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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2018

William James Wilson, Nihal Jayamaha and Greg Frater

This paper aims to theorise and test a causal model of predominantly lean-driven quality improvement (QI) in the context of health-care clinical microsystems, examining…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to theorise and test a causal model of predominantly lean-driven quality improvement (QI) in the context of health-care clinical microsystems, examining the effects contextual factors in this setting have on improvement activity.

Design/methodology/approach

QI practitioners at a New Zealand District Health Board were surveyed on a range of contextual factors hypothesised to influence improvement outcomes. Survey responses were analysed via partial least squares path modelling to test the causal model that was designed to be consistent with the “model for understanding success in quality” (MUSIQ) model (Kaplan et al., 2012) adopted in health-care QI.

Findings

Defined variables for teamwork, respect for people, lean actions and negative motivating factors all demonstrated significant effects. These findings support the representation of the microsystem layer within the MUSIQ model. The final model predicted and explained perceived success well (adjusted R2 = 0.58).

Research limitations/implications

The sample was a non-probability sample and the sample size was small (n = 105), although power analysis indicated that we exceeded the minimum sample size (97 cases). Even though health-care processes have universality, this study was conducted in only one district in New Zealand.

Practical implications

The results support highly functional teamwork as the critical contextual factor in health-care QI outcomes and suggest lean-driven process improvement can be a valid mediating mechanism. The key recommendation for practitioners is to increase focus on human resource capability when initiating and supporting QI.

Originality/value

The originality is testing the robustness of the MUSIQ model specifically in a lean environment, which provides the context for QI. The paper provides a more detailed specification of contextual factors acting as exogenous variables that moderate the cause (lean actions) and the effect (perceived success).

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Nihal P. Jayamaha, Nigel P. Grigg and Robin S. Mann

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the validity of Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence (CPE) for New Zealand organisations and to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the validity of Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence (CPE) for New Zealand organisations and to identify methodological gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

By means of data collected from a sample of 91 New Zealand organisations, through a self‐assessment instrument (as a proxy for the CPE) a structural equation model was studied using the partial least squares method. The measurement validity of the CPE as well as the implied causal relationships in the CPE framework was tested. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to gain additional insights.

Findings

The measurement validity of the CPE was established; of the 13 implied causal relationships in the CPE framework, 11 were statistically significant, which compared favourably with past studies. The results endorse some salient features of quality management: reliance on measurement, analysis, and knowledge management; the involvement of people; and the role of leadership in setting direction.

Research limitations/implications

As the study was based on a small sample, this model needs to be tested with other data sets. The study revealed the need to meta‐analyse past measurement and structural models as well as measurement instruments.

Practical implications

The study endorsed the reliability and validity of a well designed, well administered, self‐assessment instrument.

Originality/value

As the first New Zealand CPE validity study, the paper introduces the partial least squares method and shows some of its relevant versatile features, introducing some measurement perspectives not conceptualised before in CPE validation studies.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Ishani Buddika Soysa, Nihal Palitha Jayamaha and Nigel Peter Grigg

The purpose of this paper is to develop a performance measurement (PM) framework for Australasian nonprofit organisations (NPOs) involved in healthcare, and operational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a performance measurement (PM) framework for Australasian nonprofit organisations (NPOs) involved in healthcare, and operational descriptions for each PM dimension within this framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature relating to the balanced scorecard and other PM frameworks was examined to develop an initial conceptual model, and this model was substantially improved by collecting qualitative data from nine Australian and New Zealand healthcare NPOs using a case study approach.

Findings

The study identifies nine causally related PM dimensions: mission, strategy, organisational capabilities, infrastructure and people development (people and information), financial health, processes, and stakeholder satisfaction (clients, people, and donors). The study also recognised that “Mission” and “Strategy” should be PM dimensions and that healthcare NPOs should focus on satisfying its people, not only donors and clients. Additionally, 41 operational descriptions are developed for each of these dimensions and can enable detailed PM items to be derived by organisations.

Originality/value

The study is the first study that has been undertaken to develop a PM framework for the Australasian NPOs to a level that it can be readily used by the practitioners (following customisation to their own specific context). The developed model also serves as a basis for future quantitative academic research aimed at testing and empirical validation of the conceptual model.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Ishani Buddika Soysa, Nihal Palitha Jayamaha and Nigel Peter Grigg

Using the BSC as the starting point, the purpose of this paper is to present a theory on nonprofit performance management and describes how an overall performance index…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the BSC as the starting point, the purpose of this paper is to present a theory on nonprofit performance management and describes how an overall performance index (OPI) was empirically developed to assess the strategic performance of a nonprofit organisation (NPO).

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was developed from the literature. This was refined into a testable theoretical model using case studies. Thereafter, the theoretical model and an accompanying measurement model on OPI were validated using quantitative data (n=223) collected from a sample of healthcare NPOs in Australasia.

Findings

The measurement model was found to be a good fit to data. The model parameters (weights) pertaining to the OPI represent six PM dimensions (Mission; Strategy; Organisational Capabilities, Infrastructure and People Development; Financial Health; Processes; and Stakeholder Satisfaction) and 13 sub-dimensions. These parameters provide a tenable scoring system to assess the strategic performance of a NPO.

Research limitations/implications

The parameters (hence the scoring system) were estimated from data collected from a particular sector (healthcare) and a region (Australasia).

Practical implications

The findings can be used for comparative benchmarking (e.g. by managers and major donors) of NPOs, better governance and to initiate major performance improvement initiatives.

Originality/value

This study is the first empirical study that has been undertaken to develop an OPI for NPOs. The findings can be readily used by the practitioners.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Anuradha Mathrani, Shanuka Wickramasinghe and Nihal Palitha Jayamaha

Quality management standards (e.g. ISO 9001) lead to process conformance in the realization of quality goods and services; however, they can be rather document intensive…

Abstract

Purpose

Quality management standards (e.g. ISO 9001) lead to process conformance in the realization of quality goods and services; however, they can be rather document intensive. This paper investigates documentation practices used for aligning “light-weight” Scrum methods with ISO 9001 in a leading healthcare software firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigated how “light-weight” Scrum approaches fit with organizational documentation practices for ISO 9001 compliance in one leading healthcare software development firm. Three investigative rounds were conducted with software professionals having different Scrum roles to understand their challenges in maintaining process documentation with Scrum methods.

Findings

ISO standards stipulate certain mandatory documentation as evidence that certain pre-defined processes are followed in the build-up of quality goods and services. However, this may result in “heavy-weight” document driven approaches that interfere with “light-weight” Scrum methods. Case study findings reveal tensions faced by software professionals in maintaining the ISO 9001 documentation. That is, while some level of documentation is considered useful, software professionals consider certain other documentation tasks to be excessive and cumbersome. Further, many operational documents were written retrospectively for administrative compliance, leading to reduced, incomplete and ambiguous descriptions.

Practical implications

The study provides much value for practitioners in adapting their documentation with ongoing operational processes. Further, the critique on current ISO 9001 implementations in Agile environments has implications for future documentation practice.

Originality/value

The empirically drawn findings showcase some of the challenges in maintaining ISO 9001 documentation within Scrum projects. The study has contributed to both theory and practice in relation to the co-existence of ISO drawn standards with Agile approaches used for software development.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Nihal Palitha Jayamaha, Nigel Peter Grigg and Robin Stephen Mann

The purpose of this paper is to test empirically two key measurement perspectives – measurements in the context of a theoretical model that predicts/explains results, and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test empirically two key measurement perspectives – measurements in the context of a theoretical model that predicts/explains results, and measurements in the context of generating an overall score on performance excellence – of the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence (BCPE) using data from Australasian Business Excellence Award applicants.

Design/methodology/approach

Two theoretical models corresponding to each measurement perspective were tested using data (n=118) from the applicants for the New Zealand Businesses Excellence Award (based on the BCPE). The partial least squares method was used to test the validity of the measurement items of the BCPE. Qualitative data were also collected from applicants for the Australian Business Excellence Award.

Findings

Most of the measurement items showed low levels of measurement validity under both measurement perspectives; the main reason for this was considered to be due to the design of the BCPE as it is a high level of integration and alignment between the various items and categories.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a non‐probability sample, although this was unavoidable because the desire was to use data on national business excellence award applicants; such data are rarely available for research purposes.

Practical implications

The paper shows that it is important for organisations to understand the relationships between the various categories/items. Also, the paper indicates that more research should be undertaken in this area to assist organisations to understand the relationships.

Originality/value

The dual measurement perspectives of a BE model (using the same data) has not been tested before, and it is hoped that this study will help academia and the practitioner community to develop more refined performance excellence measures.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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