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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Karen Williams Middleton, Antonio Padilla-Meléndez, Nigel Lockett, Carla Quesada-Pallarès and Sarah Jack

The purpose of this paper is to explores the influence of socialization upon the constitution and integration of learning leading to the development of entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explores the influence of socialization upon the constitution and integration of learning leading to the development of entrepreneurial competence while at university, from the learner perspective. Self-reported learning is analyzed to illustrate ways in which students make use of institutional and social contributions of the university context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates entrepreneurial journeys of 18 participants, either currently attending or recently graduated from three universities in three countries with both comparable and distinctive contextual elements. In depth analysis of individual life stories, focusing on self-identified critical incidents, is used to illustrate ways in which students, while at university, develop entrepreneurial competence for current and future practice.

Findings

Formal and non-formal learning remain important foundations for entrepreneurial competence development, delivered through designed content-centric structures. Informal learning – particularly mentor supported socialised learning – centring around the learner is key to solidifying learning towards entrepreneurial competence, through know-how and access to resources. The university emerges as an entrepreneurial learning space where students constitute and integrate learning gained through different forms.

Research limitations/implications

Cross-cultural analysis is limited as the paper emphasizes the individual’s learning experience relative to the immediate university context.

Practical implications

Universities play a critical role as entrepreneurial learning spaces beyond formal and non-formal learning. This includes dedicating resources to orchestrate informal learning opportunities and enabling interaction with the different agents that contribute to socialised situated learning, supporting entrepreneurial competence development. Universities need to take responsibility for facilitating the entirety of learning.

Originality/value

Socialised learning in combination with other forms of learning contributes to student development of entrepreneurial competence while situated in the university context.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 April 2020

Aurora Garrido-Moreno, Víctor García-Morales, Stephen King and Nigel Lockett

Although Social Media use has become all-pervasive, previous research has failed to explain how to use Social Media tools strategically to create business value in today's…

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1211

Abstract

Purpose

Although Social Media use has become all-pervasive, previous research has failed to explain how to use Social Media tools strategically to create business value in today's increasingly digital landscapes. Adopting a dynamic capabilities perspective, this paper empirically examines the specific process through which Social Media use translates into better performance and the capabilities involved in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model is proposed that includes both antecedents and consequences of Social Media use. Existing research was examined to derive the research hypotheses, which were tested using SEM methodology on a sample of 212 hotels.

Findings

The results show that Social Media use does not exert significant direct impact on organizational performance. Rather, the findings confirm the mediating role played by Social CRM and Customer Engagement capabilities in the value creation process.

Practical implications

The results demonstrate how Social Media tools should be implemented and managed to generate business value in hotels. Implications yield interesting insights for hotel managers

Originality/value

This study is a first attempt to analyze empirically the real impact of digital media technologies, particularly Social Media use, drawing on the dynamic capabilities perspective and focusing on service firms (hotels). Including the variable “Organizational Readiness” as a basic prerequisite to benefit from Social Media use enhances the study's novelty and contribution.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Lorraine Johnston, Sarah Robinson and Nigel Lockett

This paper aims to stimulate debate among academic and policymaking communities as to understanding the importance of social processes and open innovation contexts within…

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1910

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to stimulate debate among academic and policymaking communities as to understanding the importance of social processes and open innovation contexts within existing models of knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) between higher education institutions (HEIs) and industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was conducted through a number of case studies connected to UK HEIs and through extensive interviews with representatives of HEI, industry and policy makers over a two‐year period.

Findings

The results confirm that social processes are often under‐explored in collaborative HEI‐industry settings. The study identified seven emerging themes which are important to HEI‐industry relationships: the importance of network intermediaries; flexibility, openness and connectivity of network structures; encouraging network participation; building trust in relationships through mutual understanding; active network learning; strengthening cooperation through capacity building; and culture change.

Practical implications

This research raises implications for policymakers and practitioners engaged in developing KTE collaborative activities. The paper argues for greater attention to be placed upon the social processes that affect collaborative innovation and working. Policymaking in particular needs to take account of these processes as they are neither easy to establish nor sustain.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on HEI‐industry interactions for enhanced KTE activity and partnership working which demonstrates value to wider scholarly and practitioner readership. In the context of “open innovation”, the paper argues in favour of greater attention to be paid to the social processes involved in engaging HEI academics with industry professionals. Moreover, the paper further contributes to wider perspectives on the importance of international HEI‐industry research activities.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Ann Bicknell, Jan Francis‐Smythe and Jane Arthur

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate motivations and “pull” factors of academics engaging in knowledge transfer (KT).

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1507

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate motivations and “pull” factors of academics engaging in knowledge transfer (KT).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 15 in‐depth interviews were conducted with experienced, KT active (KTAs) academics to reveal their motivations and pull factors for engaging. Data were transcribed and submitted to template analysis to achieve qualitative conceptual “saturation”, from which a conjuctural analysis of conceptual relations was derived.

Findings

From the data, seven thematic areas were inducted: values‐in‐practice, motivations and “buzz moments”, purposive activities, the academic context, the journey of the KTA, pedagogy and perceptions of risk.

Research limitations/implications

The interview sample (12 males, three females) of active KTAs can be seen as a representative and authentic regional sample from the Midlands – who had carried out both teaching, research and KT aspects within their academic roles. In total, 120,000 words of dialogue were candidly reported, attesting to conceptual coherence.

Practical implications

The results concur with some existing literature on conceptualising the KTA as an academic intrapreneur, but also highlight aspects of how this role conceptually differs from non‐KTA academics. This has implications for the recruitment, development and retention of KTAs, in addition to facilitating their roles in higher education institutions (HEIs).

Originality/value

This paper constitutes a unique induction of a conceptual model for a relatively new economic and operational phenomenon in HEIs: the KTA. The paper contrasts with existing literature on the barriers and challenges to KTA work by emphasis on the positive and motivational aspects of the role.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Sarah Robinson

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439

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Ian Gordon and Sarah Jack

The need to develop a greater understanding about the creation of social capital and how this might impact on entrepreneurship and the development of the small‐ to…

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1804

Abstract

Purpose

The need to develop a greater understanding about the creation of social capital and how this might impact on entrepreneurship and the development of the small‐ to medium‐sized enterprise (SME) sector requires further research. This paper aims to consider to what extent engagement with higher education institutions (HEIs) by SMEs creates social capital and network benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper follows the experiences of five SME owners who participated in the Lancaster University LEAD programme (a leadership programme for owner/managers who want to develop their leadership capabilities and grow their business) between 2004 and 2006. Qualitative techniques are used to consider networking activities, use and development of social capital and experiences. A framework for data collection and analysis was developed from the literature review.

Findings

Results show that the experience of engaging with the HEI sector was beneficial. Networks provided the opportunity to create social capital and had a positive impact on the development of the SME and the individual. A number of key elements supported this process namely trust in the individuals running the programme, the creation of a supportive environment where individuals were able to share experiences and social events.

Originality/value

This paper has implications for practitioners and the designers of SME engagement programmes at HEIs. For practitioners, this paper demonstrates that by engaging with the HEI sector, entrepreneurial networks can be extended. For designers, this paper demonstrates that the creation of trust and sociability are key aspects for the success of the experience of engaging. However, this must be coupled with content that is rich in reflection.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Antonio Padilla-Meléndez, Ana Rosa Del Aguila-Obra and Nigel Lockett

Several studies have investigated the factors affecting innovation in medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) at different levels. However, research into the characteristics of…

Abstract

Purpose

Several studies have investigated the factors affecting innovation in medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) at different levels. However, research into the characteristics of the entrepreneur (individual level) in social economy enterprises (SEE), and the relationship to innovation is scarce. The purpose of this paper is to build upon previous innovation literature to analyse SEE innovativeness.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper empirically analyses data from 193 face-to-face interviews with the founder/owner/managing director of small (zero to nine employees) SEE in Andalucía, Spain. A semi-structured questionnaire was produced using the literature review. To ensure the reliability of the data collection and the consistency of the results, several researchers reviewed the codification and analysis of the answers. Quantitative analyses were performed on the data, including descriptive statistical analysis and multivariate analysis (factorial for innovativeness construct validation, multiple regression, cluster, and discriminant). The software SPSS IBM PASSW Statistics 18 was used.

Findings

Considering the individual factors, it was determined that a proactive attitude towards innovation and a degree-level education were positively related to SEE innovativeness and that these were the most significant factors considered. The identification of attitude towards innovation was perhaps not surprising; one might expect a relationship between proactiveness and innovativeness. Furthermore, this result is consistent with the positive impact exerted by entrepreneurial characteristics, such as entrepreneurial confidence and adaptability, or SME entrepreneurs’ proactive personality and prospector strategy orientation towards their firms’ innovation.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a number of limitations. First, the study is an exploratory study of innovativeness in SEE in a limited geographical area. Second, the fact that the interviews were conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire limited the opportunities for obtaining more detailed information regarding the factors affecting innovativeness in SEE. Third, other variables may have been used as control variables, such as firm age. Sector was used as control variable and it was found as not significant. Fourth, other statistical analyses, such as hierarchical linear modelling, would benefit the results, as different levels of analysis would be considered simultaneously. Fifth, other components of entrepreneurial orientation would render the results more complete.

Practical implications

The research findings suggest that SEE would benefit from degree-level people with proactive attitudes towards innovation. Clearly, attitude and education are important aspects of the individual's mindset. This study demonstrates that the mind sets of the owners of SEE, in terms of both education and attitude, positively impact innovativeness. At least in SEE, degree-level entrepreneurs with positive attitudes towards innovation run more innovative firms. The challenge for regional policy makers is to look beyond the formal education system to promote innovation skills programmes for social and economic impact.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the entrepreneurship and innovation literature by identifying the importance of developing individual-level skills as well as formal education in order to foster innovation in SEEs.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Sue Smith, Mary Rose and Ellie Hamilton

The purpose of this paper is to tell the story of the evolution of knowledge exchange (KE) activity within a department in a university in the north west of England and to…

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1012

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to tell the story of the evolution of knowledge exchange (KE) activity within a department in a university in the north west of England and to understand this activity through the lens of actor‐network theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying the sociology of translation to one qualitative interview shows how different actors were enrolled and mobilized into a KE actor‐network. The process of translation consists of four stages, problematisation, enrolment, interessement and mobilisation of allies which have been applied to the data to tell the story of the KE actor‐network. This is a cross‐disciplinary approach using a theoretical framework from sociology and applying it to a management/organizational context.

Findings

This framework brings fresh ways of looking at the importance of KE networks within universities. Although limited to one interview, the methodology allows for an in‐depth reading of the data and shows how resilient and flexible this actor‐network is to withstand and respond appropriately to shifts in policy and subsequent provisions for small‐ and medium‐sized enterprise business support.

Originality/value

Building from one case, the paper concludes that this account adds to an historical understanding of how universities become involved with KE activities. The inclusion of non‐human actors allows for a deeper understanding of the actor‐network and shows the importance of actors such as White Papers, pots of funding and physical buildings to the role of KE within higher education.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Sonny Nwankwo, Jaya Akunuri and Nnamdi O. Madichie

The purpose of this paper is to explore how narrative discourses frames entrepreneurial knowledge – in the form of understandings and meanings – focusing the role of…

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1074

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how narrative discourses frames entrepreneurial knowledge – in the form of understandings and meanings – focusing the role of business support in stimulating black entrepreneurship. It reveals the assumptions and values associated with business support from the point of view of the providers – who themselves are categorized as “black”.

Design/methodology/approach

A collaborative narrative approach is adopted to locate knowledge of business support within the “life‐world” of black business support providers. The research was conducted at two levels: focus group and narrative interviews.

Findings

The paper highlights the ways in which dominant discourses guide as well as constrain the representation of black businesses. Low take‐up of business support is contested. Public‐funded business support programmes are perceived as unwholesome, unwieldy and inherently inadequate in meeting the strategic development needs of black businesses.

Research limitations/implications

Focusing on actual engagement rather than content aspects of the business support policy framework reveals a need for more dialogic research to explore more deeply whether, and to what extent, alternative and new perspectives on supporting black businesses are needed.

Originality/value

The novelty of this paper lies in attempting to unravel the complex processes of business support provision in the context of black entrepreneurship by decoding the narrative discourses used by support providers who are themselves categorized as “black”. Such intrinsic examination of views and beliefs is relatively unique and provides an interesting platform for further research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Aurora Garrido-Moreno, Nigel Lockett and Victor Garcia-Morales

The purpose of this paper is to propose a research model exploring the link between knowledge management processes and customer relationship management (CRM) performance…

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1916

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a research model exploring the link between knowledge management processes and customer relationship management (CRM) performance. It seeks to answer two research questions: What are the effective drivers of knowledge management processes in the context of a CRM initiative? Do these processes make a real impact on CRM performance?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on data obtained from a sample of 93 service companies located in Spain. The authors conducted a structural equation modeling analysis using PLS to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

It was observed that both technological and organizational readiness were effective drivers of knowledge management. However, it was contrasted also that the usage of social media tools was not significantly related to knowledge management. Results show a real impact of knowledge management processes on CRM performance, so companies can understand how to implement successfully those initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of the study are that it was based on cross-sectional data and that variables were measured based on the perceptions of general managers.

Practical implications

Service companies need to invest in technological infrastructures, and create an appropriate organizational climate (top management support, employees commitment) in order to promote effective knowledge management processes, that will enable CRM success, paving the way for the development of marketing innovations.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical work that examines in confirmatory way what are the main drivers of knowledge management processes, including in the analysis the impact of both organizational and technological readiness, and considering also the usage of social media tools, in the context of a CRM initiative.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

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