken up post-graduate courses in science and technology streams of a prominent science and technology university. Data was collected by administering self-reporting questionnaires.

Findings

The study revealed that higher digital learning orientation is associated with improved attitude towards change and higher innovative behaviour. With conflicting results in exiting literature, regarding the influence of digital learning orientation on learning outcomes, this study adds to the body of knowledge by testing previously unexplored propositions in a student sample.

Originality/value

This study is pioneering in conceptualizing and testing the proposed model. The paper emphasizes the role of digital learning orientation, especially in the context of today’s students being referred to as ‘digital natives’. It is thus imperative to understand how the same can be translated into learning outcomes. The results of the study highlights the need for augmenting the role of digital orientation in the teaching-learning process, so as to transform educational institutions sustainable in producing graduates with readiness for change and innovative work behaviour, in the context of an emergent digital economy.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Nimitha Aboobaker, Manoj Edward and K.A. Zakkariya

This study aims to examine the influence of workplace spirituality on employee loyalty toward the organization, mediated through well-being at work. Furthermore, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the influence of workplace spirituality on employee loyalty toward the organization, mediated through well-being at work. Furthermore, the study endeavors to test the difference in conceptual model estimates, across two groups of employees: those who work on contract/temporary and permanent basis. The study gains relevance particularly in the context of the emerging sharing economy, where jobs are primarily characterized by short-term contracts and freelancing.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study was conducted among a sample of 523 educators working in private educational institutions in India. Self-reporting questionnaires were administered among the respondents, who were selected through the purposive sampling method. Structural equation modeling and multi-group analysis were done to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The analysis revealed that workplace spirituality enriched employee well-being and loyalty toward the organization and evidence were found for indirect effects too. Variances were observed in the relationships, with respect to the different employment statuses of the personnel. Significant differences in the relationships were not found across temporary and permanent employment statuses. Interestingly, temporary employees experienced stronger influences between meaningful work, well-being and word-of-mouth. Results suggest the relevance of understanding employees' differential work experiences and attitudes and thus facilitate human resource strategies accordingly.

Originality/value

This study is pioneering in conceptualizing and testing a theoretical model linking workplace spirituality, well-being at work and employee loyalty, particularly in the context of employees who differ in their employment status, which is a critical aspect of modern-day organizations. Unlike traditional workplaces, in recent times, people come together and work along for shorter terms, as the case of a sharing economy and the thus emergent interpersonal dynamics between each other and with the workplace has significant repercussions on the organization. Theoretical and managerial implications with regard to the experience of workplace spirituality and job outcomes are elaborated, thus striving to fill a gap in the existing literature.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Nimitha Aboobaker and Zakkariya KA

In the emergent context of the digital transformation of learning processes, this study aims to examine the influence of students' digital learning orientation on their…

Abstract

Purpose

In the emergent context of the digital transformation of learning processes, this study aims to examine the influence of students' digital learning orientation on their innovative behavior, mediated through readiness for change. Furthermore, we investigate how organizational learning culture moderates the aforementioned mediated relationship. From an educational sector stakeholders' perspective, elaborations are made on how the constructs will aid in facilitating and nurturing the sustainable development of educational organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The respondents for this descriptive study were drawn from a student sample, who had taken up postgraduate courses in science and technology streams, in a prominent university in India. Self-reporting questionnaires were administered among the respondents, who were selected through random sampling. Measurement model analysis was done using IBM AMOS 21.0, and path analytic procedures using PROCESS 3.0 macro were used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results revealed that digital learning orientation had a significant indirect effect on innovative work behavior, through readiness for change. Also, the conditional indirect effects of digital learning orientation on innovative work behavior, mediated through readiness for change, were influenced by organizational learning culture as the moderator, specifically when the levels of the moderator were low. At optimal levels of an organizational learning culture, digital learning orientation had a significant influence on innovative behavior, through higher readiness for change. However, beyond a certain threshold, organizational learning culture does not have a significant influence on predicting outcomes.

Originality/value

This study is pioneering in conceptualizing and testing a theoretical model linking digital learning orientation, organizational learning culture, readiness for change and innovative behavior. The study is relevant especially in the context of today's students being referred to as “digital natives,” and it, thus, becomes imperative to understand how the same can be translated into work outcomes. Educators are suggested to facilitate an organizational learning culture that is conducive to nurturing positive outcomes among digital native students. Efforts should be oriented toward undertaking teaching pedagogies that will include more of digital gadgets and technologies, enabling higher experiential learning.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

George Joseph, Nimitha Aboobaker and Zakkariya K.A.

This study aims to explore the behavioral patterns of entrepreneurs, their cognitive styles and personality characteristics that can lead to a self-destructive chain of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the behavioral patterns of entrepreneurs, their cognitive styles and personality characteristics that can lead to a self-destructive chain of events during the transition from a fledgling business to one capable of long-term, profitable growth. This study adopts the self-regulation attitude theory to uncover the reasons for premature start-up scaling, which will help founders to study on their cognitive biases, emotions and behaviors and make efforts to do what does not come naturally to them.

Design/methodology/approach

The respondents for this qualitative study were selected from a group of entrepreneurs with extensive experience with technology start-ups that have either failed or succeeded during their development stages. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants, who were selected through snowball sampling, on the theme of understanding “How do premature scaling mistakes happen?”. Thematic analysis was used to unearth common themes.

Findings

The results of this study identified the following themes, “comparison,” “emotional over-reaction,” “impatience,” “mistaken customer priorities,” “overestimation” and “overconfidence,” which eventually leads to premature scaling. The underlying decision-making heuristics of entrepreneurs can be identified as engulfed in different cognitive biases and emotions resulting in negative behavioral patterns, as in the case of premature scaling. Of the six themes, “comparison,” “mistaken customer priorities,” “overestimation” and “overconfidence relates to cognitive bias” and “emotional over-reaction” and “impatience” relate to emotional factors.

Research limitations/implications

The study was made possible with the support of the voluntary participants chosen by purposive and snowballing data sampling. The interviewee and interviewer biases could have also crept in as part of this qualitative approach. The study pertains only to start-ups in the information technology sector and further studies need to be done to generalize the results across industries as well.

Practical implications

This early-stage underestimation of unexpected obstacles in the entrepreneurship journey necessitates a focus on the entrepreneur too, as much as the concept. In these hectic and fast-paced circumstances, aspiring entrepreneurs must be taught how to deal objectively with themselves and others, as well as think strategically. Leaders who scale do so because they take purposeful measures to overcome their weaknesses through self-discipline, soliciting advice from others and using their right to change their attitude and points of view.

Originality/value

The study frames the new approach into the entrepreneurial literature, linking it to self-regulation attitude theory and adds to the nascent literature on neuroentrepreneurship which discuss entrepreneurial cognition, decision-making, and entrepreneurial behavior. This study attempted to explore the reasons behind the premature scaling of startups on an individual level. This study is pioneering in exploring the cognitive factors underlying an entrepreneur’s decision that results in premature scaling. This study provides insights for academicians, entrepreneurs and policymakers and helps understand the cognitive journey that leads to premature scaling.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Maria Tresita Paul V, Nimitha Aboobaker and Uma Devi N

Drawing from the work-home resources model and the conservation of resources theory, this study examines the potential of family incivility in instigating burnout and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the work-home resources model and the conservation of resources theory, this study examines the potential of family incivility in instigating burnout and reduced job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed structured questionnaires to collect data from a sample of 290 doctors working in tertiary care hospitals across India. Measurement modeling was done using IBM AMOS 23.0 and PROCESS macro was employed for hypothesis testing.

Findings

The study revealed that family incivility has a positive spillover effect on burnout, subsequently leading to lowered levels of job satisfaction. Furthermore, burnout mediated the aforementioned relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional, and a longitudinal study will help test more rigorously; the causal relationships between the focal variables are recommended. Self-report data pose limitations concerning common method bias. Data collected from different occupations and cultures would help with further generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

This study establishes that incivility within the family can negatively affect various vital work outcomes. Accordingly, it is recommended for organizations to support employees to achieve improved work-family integration. Further research should explore various coping strategies that will help with mitigating these spillover effects.

Social implications

This study offers a new perspective on the negative effect of family interactions on work-domain outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper extends the scholarly literature on stress and work-family interface by demonstrating that family incivility has spillover effects. This is the pioneering study that examines family incivility as a home demand causing long-term severe damages at work.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Nimmy A. George, Nimitha Aboobaker and Manoj Edward

Drawing from the social identity theory and social exchange theory, the purpose of this study is to examine the intervening mechanisms linking perceived corporate social…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the social identity theory and social exchange theory, the purpose of this study is to examine the intervening mechanisms linking perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) and employees’ affective organizational commitment. It is proposed that organizational trust (OT) and organizational identification (OID) would serially mediate the aforementioned relationship. Furthermore, this paper attempts to understand how employees’ attitude toward the importance of CSR (ICSR), moderates the linkages under the focus of this study.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study was conducted among a sample of 519 employees working in the manufacturing sector in India. Self-reporting standardized questionnaires were administered among the respondents, who were selected through the judgment sampling method. Measurement model analysis was done using IBM AMOS 24.0 and Hayes’ PROCESS macro 3.0 (Models 6 and 84) was used for testing the serial mediation and moderated serial mediation.

Findings

Results revealed a significant indirect effect of all dimensions of CSR on employees’ affective commitment, serially mediated through OT and OID. The conditional indirect effects varied significantly and it was identified that CSR to customers and CSR to employees had a significant conditional indirect effect on affective commitment, through attitude toward the ICSR, OID and OT. However, the conditional indirect effect of CSR to social and non-social stakeholders on affective commitment was not statistically significant.

Originality/value

This study is pioneering in conceptualizing and empirically testing an integrated theoretical framework that models the influences of perceived CSR, employees’ attitude toward the ICSR, OID and OT on their affective commitment toward the organization. CSR plays a vital role in strengthening the employer-employee relationship and managers should facilitate a work environment that befits the alignment of organizational and individual ethics and values.

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