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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2020

Niki Glaveli

This study aims to uncover the underlying multiple intervening mechanisms between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and customer loyalty. Social identity and social…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to uncover the underlying multiple intervening mechanisms between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and customer loyalty. Social identity and social exchange theories offer the ground for prediction that the primary outcomes of CSR initiatives are customer–company (C–C) identification and customer trust, which in turn affect customer loyalty. Also, the differential effect of CSR behaviors toward specific stakeholder groups on customer attitudes and behaviors are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 333 customers of telecommunication companies in Greece. Structural equation modeling was used to test the postulated relationships.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that both C–C identification and customer trust intervene in the relationship between customer perceptions of CSR and customer loyalty; however, the identification mechanism is stronger than the trust mechanism in building customer loyalty while C–C identification seems to drive customer trust. Moreover, out of the three CSR components (customers, employees, and society/environment) that were considered as relevant to customers and were investigated, customer-centric activities were found to be the stronger predictor of both C–C identification and customer trust. Also, CSR toward society/environment was found to positively influence C–C identification.

Practical implications

The findings of this research can assist practitioners in effectively conceptualizing CSR image from a customers’ point of view and designing their company’s CSR and communication strategies to boost positive customer responses and strong long-term relationships.

Originality/value

The current study provides further insights into the complex relationship between CSR and customer responses and the impact that different CSR activities may have on customers.

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2017

Niki Glaveli and Konstantinos Geormas

The purpose of this paper is to deepen and expand our understanding on how strategic/market orientation (SO/MO) and a cohesive/shared social vision affect performance in…

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1181

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deepen and expand our understanding on how strategic/market orientation (SO/MO) and a cohesive/shared social vision affect performance in the social enterprise (SE) context.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in Greek SEs. Stepwise and simple regression analyses were applied in order to test the hypothesized relationships among the study variables. Additionally, Baron and Kenny’s (1986) recommendation for exploring mediating effects was followed.

Findings

The results indicate the crucial role of customer orientation dimension of SO/MO in enhancing commercial effectiveness and subsequently profitability, whilst a cohesive/shared vision was found to have positive direct associations with the social effectiveness and profitability elements of SEs performance. Moreover, the findings provide some indications for the mutually reinforcing relationship between the social and commercial aspects of SEs functioning.

Originality/value

The current paper contributes to the ongoing quest to understand the strategic management element of SEs and the challenge they face in managing rival logics. Also, it addresses the gap related to the type (mainly qualitative) and geographical concentration of SE research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Charalambos Spathis, Eugenia Petridou and Niki Glaveli

This paper discusses the service quality of Greek banks on the basis of their customers’ perceptions, and analyses how gender differences affect customers’ perceptions of…

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6720

Abstract

This paper discusses the service quality of Greek banks on the basis of their customers’ perceptions, and analyses how gender differences affect customers’ perceptions of service quality dimensions such as effectiveness and assurance, access, price, tangibles, service portfolio, and reliability. The results of an empirical study of 1,260 customers of Greek banks generally support the hypothesis that gender affects service quality perceptions and the relative importance attached to various banking service quality dimensions. This paper provides important information for bank managers to use in developing operational, human resource, and marketing strategies, and in targeting those strategies in terms of the gender differences in quality perceptions among their customers.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Niki Glaveli, Fotios Vouzas and Myrsine Roumeliotou

The current study provides insights on the application of critical soft TQM practices in primary and secondary education and their impact on teachers' job satisfaction (TJS).

Abstract

Purpose

The current study provides insights on the application of critical soft TQM practices in primary and secondary education and their impact on teachers' job satisfaction (TJS).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of the literature related to TQM application in primary and secondary education, six soft TQM elements were traced as critical to the success of TQM implementation in the school environment: participation/involvement in continuous improvement, teamwork, empowerment, appraisal systems/recognition and reward for quality, training and development (T&D) and leadership (vision/commitment to quality culture). Moreover, their relationship to JS was theoretically founded and empirically tested. An online questionnaire was used as the research instrument. The participants were 200 primary and secondary public school teachers working in urban, semi urban and rural regions of Greece. After assessing the validity and reliability of the measurement scales, multiple regression analysis was applied to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The research findings revealed that leadership and empowerment are the most highly implemented TQM practices in primary and secondary education. Moreover, participation/involvement, appraisal systems/recognition and rewards and leadership were the TQM elements that had a positive association with TJS.

Practical implications

The outcomes of the study are of help to school principals and policy-makers in order to design and implement TQM policies that advance the quality of teaching and the effectiveness of processes in the primary and secondary education system, as well as to satisfy and motivate teachers for continuous improvement.

Originality/value

This was, to the best of our knowledge, the first study that has explored the impact of soft TQM elements on TJS.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Niki Glaveli, Eugenia Petridou, Chris Liassides and Charalambos Spathis

Despite the rapid growth and internationalisation of services and financial services in particular, managers realise that to successfully leverage service quality as a…

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5297

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the rapid growth and internationalisation of services and financial services in particular, managers realise that to successfully leverage service quality as a global competitive tool, they first need to correctly identify the antecedents of what the international consumer perceives as service quality. This paper aims to examine the differences: in perceptions of service quality; and in the ranking of quality dimension between the bank customers of five Balkan countries: Greece, Bulgaria, Albania, FYROM and Serbia.

Design/methodology/approach

Bahia and Nantel proposed a specific scale for measuring perceived service quality in retail banking consisting of six dimensions of service quality: effectiveness and assurance; access; price; tangibles; service portfolio; and reliability. This instrument was used for collecting data in the context of banking services from the five Balkan countries. T‐test and factor analysis were employed to answer the research questions.

Findings

The results suggest that Greek customers perceived receiving the highest level of service quality. Differences and similarities between the countries were also reported related to the degree of importance attached to the BSQ dimensions of service quality.

Practical implications

The results have significant implications for banks in developing operational, marketing and human resource strategies in the Balkan context.

Originality/value

The international bank managers need to understand the value of environmental differences between countries in terms of economic development, political situation, socio‐cultural system and the level of sector maturity. Accordingly they can emphasise the various dimensions of service quality differently and in addition focus on commonalities to introduce quality initiatives in the Balkans.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Eleonora Karassvidou and Niki Glaveli

The purpose of this paper is to seek to provide support and extend work-family Border Theory (BT) in order to investigate organizational and individual factors that…

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1522

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek to provide support and extend work-family Border Theory (BT) in order to investigate organizational and individual factors that determine the complex nature of work-family balance (WFB).

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was conducted in a company in Greece. In total, 20 in-depth interviews were conducted. Data analysis was guided by interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

The key findings illustrate that strong borders protect the investigated, powerful, work domain and expand only to accommodate its’ needs. In congruence with BT, employees choose to be central participants in the powerful, highly impermeable and inflexibly bordered, work domain. The deeply entrenched organizational culture, as well as leaders’ behavior and leadership style, support the development of an array of positive work attitudes which boost central participation in the work domain. Due to the strongly bordered work setting, employees were found to choose segmentation as a WFB cope strategy; however, shifts in the participants’ life phase, as well as unfulfilled expectations, lead them to reset priorities and reevaluate their central participation in the dominant work domain.

Practical implications

The present study has implications for HR practitioners. Communication and open discussions on work-family themes reveal issues that can positively contribute to WFB. Further to this, organizations need to consider individual differences when they deal with WFB issues and frame interventions to facilitate this process.

Originality/value

This paper adds to current thinking in BT by illustrating that organizational culture, leadership and work attitudes have a strong impact on the nature of the work domain and its borders, as well as on employees’ central participation in the work setting and the attained WFB.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2007

Eugenia Petridou, Charalambos Spathis, Niki Glaveli and Chris Liassides

Despite the rapid growth and internationalisation of the services sector, particularly financial services, managers today realize that to successfully leverage service…

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3448

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the rapid growth and internationalisation of the services sector, particularly financial services, managers today realize that to successfully leverage service quality as a global competitive tool, they first need to correctly identify the antecedents of what the international consumer perceives as service quality. This paper aims to assess and compare the level of bank service quality provided in Greece and Bulgaria and to identify the dimensions of quality service in the two countries.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2000 Bahia and Nantel proposed a specific scale, the BSQ, (Bank Service Quality) for measuring perceived service quality in retail banking consisting of six dimensions: effectiveness and assurance; access; price; tangibles; service portfolio; and reliability. This tool was used for the collection of data related to the banking services provided in the two countries (Greece and Bulgaria). Statistical methods, such as the t‐test, chi‐square, Cronbach's‐alpha and factor analysis, were then employed to answer the research questions.

Findings

The results suggest that the Greek customers' perception was that they received higher quality services compared to the perception of the Bulgarian clients. Differences between the countries were also reported regarding the dimensionality of quality service.

Practical implications

The results have significant implications for banks in developing operational, marketing and human resource strategies in the two countries.

Originality/value

Greece and Bulgaria – two countries with different economic, political and socio‐cultural backgrounds – give the opportunity for cross‐country research in the area of service quality, an area where research is not very mature.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Athanasios G. Noulas, Niki Glaveli and Ioannis Kiriakopoulos

The purpose of this study is to examine the cost efficiency of 58 branches of a major Greek commercial bank, in six major Greek cities, for the years 2000 and 2001.

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1450

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the cost efficiency of 58 branches of a major Greek commercial bank, in six major Greek cities, for the years 2000 and 2001.

Design/methodology/approach

The efficiency is measured through the data envelopment analysis (DEA) method. Using regression analysis, the effect of size on cost efficiency is also examined.

Findings

The results indicate that there is a room for substantial efficiency improvements. The average inefficiency is about 30 per cent. It has also been observed that rural branches tend, on average, to be more efficient than urban branches.

Research limitations/implications

A direction of future research would be to extend the analysis of determinants of bank branch efficiency in order to investigate the role that the region and the characteristics of the branch play in relation to efficiency.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comparative evaluation of the efficiency of 58 branches of a major Greek commercial bank using the DEA method.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Eleonora Karassavidou, Niki Glaveli and Chrissoleon T. Papadopoulos

National Health Systems (NHS) experience low trust and lack of public confidence while receiving strong pressure from governments and societies to improve their quality

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2019

Abstract

Purpose

National Health Systems (NHS) experience low trust and lack of public confidence while receiving strong pressure from governments and societies to improve their quality and compete effectively. The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, to investigate how patients perceive service quality in Greek NHS hospitals. Second, to assess patients' perceptions, expectations and the relevant gaps concerning the quality provided by public hospitals. Third, to determine the relative importance of quality dimensions in influencing patients' overall quality perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical research using the SERVQUAL instrument was conducted in six NHS hospitals located in North Greece. A total of 137 usable questionnaires were collected.

Findings

The research results revealed a three‐dimension SERVQUAL construct, which proved to be a valid, reliable and flexible tool for measuring quality in Greek hospitals. The human factor was revealed as being the most critical dimension of quality, reflecting the significance of the traditional view of the doctor‐patient relationship. Quality gaps are illuminated, suggesting that there is room for improvement initiatives.

Practical implications

The paper provides guidelines to hospital managers and policymakers as to developing strategies that aim at meeting patients' expectations of service quality and restoring trust in public hospitals.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on service quality, a critical aspect of hospital performance, drawing attention to patients' orientations. The study gives support to the view that quality in hospitals can be determined, measured and systematically monitored with the goal of responding to patients' needs.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Niki Glaveli and Stella Kufidu

The purpose of this paper is to present and analyse the changes that took place in the Greek banking industry in the last years, their impact on strategy and the role of…

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1811

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and analyse the changes that took place in the Greek banking industry in the last years, their impact on strategy and the role of employees' training and development for strategy implementation and success.

Design/methodology/approach

Using four case studies attempts to investigate the effect of the environmental changes on these particular banks and the role of their training and development strategies in adjusting themselves to the changing industry environment.

Findings

Changes in the external environment have reshaped the banking industry environment. Responding to that Greek banks have adopted new strategies. Differentiation on the basis of quality offered and diversification were the main focus of their competitive strategy. The rapid growth and products diversity engendered by a changing internal and external environment fostered by deregulation created a need for additional and more focused training and development. The beneficial effects of training were expected in terms of skills, cultural and role changes, homogenisation and decrease of tensions and insecurities, motivation, commitment, customer satisfaction, reduction of conflict in the workplace and finally quality improvement.

Originality/value

Shows that the changes in the external environment have initiated an emphasis on more strategic and integrated training and development effort for Greek banks.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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