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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2011

Rick Brown and Emily Evans

This study examines changes to the nighttime economy of Hartlepool in the north east of England following the introduction of the Licensing Act 2003. It shows that later…

Abstract

This study examines changes to the nighttime economy of Hartlepool in the north east of England following the introduction of the Licensing Act 2003. It shows that later opening hours led to later drinking, which in turn led to later violence, criminal damage and antisocial behaviour. Over the period examined, violence against the person fell by 14% in the town centre between the hours of 8pm and 4.59am, while criminal damage fell by 15% and antisocial behaviour increased by 4%. Extending the licensing hours would appear to have contributed to a more moderate (4%) reduction in violence against the person, resulting from a reduction in violence between midnight and 1.59am (the previous closing time) and a smaller increase between 2am and 4.59am. Using the same approach, criminal damage and antisocial behaviour saw small net increases over the same period. Both licensees and partner agencies perceived that changes were detrimental to the town centre. Existing powers at the time of the research appeared to be insufficient to address these problems, which affected the whole of the nighttime economy area rather than individual premises. However, new proposals for extended early morning restriction orders would allow local authorities to revert to the opening hours in place prior to the Licensing Act 2003.

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Safer Communities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2003

Peter Jones, Andrew Charlesworth, Victoria Simms, David Hillier and Daphne Comfort

Based on information derived from a Web‐based survey of local authority reports and policies, on evening and late night economies and the way that they are managed. Sums…

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1191

Abstract

Based on information derived from a Web‐based survey of local authority reports and policies, on evening and late night economies and the way that they are managed. Sums up that both the evening and late night economies are very important features of United Kingdom town and city centres.

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Management Research News, vol. 26 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Jani Tartia

The rhythmic patterns of urban mobilities, and their fluctuations and modifications across the day, give the streets their perceived and experienced atmosphere and…

Abstract

The rhythmic patterns of urban mobilities, and their fluctuations and modifications across the day, give the streets their perceived and experienced atmosphere and character. This paper examines such street atmospheres and focusses on the role of embodied mobility rhythms in the (re)making of the atmospheres throughout the day. Utilising a rhythmanalytical framework and research data comprising videoed site observations and on-site fieldnotes, the study analyses ‘crepuscular’ (behaviour taking place during the twilight hours of the day, at dawn and dusk) mobility rhythms that reveal internal tensions and modalities of urban sites across a 24-hour period. The analysis highlights the connections between fluctuating pressures of motor traffic and mobile embodied appropriations of the space in the making of the streetscape and its changing atmospheres between the ‘day-time city’ and the ‘night-time city’. The chapter demonstrates that an analytical focus on such ‘in-between’ temporalities of the twilight can help to map the complex and multifaceted urban polyrhythmia, which, in turn, might provide new insight for rhythm-based perspectives towards urban atmospheres and street spaces as sites of urban social life.

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Rhythmanalysis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-973-1

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Terror, Leisure and Consumption: Spaces for Harm in a Post-Crash Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-526-5

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Salim Jiwa, J. Andres Coca‐Stefaniak, Martin Blackwell and Toyubur Rahman

The Light Night initiative currently under development in the UK offers an innovative approach to revitalising town and city centres by involving residents and visitors…

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1026

Abstract

Purpose

The Light Night initiative currently under development in the UK offers an innovative approach to revitalising town and city centres by involving residents and visitors through culture and the arts. This initiative is based on the successful Nuit Blanche (White Night) culture‐led urban revitalisation model tested in cities like Brussels, Madrid, Montreal, Rome, São Paulo, Skopje and Toronto, where the Nuit Blanche programme alone resulted in an estimated $4.9 million economic impact on the city and attracted 800,000 people (Toronto). This paper aims to review elements of good practice internationally in the implementation of this concept and suggest a way forward for its realisation in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study builds on the 24‐hour city concept and provides a practical example of how culture‐led urban revitalisation through the Light Night programme can be implemented in Birmingham, Leeds, Liverpool, Nottingham and Sheffield based on successful international experiences.

Findings

Evidence gathered through a review of the literature provided in this case study would suggest that community involvement through creative culture‐led urban revitalisation initiatives can be instrumental in developing sustainable places and communities. Furthermore, it may provide a pathway towards overcoming some of the negative perceptions associated with the nighttime economy in many British town and city centres. The Light Night programme provides an opportunity for key social stakeholders to implement this through its focus on shared culture, history and identity.

Originality/value

This paper reviews the evolution of the European Nuit Blanche initiative using a case study approach, and its interpretation in the UK through the Light Night programme. It further explores the economic, cultural and social benefits of Light Nights and Nuit Blanche on community cohesion, tourism and regeneration. This paper is of value to practitioners and policy‐makers in place marketing, town centre management, local authority economic development officers, business managers, urban regeneration consultants, academics, tourism officers, community leaders and town centre residents.

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Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2019

Piotr Zmyslony and Robert Pawlusiński

This paper aims to depict the evolution of the relationship between tourism and the night-time economy (NTE) from 1946 to 2095.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to depict the evolution of the relationship between tourism and the night-time economy (NTE) from 1946 to 2095.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper enables the feedback loop concept rooted in general system theory to identify positive and negative feedback loops between tourism and the NTE. The study is based on selective literature on the topic.

Findings

The paper recognises the volatility of positive and negative loops in the past and the dominance of positive feedback loops in the future. This paper also identifies the primary triggers of the feedback loops as technological, economic, environmental, political, social and market.

Research limitations/implications

Selective literature review and abstracting from the impact of other industries on the recognised feedback loops are the main limitations of the study.

Practical implications

The development of both tourism and the NTE should be considered and planned just through the prism of their feedback loops.

Originality/value

The feedback loop concept is proposed to explain the general logic of dynamics of the relationship between tourism and the NTE.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Ivett Pinke-Sziva, Melanie Smith, Gergely Olt and Zombor Berezvai

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the phenomenon of overtourism with specific reference to the night-time economy (NTE) in Budapest, Hungary.

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3039

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the phenomenon of overtourism with specific reference to the night-time economy (NTE) in Budapest, Hungary.

Design/methodology/approach

The research took place between September and December 2017 in the so-called “party quarter” of Budapest – District VII. The chosen methods included mapping, observation, interviews and questionnaires with local residents, visitors and tourists.

Findings

Partying opportunities are valued highly by tourists and the majority of customers in the bars are tourists. Many people feel that there are too many tourists in the area, although few had a bad experience with tourists. The most common complaints were the dirt and litter, public urination, street crime and noise. Most respondents would welcome a better cleaning service, more bins, more police, more public toilets and better street lighting.

Research limitations/implications

The research was not undertaken in the high season, older residents were slightly under-represented and wider research across the whole city would give a more balanced perspective.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made for managing the NTE better in order to improve the experience of tourists and visitors and to improve the local resident quality of life.

Social implications

It is hoped that this research may prompt local authorities to take local resident perceptions and experiences into account by creating better management measures and regulations.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to provide data from the perspective of three main stakeholder groups in the context of the NTE in Budapest.

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International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Andrew B. Stafford and Jonathan Hobson

There has been a widespread move in England’s city centres to a business crime reduction partnership (BCRP) model that welcomes businesses from all commercial sectors and…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been a widespread move in England’s city centres to a business crime reduction partnership (BCRP) model that welcomes businesses from all commercial sectors and that operate during day time and night time trading hours, and that seeks to tackle a broad range of crimes and associated behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to consider whether this new holistic approach offers benefits that narrower models do not.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws upon data from a multi-year examination of the Gloucester City Safe BCRP, including quantitative analysis of 4,523 offences recorded by the partnership and qualitative analysis of 149 interviews with its members.

Findings

In Gloucester there was a small minority of offenders who commit offences against more than one type of business, who offend during both the day time and night time trading hours and who commit more than one type of offence. There is value, therefore, in partnerships bringing together businesses from different commercial sectors and that operate in the day and night time economies to coordinate their efforts to tackle such activity.

Practical implications

Sharing information among partnership members via e-mail and secure web-based platforms helps raise awareness concerning offenders and the offences that they commit which in turn can be used to prevent offences from occurring.

Social implications

This inclusive holistic BCRP model can lead to an increased sense of community cohesion for its members arising from the collective effort of multiple types of businesses.

Originality/value

The authors are not aware of other studies that have considered these issues.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

Geoff Newiss and Ian Greatbatch

The purpose of this paper is to quantify the risk of fatality for men who are reported missing following a night out. Additionally, the paper aimed to develop search…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to quantify the risk of fatality for men who are reported missing following a night out. Additionally, the paper aimed to develop search heuristics to inform the development of search strategies, through an examination of the key geographical points involved in these cases.

Design/methodology/approach

Cases were identified, and data collected, from online media sources supplemented with a request to UK police forces and a search of the UK Missing Persons Unit database. In total, 96 cases which occurred over a five-and-a-half-year period in the UK were included. The study compares the profile of fatalities that result from disappearances occurring in different types of geographical area. Location data were georeferenced allowing Euclidean distances between geographical locations to be generated.

Findings

In total, 60 per cent of disappearances lasting longer than 48 h resulted in fatality, rising to almost all cases after three days missing. In 89 per cent of cases bodies are recovered from water; 11 per cent on land after the individual died from a fall, hypothermia or a drugs overdose.

Practical implications

Search strategies can be informed by a consideration of the type of area the person was socialising (high night-time economy through to rural areas) and the geography of subsequent sightings.

Originality/value

In focusing on the specific circumstances of a disappearance rather than an individual’s personal characteristics, the paper offers an innovative approach to understanding risk (i.e. what is the likelihood of a particular outcome occurring) and the development of heuristics for search strategies in missing person cases.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Adrian Barton and Kerryn Husk

The aim of this paper is to focus on the impact of alcohol pre‐loading on behaviour in the night time economy (NTE).

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1031

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to focus on the impact of alcohol pre‐loading on behaviour in the night time economy (NTE).

Design/methodology/approach

The project was commissioned by Devon and Cornwall Police. During the course of six months in late 2010/early 2011, 597 arrestees were asked a series of questions relating to their drinking patterns on the evening prior to their arrest.

Findings

The research shows that there is a shift from the traditional “pub‐club” drinking pattern to a “home‐pub‐club” pattern where excessive early evening drinking is occurring in the private sphere in the absence of external control. Moreover, pre‐loading has become a key aspect in the drinking patterns of many of the NTE population with around 50 per cent of people drinking significant quantities of alcohol prior to entering the NTE. It also demonstrates that those that pre‐load self‐report higher levels of drinking and thus higher levels of intoxication than those that do not.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are constrained by sample bias, as all informants came from the criminal justice system.

Social implications

When looking specifically at the relationship between pre‐loading and violence, the research showed that there is a relationship between high levels of self‐reported intoxication and self‐reported feelings of aggression, especially in males. This manifested in the NTE as flash points which seemed to occur at entry points to pubs and clubs. Those pre‐loaders that were arrested for violent crimes cite excessive drinking as the significant factor in their behaviour. The research concludes that pre‐loading alcohol prior to entering the NTE is a major challenge to those charged with keeping order in and around city centre pubs and clubs.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the discourse on alcohol related violence in the night time economy, and the negative consequences of pricing drinkers out of licensed premises.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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