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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Niki Macionis and Noe¨lle O'Connor

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the question: “How can the film‐induced tourism phenomenon be sustainably managed?” and review the implications arising.

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1500

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the question: “How can the film‐induced tourism phenomenon be sustainably managed?” and review the implications arising.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on each of the articles in the theme issue to examine the individual and collective insights.

Findings

It can be argued that an action plan for maximizing the film‐induced tourism benefits at the related destinations can be realized by building on the recommendations contained in this theme issue.

Practical implications

The paper explores the scope and potential for developing the film‐induced tourism sector.

Originality/value

This paper identifies successful case examples and action lines for future development, including continued dialogue between academics and practitioners involved in the film and tourism industries.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Noëlle O’Connor and Niki Macionis

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468

Abstract

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Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

C. Michael Hall, Brock Cambourne, Niki Macionis and Gary Johnson

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly…

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1727

Abstract

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly through the development of inter and intra industry networks. This paper provides a review of wine tourism, briefly discusses networks and their value, then analyses the development of wine tourism networks in Australia and New Zealand. The research indicates that although wine tourism network development is being actively encouraged, substantial difficulties exist because of the perception by many in the wine industry that they are not part of tourism. The paper concludes that while the development of new organisational structures to encourage wine tourism development are useful, they must be complimented by research on linkages, education of potential network members in order to close information gaps; and the development of network structures which maximise the overlap and linkages mat exists between the wine and tourism industries.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Niki Macionis

The last few years has seen an unprecedented interest in the marketing and development of wine and culinary tourism, both overseas and in Australia (Macionis, 1998)…

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1048

Abstract

The last few years has seen an unprecedented interest in the marketing and development of wine and culinary tourism, both overseas and in Australia (Macionis, 1998). Indeed, wine and food have become integral components of the tourism product and experience (Hall, et.al., forthcoming). For example, Tourism NSW's Food and Wine in Tourism Plan (Tourism NSW, 1996:2) states that it is the “beginning of [and] effort to bring food and wine into the tourism mainstream,” while regional areas such as NSW's Central West have launched the Cowra‐Orange‐Mudgee Experience (COME), which focuses on food and wine as the “hook to lure more visitors” (Downey, 1998:6). Despite the increasing recognition of the role of wine and food in attracting visitors and the often quoted synergy and complementary nature of the wine and tourism sectors (King, 1998; Connel and Gibson, forthcoming) there has been little specific focus on wine, food and tourism linkages. In addition, wine tourism is often viewed only from the perspective of cellar door visitation and tasting (King, 1998), with little consideration placed on conceptualising wine tourism away from the winery. For example, many tourists' first experience with local or regional wines is often far removed from the cellar door, occurring at their hotel or at a restaurant. As such there are considerable opportunities in more explicitly linking and marketing the wine and food products in a tourism context. This paper reports on an exploratory examination and analysis of the nature and extent of linkages and relationships between the wine, food and tourism sectors in the Canberra Region. Based on extensive interviews with Canberra restaurateurs, it examines the potential of wine and food tourism in a developing wine region, highlights practices and perceptions that restrict the development of productive linkages between the wine and food sectors, and explores opportunities for strategic marketing activities that will benefit both industries at both a micro (i.e. individual enterprise) and a macro (destinational product development and marketing) level.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

W. Glen Croy

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the potential of film‐induced tourism to provide sustained economic contribution to destinations.

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4052

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the potential of film‐induced tourism to provide sustained economic contribution to destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review and identifies the economic contribution made by film‐induced tourism.

Findings

It is observed that film‐induced tourism only provides a sustained economic contribution to destinations in exceptional circumstances.

Practical implications

Destinations need to incorporate film as a functional component of their management. Managers need to focus on the subtle roles film plays in destination awareness, motivation, and image and expectation formation. This focus is best deployed in connecting film audiences with the destination, and tourist experiences available.

Originality/value

The paper questions the emphasis placed on film as a tourism‐inducing agent and at same time, illustrates that film has a subtle influence and this requires further emphasis by destination managers.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Noëlle O'Connor

The purpose of this paper is to explain why the film‐induced tourism sector is growing and outline the key questions that are likely to affect the future development of…

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1246

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain why the film‐induced tourism sector is growing and outline the key questions that are likely to affect the future development of this sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The theme issue is profiled and the purpose and approach of each article explained in the context of the overall strategic question: how can the film‐inducted tourism phenomenon be sustainably managed?

Findings

The paper concludes that there is both a need and an opportunity for dialogue and interchange between practitioners and academics.

Practical implications

The paper explores the key issues affecting the growth of film‐induced tourism around the globe.

Originality/value

The paper identifies and explores facets of the relatively new film‐induced tourism phenomenon.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Oscar Ricci

Celebrity‐spotters actively pursue celebrities in order to take photographs of them. This often involves extensive travelling, sometimes to remote destinations. The…

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685

Abstract

Purpose

Celebrity‐spotters actively pursue celebrities in order to take photographs of them. This often involves extensive travelling, sometimes to remote destinations. The purpose of this paper is to analyse this new type of tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to understand this new type of tourism, the authors used a textual analysis of Italian celebrity‐spotting web sites and 31 in‐depth interviews with celebrity‐spotters.

Findings

The main characteristics of the celebrity‐spotters can be outlined: they practise a sort of “precision tourism”, characterised by close attention to the news in order to know where to go, flexibility for changing locations at the last moment, and a natural predisposition for new technologies. Celebrity‐spotting is not just an observational tourism, but rather a performing one; they must take photographs, gain access to the right places and ambush their targets.

Practical implications

Knowing the characteristics of celebrity‐spotters can help to better understand this new type of tourism, which has yet to be exploited by the tourism industry.

Originality/value

The paper presents an in‐depth analysis of a rather unknown and unexplored type of tourist.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Richard Butler

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the extent to which film locations affect the decision making of tourists and overall attractiveness of film locations as tourist…

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1478

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the extent to which film locations affect the decision making of tourists and overall attractiveness of film locations as tourist destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the relative appeal of fictional and authentic film locations with reference to the literature and film case study examples.

Findings

Arguably, the attractiveness of an actual location shown in a film is greater than a location portrayed by a film, and when tourists do visit film locations in considerable numbers, the impacts are not always beneficial.

Practical implications

The paper uses examples to explore the scope and related impacts of film‐induced tourism.

Originality/value

The paper draws on a wide range of examples to highlight the implications of fictional and authentic locations in films.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Sangkyun Kim and Noëlle O'Connor

The purpose of this paper is a cross‐cultural analysis to compare the profiles of international screen‐tourists by nationalities. Also it investigates the screen‐tourism…

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1987

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is a cross‐cultural analysis to compare the profiles of international screen‐tourists by nationalities. Also it investigates the screen‐tourism concept as associated with the Hallyu phenomenon. Owing to the nature of the topic being examined, an instrument with study‐specific items was created.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives of this paper were achieved through the critical review of previous screen‐tourism literature combined with a structured on‐site survey which included both open‐ and close‐ended questions with inbound tourists who were visiting the Daejanggeum Theme Park in South Korea.

Findings

The principal value of this study can be seen in its offering of a general overview of the characteristics of screen‐tourists induced by the television drama Daejanggeum. The outcomes of this study concurred with the findings of some previous research which indicated the powerful impact of consuming popular media products including television dramas on destination choice and increase in tourist numbers. Therefore, the findings present a considerable amount of insight into the screen‐tourism phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the overall success of the research methodology, a number of limitations were identified. Probably, the most significant of these relates to the generalisability of the results. Whilst this research has contributed to the existing knowledge of screen‐tourism, it would undoubtedly be beneficial to build on it through further research. In particular, research that would examine whether the main findings identified here are more widely representative would be useful. A multi‐destination paper could be undertaken in which would provide rich, comparative data on the nature and characteristics of the phenomenon in other such destinations.

Practical implications

This paper will be of value to academics and industry practitioners interested in screen‐tourism and indeed tourism in general as well as students studying the screen‐tourism phenomenon. The results of this study could benefit destination managers, academics, film and television stakeholders who have an interest in screen‐tourism destination development.

Originality/value

This paper offers a general overview of socio‐demographic characteristics of international screen‐tourists induced by a television drama and it explores the differences in screen‐tourists' profiles including travel patterns and screen product preference in the inter‐Asian dimension. The paper addresses a gap in the literature on the area of cross‐cultural analysis and the screen‐tourist.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Simon Hudson

The purpose of this paper is to show how an increasing number of film and tourism industry stakeholders are working together with the dual goals of attracting film…

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3650

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how an increasing number of film and tourism industry stakeholders are working together with the dual goals of attracting film production and then capitalizing on the subsequent exposure.

Design/methodology/approach

Recently published reports and articles related to the film industry and film tourism in particular are thoroughly reviewed.

Findings

Although most tourism organizations and film commissions have been slow to tap the potential benefits of film tourism, the examples highlighted show how partnerships between the two industries can be mutually beneficial.

Practical implications

If leveraged well, film tourism can have large economic gains for countries and regions. Destination marketing organizations should be working with film commissions and engaging in marketing activities at four distinct stages of a film's lifecycle; before production of a film, during production, during release of the film, and after release.

Originality/value

This is the first full film tourism paper to reflect on existing collaboration between the film and tourism industries.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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