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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Adam Palmer and Nigel Bradley

This paper explores the question of whether there is an ethical business case for SMEs employing a more diverse workforce. Regan and Stanley (2003: p. v) have argued that…

Abstract

This paper explores the question of whether there is an ethical business case for SMEs employing a more diverse workforce. Regan and Stanley (2003: p. v) have argued that employers should look beyond their legal obligations in respect of disadvantaged groups. What attitudes do SME employers have to such proposals, what are their current practices and how can they be supported to meet skills shortages through employing a more diverse workforce? The primary data has been derived from focus group sessions with local SMEs and interviews with the procurement managers of large employers in Southampton. Examples of good practice in employment policies of SMEs, methods of engagement, attitudes to diversity and business benefits are discussed in relation to the literature on inclusion strategies for disadvantaged groups in employment. The feasibility of using supply chains to encourage employment diversity in SMEs is evaluated. Looking to future research, the paper considers how research, evaluation, benchmarking and analysis might support the exchange of ideas, knowledge, information and experience between local organisations. In concluding it reflects on how Southampton's labour market intelligence capability and the capacity of local organisations to deliver effective support services to businesses and individuals could be built. Finally, the paper initiates discussion on the feasibility of addressing low economic activity and participation rates among women and disadvantaged individuals and communities, while increasing the supply of skills and entrepreneurs to expand the small business and social economies.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Nigel Bradley

809

Abstract

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1984

Things seem to be going desperately wrong with the concept of the “brave new world” predicted by the starry‐eyed optimists after the Second World War finally came to an…

Abstract

Things seem to be going desperately wrong with the concept of the “brave new world” predicted by the starry‐eyed optimists after the Second World War finally came to an end. To those who listen only to what they want to hear, see everything, not as it is, but as they would like it to be, a new society could be initiated and the lusty infant would emerge as a paragon for all the world to follow. The new society in truth never really got off the ground the biggest mistake of all was to cushion millions of people against the results of their own folly; to shelter them from the blasts of the ensuing economic climate. The sheltered ones were not necessarily the ordinary mass of people; many in fact were the victims and suffered the consequences. And now that the state has reached a massive crescendo, many are suffering profoundly. The big nationalised industries and vast services, such as the national health service, education, where losses in the case of the first are met by Government millions, requests to trim the extravagant spending is akin to sacrilege in the latter, have removed such terms as thrift, careful spending, value for money from the vocabulary.

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British Food Journal, vol. 86 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2018

Ryan Bradley and Nigel Newbutt

The use of virtual reality (VR) technologies in the education of autistic children has been a focus of research for over two decades. It is argued that this form of…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of virtual reality (VR) technologies in the education of autistic children has been a focus of research for over two decades. It is argued that this form of technology can provide authentic “real world” contexts that target social and life skills training in safe, controllable and repeatable virtual environments. The development of affordable VR head-mounted displays (HMD), such as Google cardboard and Oculus Rift, has seen a renewed interest in their use for a wide range of applications, including the education of autistic individuals. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search of electronic databases focussing on empirical studies on the use of VR-HMD for children and adults on the autism spectrum was undertaken.

Findings

A review of the literature identified a limited number of studies in this field characterised by differences in the type of application, technology used and participant characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst there are some grounds for optimism, more research is needed on the use of this technology within educational settings to ensure robust recommendations can be made on the implementation, use and sustainability of this approach.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to consider the evidence base for the use of VR-HMD technology to support the needs of the autistic population.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 March 2022

Nigel Newbutt and Ryan Bradley

The potential of head mounted displays based virtual reality (HMD-based VR) for autistic groups has been well documented. However, the deployment and application of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The potential of head mounted displays based virtual reality (HMD-based VR) for autistic groups has been well documented. However, the deployment and application of this technology, especially in schools, has been extremely limited. One of the main criticisms in this field has been the lack of involvement from practitioners in research on educational approaches for autistic populations and the gap between research and practice in real-life settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual article focuses on our research in a UK-based special needs school that sought to examine the effects and potential use of VR-HMDs, while seeking to establish best practices for safe and ethical application using this technology. This draws upon ethical and participatory research guidance, including British Educational Research Association and Autism Participatory Research.

Findings

The authors make recommendations on planning and implementing a participatory, safe and ethical approach to researching the use of VR-HMDs in special needs schools and engaging with the priorities of autistic children and young people and their teachers.

Originality/value

This conceptual article provides an initial first consideration of ways we can better include autistic people and their views in research that is with and about them. The value in this will mean we are able to better support autistic groups moving ahead using VR HMD-based technologies. Without this paradigm shift and including autistic people (and their stakeholders) the field might continue to build initiatives around medical-based models of disabilities rather that what the community need/want.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Thomas Duening, Nigel Nicholson and Jill Bradley-Geist

Recent criticisms of organizational science theory have lamented a lack of depth and a growing “maturity” that is impeding empirical advances. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent criticisms of organizational science theory have lamented a lack of depth and a growing “maturity” that is impeding empirical advances. The purpose of this paper is to propose that organizational scientists can address this problem by embracing “evolutionary awareness” (EA). EA builds on theories and constructs developed in the evolutionary sciences that serve to add depth to theory building.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of the paper is first to introduce the concept of EA and identify its four key constructs. Next, the authors apply EA to three areas of research within organizational science: human motivation, interpersonal communication and leadership. The authors’ intent is to show that EA constructs extend and deepen traditional organizational science theorizing. Thereby, the authors show that the problems noted above, i.e., lack of depth and maturing theories, can be addressed by embracing EA.

Findings

The findings are that EA substantially enhances and freshens theorizing in the organizational sciences in the areas of human motivation, communication and leadership. By extension, other areas of interest will also benefit by embracing the EA perspective.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of the research are many. Organizational scientists can advance theory building, research and practical prescriptions by embracing EA. They can also engage in interdisciplinary research programs with scholars in the evolutionary sciences eager to see their work having practical implications. The limitation of this work is that the authors were only able to show a limited application of EA to three areas of interest to organizational science scholars.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this research are potentially far reaching. At this very moment, scholars in a wide array of disciplines are re-casting their views of humanity, cognition, values and other constructs based on the acceptance of evolution and its primary mechanism, variation and selection based on consequences. These changes will usher in new ideas about leadership, work-life balance, organizational purpose and many others.

Social implications

A much-needed “consilience” across the human sciences through embracement of the EA perspective may provide insights that will advance human flourishing in organizations and beyond. The authors believe that an increasingly veridical understanding of humanity will produce substantial social impact.

Originality/value

This work will provide an encompassing perspective that will assist organizational scholars in advancing their theory building and research questions. A much-needed “consilience” across the human sciences may provide insights that will advance human flourishing in organizations and beyond.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Simon Peter Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to build upon the paucity of UK research on gay men and how they manage their identities, bodies and selves in the workplace. Particular focus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build upon the paucity of UK research on gay men and how they manage their identities, bodies and selves in the workplace. Particular focus is placed on gay male professionals working in positions of authority and how they make sense of themselves against the dominant expectations of professionalism.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws upon in-depth interview data with eight gay male professionals working in positions of authority.

Findings

Overall, the research reveals that although the majority of participants had disclosed their sexuality in the workplace, they actively sought to integrate and normalise their gay identities. Gendered organisational norms significantly impacted upon the ways they presented their identities, bodies and selves. This was brought into focus where participants had to exercise authority. There were limited opportunities to present non-normative forms of masculinity.

Originality/value

This paper adds to a dearth of studies on gay men, professionalism and managing their bodies, selves and identities in the workplace. The paper builds upon and contributes to our understanding of how gay men use and construct their bodies and their self-identities as professionals. An area that has had little empirical investigation. Furthermore, the paper contributes to our understanding of organisational heteronormativity and professionalism in the workplace. The paper draws attention to issues of diversity and inclusion challenging heteronormative discourses of professionalism which are draped in masculinity. This paper highlights how professionalism serves as a normalising process that pressurises gay men to perform a specific type of masculinity. The paper argues for a more inclusive reappraisal of the meanings attached to the term professionalism.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2022

Nigel Newbutt, Noah Glaser and Heath Palmer

Previous research provides promising insights to the role of spherical video-based virtual reality (SVVR) applied with and for autistic users. Work already conducted in…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research provides promising insights to the role of spherical video-based virtual reality (SVVR) applied with and for autistic users. Work already conducted in this area suggests that SVVR delivered via a range of head-mounted displays (HMDs) are useable, acceptable, can enable skill acquisition, can be relevant for delivering training, can help to reduce discomfort and promote skills generalization. However, to date very little research articulates methods or approaches to the design and development of SVVR. Here, the authors share the experiences of working in this space and designing SVVR content with and for autistic groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw upon two case studies/projects that were previous worked on with the intention to extrapolate key parts of the production process of SVVR development. The authors also outline key theoretical contexts as related to SVVR development in this field.

Findings

The goal of this primer on SVVR is to provide researchers and practitioners with an overview of using this technology. The authors provide a set of recommendations that should inform others in creating their own content and developing SVVR for/with/by autistic people.

Originality/value

This work combines and outlines theoretical, conceptual and practical considerations for practitioners and stakeholders seeking to build and deploy SVVR content; aspects not reported in previous research.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1980

Nigel Strickland

You will have read in last month's issue that I have taken over from Tom Coffin as Director of Administration. As you can probably imagine, it was with some trepidation…

Abstract

You will have read in last month's issue that I have taken over from Tom Coffin as Director of Administration. As you can probably imagine, it was with some trepidation that I sat down to write my first edition of ABE News. However my primary duty is quite clear; this is to thank Tom Coffin very sincerely on behalf of all members for everything that he has done for the Association during his time as Director of Administration. I know you would like to wish him a very long and happy retirement. I am sure that he won't mind my recording the fact that this is his third and, as he himself put it, hopefully his final retirement.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 22 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

In those frightening years between the two Wars and governments in France came and went with dismal frequency, it used to be said that any French Government which…

Abstract

In those frightening years between the two Wars and governments in France came and went with dismal frequency, it used to be said that any French Government which permitted food prices to rise had no chance whatever of surviving, and the result was that food was bountiful and incredibly cheap. Times have changed dramatically but not the attitude of people to the price and availibility of food and, in particular of political control; this is very much the same as always. Mostly, it revolves around the woman and what she sees as an abuse, greed and taking mean advantage of prevailing conditions and, make no mistake, this will be reflected in the political field; in the way she votes. It has happened in previous elections; it will happen in even greater degree in the next election and, although not decisive, it can have a not insignificant impact. None know better than the housewife how meaningless is the smug talk of the politicians when it comes to food prices. Their attitude may not have been the main factor in throwing out the last Conservative Government; this was undoubtedly the fear that their continuance in office would result in widespread strikes and the serious effect these upheavals have on food prices (and other household necessit ies), but the votes of woman were an unimportant contribution. As it was, it mattered little to the muscle men of the trade unions which party is in power. Women's talk around the shops and supermarket's, up and down the High Street to‐day is one long grumble and disillusionment with politicians generally.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 81 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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