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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Nikhil D. Rao, Anton Paramithas and Arum Parthipun

Patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) must be transferred between one hospital, seven miles away to a trust, for access to the V/Q scanner. The aim of this audit…

Abstract

Purpose

Patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) must be transferred between one hospital, seven miles away to a trust, for access to the V/Q scanner. The aim of this audit was to examine delays in obtaining scans and delays in same day reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used the Same Working Day guidelines (National Diagnostic Imaging board (UK); the target was 90 per cent. The indicators were: time from request to scan attendance; time from scan to typed, accessible report. Data from 141 inpatient V/Q scans between March 2009 and 2010 were collected retrospectively. In the re‐audit 89 V/Q scans for the period of June 2010 to May 2011 were collected retrospectively.

Findings

In the first round there were 31 scans from EGH and 110 from StH. Overall 64 per cent of scans were reported on the same day. There was a significant delay in scanning EGH patients due to transportation. The introduction of voice recognition software was aimed at reducing the time between dictation and reports being available for viewing. CT Pulmonary Angiograms (CTPA) would be utilised more at EGH as it was available on site. In the second round there were 62 scans at STH, 27 at EGH. Overall, 84 per cent scans were reported on the same working day. This was a statistically significant improvement (p=0.001). Only 17 per cent of scans were reported after 12 hours.

Originality/value

Speech recognition software should allow a more efficient method of diagnosing and reporting pulmonary embolism, which in turn assists in patient management.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Parvatini Sri Naga Venkat, A. Srinath, Gurram Narendra Santosh Kumar, P. Vijay and Rentala Venkatesh

The design of robot hand for writing and correction assistant applications work will be partially replaced as to develop the remote-assisted robot hand control needed to…

Abstract

Purpose

The design of robot hand for writing and correction assistant applications work will be partially replaced as to develop the remote-assisted robot hand control needed to manipulate all this kind of work. As it is stress and strain full job for all teachers, which needs to bring a sustainable solution, hence robot hand which resembles the human hand which is teleoperated with the remote control is designed.

Design/methodology/approach

This work presents the design and simulation of a robot hand for correction assistant applications. To replace the work partially especially for the teachers who are undergoing the paper correction work like putting tick mark, cross mark, allocation of marks, etc.

Findings

In this paper the design of the same and its simulation of writing the horizontal line, vertical line and writing number two is presented, in further research, a prototype model and its analysis will be done.

Originality/value

The design is been done using the modelling software Creo 5.4 where the design will be used to print the prototype model which is physical using 3D printing technology and controlling and testing will be done on the same prototype model using simple Arduino.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Unmanned Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-6427

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Soumyabrato Bagchi and Bhaskar Chakrabarti

The aim of this paper is to develop a theory of organizational forgetting in the context of local governments from the paradigmatic lens of existing research orchestrated…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to develop a theory of organizational forgetting in the context of local governments from the paradigmatic lens of existing research orchestrated in management literature. The paper empirically explores how and why local governments forget and discusses the role of local politics in promoting memory loss in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors do an ethnographic study in a Village Panchayat, the lowest tier of the local government in rural India, in West Bengal, a state in eastern India. Data are collected through participant observation and informal interviews.

Findings

The paper argues that the existing framework on modes of organizational forgetting developed in the management literature is not sufficient in understanding the types of knowledge loss that occur in local governments. It shows that as a consequence of “memory decay” and “failure to capture,” local governments involuntary lose past knowledge and critical sources of expertise. The study also acknowledges the role of politics in deliberately endorsing organizational forgetting in local governments to eliminate failure and ethical lapses of elected representatives.

Originality/value

By exploring the phenomenon of organizational forgetting in local governments in the context of grassroots politics, this paper contributes to the ongoing discussion of organizational forgetting in a hitherto understudied area of how, and under what circumstances, public organizations such as local governments undergo forgetting, unlearning or loss of knowledge.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Nikhil Padhye and Kalyanmoy Deb

The goal of this study is to carry out multi‐objective optimization by considering minimization of surface roughness (Ra) and build time (T) in selective laser sintering…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to carry out multi‐objective optimization by considering minimization of surface roughness (Ra) and build time (T) in selective laser sintering (SLS) process, which are functions of “build orientation”. Evolutionary algorithms are applied for this purpose. The performance comparison of the optimizers is done based on statistical measures. In order to find truly optimal solutions, local search is proposed. An important task of decision making, i.e. the selection of one solution in the presence of multiple trade‐off solutions, is also addressed. Analysis of optimal solutions is done to gain insight into the problem behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The minimization of Ra and T is done using two popular optimizers – multi‐objective genetic algorithm (non‐dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA‐II)) and multi‐objective particle swarm optimizers (MOPSO). Standard measures from evolutionary computation – “hypervolume measure” and “attainment surface approximator” have been borrowed to compare the optimizers. Decision‐making schemes are proposed in this paper based on decision theory.

Findings

The objects are categorized into groups, which bear similarity in optimal solutions. NSGA‐II outperforms MOPSO. The similarity of spread and convergence patterns of NSGA‐II and MOPSO ensures that obtained solutions are (or are close to) Pareto‐optimal set. This is validated by local search. Based on the analysis of obtained solutions, general trends for optimal orientations (depending on the geometrical features) are found.

Research limitations/implications

A novel and systematic way to address multi‐objective optimization decision‐making post‐optimal analysis is shown. Simulations utilize experimentally derived models for roughness and build time. A further step could be the experimental verification of findings provided in this study.

Practical implications

This study provides a thorough methodology to find optimal build orientations in SLS process. A route to decipher valuable problem information through post‐optimal analysis is shown. The principles adopted in this study are general and can be extended to other rapid prototyping (RP) processes and expected to find wide applicability.

Originality/value

This paper is a distinct departure from past studies in RP and demonstrates the concepts of multi‐objective optimization, decision‐making and related issues.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Nikhil Gogna and Arvind Kumar

The present study aims to use goat (Bhakarwali spp.) meat and its edible offal (heart and liver) in preparation of goat pickle and to enhance its shelf-life using…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to use goat (Bhakarwali spp.) meat and its edible offal (heart and liver) in preparation of goat pickle and to enhance its shelf-life using food-grade glucono-delta-lactone (GDL) as the preservative.

Design/methodology/approach

The goat meat was used at 50 per cent and edible offals were used at 50 per cent, whereas liver and heart were used at 25 per cent each in the preparation of goat pickle. This formulation of goat meat pickle was prepared in two different oils, namely, mustard oil and olive oil. These designer goat meat pickles were evaluated based on physicochemical and sensory evaluation. Further, GDL was added to these designer pickles prepared in both mustard and olive oil, as preservatives and studied for its storage quality for 90 days at room temperature (30 ± 2°C). The prepared goat meat pickle was evaluated for physico-chemical, sensory and microbiological profiles on 0th, 15th, 30th, 45th, 60th, 75th and 90th day.

Findings

The pH was recorded significant (p < 0.05) decrease on successive days irrespective of oils (mustard and olive oil) and GDL as acidifying agent and preservative used, respectively, but the rate of decrease in pH was comparatively lower in goat pickle with added GDL. The protein, fats and ash levels significantly (p < 0.05) increased, and the moisture level significantly (p < 0.05) decreased from 0th day to 90th day of storage irrespective of oils and preservatives used. The overall acceptability score of goat pickle made in olive oil and with added GDL was significantly (p < 0.05) higher during storage. The designer goat pickle with addition of GDL was safe for human consumption even after 90 days, whereas designer goat pickle without addition of GDL, was safe till 60th day of storage.

Research limitations/implications

The shelf-life of the product was evaluated till only 90 days, which should have been extended. However, the study was committed towards assessing the problem for only 90 days.

Practical implications

GDL can be used to preserve the goat pickle made of meat, and edible offal can be preserved for more than 90 days.

Social implications

Because of utilization of edible offal, even low-income groups of population can consume animal protein at a lower cost.

Originality/value

Thus, the used food grade GDL at 0.02 per cent enhanced the shelf-life of the prepared designer goat pickle stored at room temperature (30 ± 20°C) by lowering its pH and acted as an excellent preservative.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 8 March 2021

K. Jhansi Rani

Right to Information (RTI) is a formidable tool in the hands of responsible citizens to fight corruption and ensure transparency and accountability within a participatory…

Abstract

Right to Information (RTI) is a formidable tool in the hands of responsible citizens to fight corruption and ensure transparency and accountability within a participatory democracy. The RTI Act was promulgated in India in October 2005, and has fundamentally changed the power equation between the government and citizens. T.his chapter examines the contribution of the Act, in particular playing a significant role by providing information necessary to combat corruption in India. It is also noted, however, that RTI is not an unmixed-blessing as it is seen how costly it has been for zealous investigative journalists.

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2007

Pradip Thomas

In assessing the contribution made by telecommunications in India by the state and civil society to public service, this article aims to identify the state's initial

Abstract

Purpose

In assessing the contribution made by telecommunications in India by the state and civil society to public service, this article aims to identify the state's initial reluctance to recognise telecommunications provision as a basic need as against the robust tradition of public service aligned to the postal services and finds hope in the renewal of public service telecommunications via the Right to Information movement.

Design/methodology/approach

This article follows a history of telecommunications approach that is conversant with the political economy tradition. It uses archival sources, personal correspondence, and published information as its primary material.

Findings

The findings suggest that public service telecommunication is a relatively “new” concept in the annals of Indian telecommunications and that a de‐regulated environment along with the Right to Information movement holds significant hope for making public service telecommunications a real alternative.

Originality/value

This article provides a reflexive, critical account of public service telecommunications in India and suggests that it can be strengthened by learnings gained from the continual renewal of public service ideals and action by the postal services and a people‐based demand model linked to the Right to Information Movement.

Details

info, vol. 9 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 13 August 2013

Ravichandran Ramamoorthy

The case illustrates the sequence of events that played out between the customer and his interaction with a Bank from which he availed a credit card and a loan. The…

Abstract

The case illustrates the sequence of events that played out between the customer and his interaction with a Bank from which he availed a credit card and a loan. The failure of service deliverables and deficiencies in the processes of the bank resulted in default of the loan amount and inconvenienced the customer. In the case, the focus on the customer helps in understanding that organizations need to initiate responses for customer satisfaction at their interface points, as expected by its customers. The case is suitable for use in courses on ‘Services Marketing’ for Post Graduate courses and Management Development Programmes.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Case study
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the different options available for funding; to illustrate the growth of the food services industry in India; and to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the different options available for funding; to illustrate the growth of the food services industry in India; and to understand a business model canvas.

Case overview/synopsis

Baromeeter (BOM), was a Delhi-based startup founded in the year 2016 by Rishabh Vyas, a 26-year-old MBA graduate. Currently, BOM has operations in Delhi-NCR with 50,000 monthly website visitors and 200-plus partner restaurants and cafes in Delhi-NCR with brands such as Imperfecto, Junkyard Café, Garam Dharam, Out of the Box, Boombox, Jungle Jamboree and many more. BOM also receives over 1,000 deal bookings and 200 plus party bookings monthly. Going forward, Rishabh has plans to expand to other cities such as Mumbai, Hyderabad, Pune and Bangalore. However, there are certain challenges. So far, the startup has raised funds from friends and families. He was confident that he had a compelling product. However, he knew he had to look for fresh investments to scale up. The existing funds may sustain the operations of the company for another six months. Rishabh was considering a number of options. However, whom to approach? Would banks be interested in lending money? How about participating in angel investor’s meet?

Complexity academic level

The case is suitable for a course in graduate and an undergraduate course in entrepreneurship. The case can be used to understand the business model canvas and to understand the funding options available for startups.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Case study
Publication date: 15 January 2015

Sanjeev Tripathi and Kopal Agrawal Dhandhania

The Olympic Gold Quest (OGQ) was founded as a Non-profit to support Indian athletes in their quest to win Olympic Gold medals by bridging the gap between the best athletes…

Abstract

The Olympic Gold Quest (OGQ) was founded as a Non-profit to support Indian athletes in their quest to win Olympic Gold medals by bridging the gap between the best athletes in India and in the world. The support from OGQ has been instrumental to India in winning its highest number of medals at any summer Olympics. Buoyed by this success, OGQ has set up a target of achieving eight Olympic medals at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. With OGQ relying on donations to support the athletes, the challenge is to market the Olympic cause by creating, communicating, and delivering the right offering for its donors.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

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