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Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2014

Nik Taylor and Lindsay Hamilton

The last few decades have seen the rise of a new field of inquiry – human–animal studies (HAS). As a rich, theoretically and disciplinarily diverse field, HAS shines a…

Abstract

Purpose

The last few decades have seen the rise of a new field of inquiry – human–animal studies (HAS). As a rich, theoretically and disciplinarily diverse field, HAS shines a light on the various relations that humans have with other animals across time, space and culture. While still a small, but rapidly growing field, HAS has supported the development of multiple theoretical and conceptual initiatives which have aimed to capture the rich diversity of human–animal interactions. Yet the methodologies for doing this have not kept pace with the ambitions of such projects. In this chapter, we seek to shed light on this particular issue.

Design/methodology/approach

We consider the difficulties of researching other-than-human beings by asking what might happen if methods incorporated true inter-disciplinarity, for instance if social scientists were able to work with natural scientists on multi-species ethnographies. The lack of established methodology (and the lack of cross disciplinary research between the natural and social sciences) is one of the main problems that we consider here. It is an issue complicated immensely by the ‘otherness’ of animals – the vast differences in the ways that we (humans) and they (animals) see the world, communicate and behave. This chapter provides the opportunity for us to consider how we can take account of (if not resolve) these differences to arrive at meaningful research data, to better understand the contemporary world by embarking upon more precise investigations of our relationships with animals.

Findings

Drawing upon a selection of examples from contemporary research of human–animal interactions, both ethnographic and scientific, we shed light on some new possibilities for multi-species research. We suggest that this can be done best by considering and applying a diversity of theoretical frameworks which deal explicitly with the constitution of the social environment.

Originality/value

Our methodological exploration offers the reader insight into new ways of working within the template of human animal studies by drawing upon a range of useful theories such as post-structuralism and actor network theory (ANT) (for example, Callon, 1986; Hamilton & Taylor, 2013; Latour, 2005; Law, Ruppert, & Savage, 2011) and post-humanist perspectives (for example, Anderson, 2014; Haraway, 2003; Wolfe, 2010). Our contribution to this literature is distinctive because rather than remaining at the philosophical level, we suggest how the human politics of method might be navigated practically to the benefit of multiple species.

Details

Big Data? Qualitative Approaches to Digital Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-050-6

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Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Big Data? Qualitative Approaches to Digital Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-050-6

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Lindsay Hamilton and Nik Taylor

Traditionally, ethnography has been well placed to take account of the messy and complex processes that produce workplace cultures. Likewise, it has always taken interest…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, ethnography has been well placed to take account of the messy and complex processes that produce workplace cultures. Likewise, it has always taken interest in the objects, materials and symbolic artifacts that help furnish those organizational cultures. Yet researchers face a particular challenge when the organization in question includes animals. The purpose of this paper is to ask: How do we take account of such others? Are they objects, things, agents or should they be considered to be workers?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors consider several examples of animal‐human workplaces, including abattoirs, laboratories and farms, to argue that ethnography can, and should, take account of animals in creative new ways. First‐hand experience of such settings is drawn upon to argue that contemporary post‐human scholarship and the creative arts offer the potential for more subtle research methods.

Findings

The authors’ fieldwork shows that it is not always a straightforward desire to care for other species that motivates people to work with animals. Instead, a range of unexpected meanings can be drawn from the interaction with animals. It is also unsatisfactory to claim that those working with animals are always motivated by the promise of paid employment. In many cases, notably the rescue shelter, work is often done on a voluntary basis. So the rewards are not always financial but reach into more symbolic and ethical domains of value creation. Conversely, in slaughterhouses, the mechanization of the shopfloor makes it difficult for workers to relate to the “products” as animals at all. The repetitive nature of this work disconnects those on the production line from the idea that they are dealing with bodies. The complexity of these human‐animal relationships means that field methods for studying them must be adapted and evolved.

Originality/value

This paper provokes some new questions about human‐animal meaning making for organizational ethnographers. It does so to generate creative new ideas about field methods and the nature of the “others” that researchers participate with to observe.

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Big Data? Qualitative Approaches to Digital Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-050-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Big Data? Qualitative Approaches to Digital Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-050-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Filzah Md Isa, Shaista Noor, Nik Maheran Nik Mohammad and Mohd Muttaqin Mohd Adnan

The ageing population is a rising issue worldwide, including in Malaysia, which leads to an increase in older people compared to children. Malaysia is a relatively…

Abstract

Purpose

The ageing population is a rising issue worldwide, including in Malaysia, which leads to an increase in older people compared to children. Malaysia is a relatively “younger” country compared to its Asian counterparts such as Japan and China. The demographic projections by the Department of Statistics of Malaysia state that by 2035 approximately 15% of its population would be above 60 years old. The powerful demographic trend of the ageing of the Malaysian population has consequences for the entire society and its economy. One of the biggest challenges for the Malaysian Government is to provide adequate facilities to the elderly in terms of care and support. For this purpose, around 365 registered and various unregistered centres are working throughout Malaysia, including Sabah and Sarawak. The government, non-governmental organisations, the private sector and various religious organisations run these centres. These centres provide residential and health-care services to elderlies, whereas the centre’s operators face multiple challenges in the overall operation of the centre. The purpose of this study to highlight the leadership and decision making challenges among elderly care centre operators.

Design/methodology/approach

The result highlights that both men and women operators face leadership and decision-making challenges for centre management. Regarding decision-making, women are experiencing more failures in proper decision-making than men. However, women operators are keen to learn from failures for appropriate decision-making.

Findings

The result highlights that both men and women operators face leadership and decision-making challenges for centre management. Regarding decision-making, women are experiencing more failures in proper decision-making than men. However, women operators are keen to learn from failures for appropriate decision-making. The present study will help the new operators to persevere in their business ventures, and policymakers look into the best supports to enhance elderly care centre operator’s success.

Originality/value

The present study will help the new operators to persevere in their business ventures, and policymakers look into the best supports to enhance elderly care centre operator’s success.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Irfan Anjum Badruddin, Azeem Khan, Mohd Yamani Idna Idris, N. Nik-Ghaali, Salman Ahmed N.J. and Abdullah A.A.A. Al-Rashed

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the advantages of a simplified algorithm to solve the problem of heat and mass transfer in porous medium by reducing the number…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the advantages of a simplified algorithm to solve the problem of heat and mass transfer in porous medium by reducing the number of partial differential equations from four to three.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of the present paper is to develop a simplified algorithm to reduce the number of equations involved in conjugate heat transfer in porous medium.

Findings

Developed algorithm/method has many advantages over conventional method of solution for conjugate heat transfer in porous medium.

Research limitations/implications

The current work is applicable to conjugate heat transfer problem.

Practical implications

The developed algorithm is useful in reducing the number of equations to be solved, thus reducing the computational resources required.

Originality/value

Development of simplified algorithm and comparison with conventional method.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 27 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2018

Nik Hadiyan Nik Azman, Salina Kassim and Adewalee Abideen Adeyemi

This study aims to offer a new area of discourse by investigating the factors determining the usage of the Islamic non-bank financing product ar-rahnu (Islamic…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to offer a new area of discourse by investigating the factors determining the usage of the Islamic non-bank financing product ar-rahnu (Islamic pawnbroking) among women micro-entrepreneurs in Malaysia within the framework of the informal credit market theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on primary data obtained by using self-administered questionnaires distributed in three states in Malaysia: Kedah, Kelantan and Terengganu. The questionnaires were distributed to a total of 750 participants, with each state contributing 250 respondents. Total number of respondents valid for data analysis was however 600.

Findings

Based on descriptive and inferential statistics by using the IBM statistical package for the social sciences and structural equation modelling analysis of moment structures, the results show that the main factor influencing women micro-entrepreneurs to use ar-rahnu is the service charge.

Research limitations/implications

This study only covers three states in Malaysia and is limited to examining the use of ar-rahnu by women micro-entrepreneurs in those states.

Practical implications

As micro-entrepreneur s often face constraints to obtaining financial access in the formal credit market, ar-rahnu provides an alternative mode of obtaining business financing to female micro-entrepreneurs, so they can sustain their operations and even expand their businesses. The significance of such factors like service fee, as revealed in this study, indicates that managers should focus on this element when offering Islamic financial products, especially to women micro-entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

The informal credit market theory is frequently used in conventional studies. This paper adds Sharīʿah compliance in the context of this theory as a new area to be considered when discussing Islamic financial products.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Michele Abendstern, Rowan Jasper, Nik Loynes, Jane Hughes, Caroline Sutcliffe and David Challis

The purpose of this paper is to provide new insights into the contribution and experiences of non-statutory sector (voluntary) services delivering care coordination.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide new insights into the contribution and experiences of non-statutory sector (voluntary) services delivering care coordination.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study, based on face-to-face semi-structured interviews with 17 managers from a range of non-statutory sector services, used thematic data analysis supported by a framework approach.

Findings

Four themes emerged: commissioning arrangements undermined non-statutory sector development; working relationships between statutory and non-statutory services required time and energy to navigate and sustain; the establishment of a niche role in the larger network of provision; and tensions relating to future developments. The non-statutory sector was found to provide a mix of services, including specialist provision targeting specific communities that complemented or substituted for those provided by the state. Managers wanted their services to be recognised by the statutory sector as equal partners in the delivery of care coordination and were also keen to retain their independence.

Practical implications

Findings provide information for service commissioners and managers from statutory and non-statutory sectors indicating a complex set of experiences and views regarding the role of the latter. This is particularly salient in a political landscape which has increasing expectations of their involvement in the provision of care coordination.

Originality/value

This study considers the work of the non-statutory sector in the delivery of care coordination to adults and older people, an area under-reported to date. It suggests that there are opportunities available for these services to become embedded within a wider social care system and to excel by retaining or developing specialist roles and services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 24 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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