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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

M.J.M.H. (Kiki) Lombarts and N.S. (Niek) Klazinga

To deepen our insight into the Dutch system of visitatie, a doctors‐led and ‐owned external peer review mechanism through site visits, a process evaluation was performed…

Abstract

To deepen our insight into the Dutch system of visitatie, a doctors‐led and ‐owned external peer review mechanism through site visits, a process evaluation was performed. The study focussed on the practice‐specific recommendations for improvement as the measurable outcome of the peer review process, the attitude of medical specialists towards visitatie, and towards the recommendations. Medical specialists’ positive attitudes towards visitatie hold promise for the implementation of the recommendations for improvement, an essential final step in the process. In order to achieve improvements tailor made implementation strategies need to be offered. Specialty societies and hospital managers could play a role in facilitating improvement.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Thomas Plochg and Niek S. Klazinga

To explore theoretically the reasons for the modest uptake of clinical governance practices by taking the literature on the origin of tensions between doctors and managers…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore theoretically the reasons for the modest uptake of clinical governance practices by taking the literature on the origin of tensions between doctors and managers as the starting‐point.

Design/methodology/approach

The approaches of doctors and managers to the division and coordination of medical work are analysed theoretically from a twofold perspective that combines insights from sociologists' theories on “professionalism” and administrative scientists' theories on “management science”.

Findings

The combined perspective theoretically explains the problems between doctors and managers that frustrate the uptake of clinical governance practices. By inference from this theoretical analysis, a twofold agenda for a constructive dialogue is proposed. Doctors and managers must develop a shared vision of the division and coordination of medical work as well as discussing the values, norms and goals underlying patient care. It is questionable, however, whether this agenda is currently adequately addressed.

Originality/value

This paper provides a theoretical underpinning for the dialogue between doctors and managers. It may be enlightening for all doctors and managers working in the field.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Asgar Aghaei Hashjin, Bahram Delgoshaei, Dionne S Kringos, Seyed Jamaladin Tabibi, Jila Manouchehri and Niek S Klazinga

– The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of applied hospital quality assurance (QA) policies in Iran.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of applied hospital quality assurance (QA) policies in Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method (quantitative data and qualitative document analysis) study was carried out between 1996 and 2010.

Findings

The QA policy cycle forms a tight monitoring system to assure hospital quality by combining mandatory and voluntary methods in Iran. The licensing, annual evaluation and grading, and regulatory inspections statutorily implemented by the government as a national package to assure and improve hospital care quality, while implementing quality management systems (QMS) was voluntary for hospitals. The government’s strong QA policy legislation role and support has been an important factor for successful QA implementation in Iran, though it may affected QA assessment independency and validity. Increased hospital evaluation independency and repositioning, updating standards, professional involvement and effectiveness studies could increase QA policy impact and maturity.

Practical implications

The study highlights the current QA policy implementation cycle in Iranian hospitals. It provides a basis for further quality strategy development in Iranian hospitals and elsewhere. It also raises attention about finding the optimal balance between different QA policies, which is topical for many countries.

Originality/value

This paper describes experiences when implementing a unique approach, combining mandatory and voluntary QA policies simultaneously in a developing country, which has invested considerably over time to improve hospital quality. The experiences with a mixed obligatory/voluntary approach and comprehensive policies in Iran may contain lessons for policy makers in developing and developed countries.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Dirk F. de Korne, Jeroen D.H. van Wijngaarden, Cathy van Dyck, U. Francis Hiddema and Niek S. Klazinga

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implementation of a broad-scale team resource management (TRM) program on safety culture in a Dutch eye hospital, detailing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implementation of a broad-scale team resource management (TRM) program on safety culture in a Dutch eye hospital, detailing the program’s content and procedures. Aviation-based TRM training is recognized as a useful approach to increase patient safety, but little is known about how it affects safety culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre- and post-assessments of the hospitals’ safety culture was based on interviews with ophthalmologists, anesthesiologists, residents, nurses, and support staff. Interim observations were made at training sessions and in daily hospital practice.

Findings

The program consisted of safety audits of processes and (team) activities, interactive classroom training sessions by aviation experts, a flight simulator session, and video recording of team activities with subsequent feedback. Medical professionals considered aviation experts inspiring role models and respected their non-hierarchical external perspective and focus on medical-technical issues. The post-assessment showed that ophthalmologists and other hospital staff had become increasingly aware of safety issues. The multidisciplinary approach promoted social (team) orientation that replaced the former functionally-oriented culture. The number of reported near-incidents greatly increased; the number of wrong-side surgeries stabilized to a minimum after an initial substantial reduction.

Research limitations/implications

The study was observational and the hospital’s variety of efforts to improve safety culture prevented us from establishing a causal relation between improvement and any one specific intervention.

Originality/value

Aviation-based TRM training can be a useful to stimulate safety culture in hospitals. Safety and quality improvements are not single treatment interventions but complex socio-technical interventions. A multidisciplinary system approach and focus on “team” instead of “profession” seems both necessary and difficult in hospital care.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Jeremy Henri Maurice Veillard, Michaela Louise Schiøtz, Ann-Lise Guisset, Adalsteinn Davidson Brown and Niek S. Klazinga

This paper's aim is to evaluate the perceived impact and the enabling factors and barriers experienced by hospital staff participating in an international hospital…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to evaluate the perceived impact and the enabling factors and barriers experienced by hospital staff participating in an international hospital performance measurement project focused on internal quality improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews involving international hospital performance measurement project coordinators, including 140 hospitals from eight European countries (Belgium, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia). Inductively analyzing the interview transcripts was carried out using the grounded theory approach.

Findings

Even when public reporting is absent, the project was perceived as having stimulated performance measurement and quality improvement initiatives in participating hospitals. Attention should be paid to leadership/ownership, context, content (project intrinsic features) and processes supporting elements.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizing the findings is limited by the study's small sample size. Possible implications for the WHO European Regional Office and for participating hospitals would be to assess hospital preparedness to participate in the PATH project, depending on context, process and structural elements; and enhance performance and practice benchmarking through suggested approaches.

Originality/value

This research gathered rich and unique material related to an international performance measurement project. It derived actionable findings.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Carolina Elisabeth de Korte, Dirk F. de Korne, Jose P. Martinez Ciriano, J. Robert Rosenthal, Kees Sol, Niek S. Klazinga and Roland A. Bal

The purpose of this paper is to study the quality indicator appropriateness and use it for international quality comparison on diabetic retinopathy (DR) patient care…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the quality indicator appropriateness and use it for international quality comparison on diabetic retinopathy (DR) patient care process in one American and one Dutch eye hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

A 17-item DR quality indicator set was composed based on a literature review and systematically applied in two hospitals. Qualitative analysis entailed document study and 12 semi-structured face-to-face interviews with ophthalmologists, managers, and board members of the two hospitals.

Findings

While the medical-clinical approach to DR treatment in both hospitals was similar, differences were found in quality of care perception and operationalization. Neither hospital systematically used outcome indicators for DR care. On the process level, the authors found larger differences. Similarities and differences were found in the structure of both hospitals. The hospitals’ particular contexts influenced the interpretation and use of quality indicators.

Practical implications

Although quality indicators and quality comparison between hospitals are increasingly used in international settings, important local differences influence their application. Context should be taken into account. Since that context is locally bound and directly linked to hospital setting, caution should be used interpreting the results of quality comparison studies.

Originality/value

International quality comparison is increasingly suggested as a useful way to improve healthcare. Little is known, however, about the appropriateness and use of quality indicators in local hospital care practices.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Johan Hellings, Ward Schrooten, Niek S. Klazinga and Arthur Vleugels

Improving hospital patient safety means an open and stimulating culture is needed. This article aims to describe a patient safety culture improvement approach in five…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving hospital patient safety means an open and stimulating culture is needed. This article aims to describe a patient safety culture improvement approach in five Belgian hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Patient safety culture was measured using a validated Belgian adaptation of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) questionnaire. Studies before (autumn 2005) and after (spring 2007) the improvement approach was implemented were completed. Using HSOPSC, safety culture was measured using 12 dimensions. Results are presented as evolving dimension scores.

Findings

Overall, 3,940 and 3,626 individuals responded respectively to the first and second surveys (overall response rate was 77 and 68 percent respectively). After an 18 to 26 month period, significant improvement was observed for the “hospital management support for patient safety” dimension – all main effects were found to be significant. Regression analysis suggests there is a significant difference between professional subgroups. In one hospital the “supervisor expectations and actions promoting safety” improved. The dimension “teamwork within hospital units” received the highest scores in both surveys. There was no improvement and sometimes declining scores in the lowest scoring dimensions: “hospital transfers and transitions”, “non‐punitive response to error”, and “staffing”.

Research limitations/implications

The five participating hospitals were not randomly selected and therefore no representative conclusions can be made for the Belgian hospital sector as a whole. Only a quantitative approach to measuring safety culture was used. Qualitative approaches, focussing on specific safety cultures in specific parts of the participating hospitals, were not used.

Practical implications

Although much needs to be done on the road towards better hospital patient safety, the study presents lessons from various perspectives. It illustrates that hospital staff are highly motivated to participate in measuring patient safety culture. Safety domains that urgently need improvement in these hospitals are identified: hospital transfers and transitions; non‐punitive response to error; and staffing. It confirms that realising progress in patient safety culture, demonstrating at the same time that it is possible to improve management support, is complex.

Originality/value

Safety is an important service quality aspect. By measuring safety culture in hospitals, with a validated questionnaire, dimensions that need improvement were revealed thereby contributing to an enhancement plan.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Dirk F. de Korne, Kees (J.C.A.) Sol, Thomas Custers, Esther van Sprundel, B. Martin van Ineveld, Hans G. Lemij and Niek S. Klazinga

The purpose of this paper is to explore in a specific hospital care process the applicability in practice of the theories of quality costing and value chains.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore in a specific hospital care process the applicability in practice of the theories of quality costing and value chains.

Design/methodology/approach

In a retrospective case study an in‐depth evaluation of the use of a quality cost model (QCM) and the applicability of Porter's care delivery value chain (CDVC) was performed in a specific care process: glaucoma care over the period 2001 to 2006 in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital in The Netherlands.

Findings

The case study shows a reduction of costs per product by increasing the number of outpatient visits and surgery combined with a higher patient satisfaction. Reduction of costs of non‐compliance by using the QCM is small, due to the absence of (external) financial incentives for both the hospital and individual physicians. For CDVC to be supportive to an integrated quality and cost management the notion “patient value” needs far more specification as mutually agreed on by the stakeholders involved and related reimbursement needs to depend on realised outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The case study just focused on one specific care process in one hospital. To determine effects in other areas of health care, it is important to study the use and applicability of the QCM and the CDVC in other care processes and settings.

Originality/value

QCM and a CDVC can be useful tools for hospital management to manage the outcomes on both quality and costs, but impact is dependent on the incentives in the context of the existing organisational and reimbursement system and asks for an agreed on operationalisation among the various stakeholders of the notion of patient value.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Daan Botje, Thomas Plochg, Niek S. Klazinga and Cordula Wagner

For accountability purposes, performance information sharing and clear divisions of responsibilities between medical specialists and executive boards are critical. The…

Abstract

Purpose

For accountability purposes, performance information sharing and clear divisions of responsibilities between medical specialists and executive boards are critical. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether these aspects of clinical governance have been taken up by executive boards and medical specialists in the Netherlands.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the information-sharing between medical specialists and executive boards in Dutch hospitals as one key aspect of clinical governance. Between November 2010 and February 2011, 67 medical staff board chairs and 40 chief executive officers completed an online questionnaire concerning information-sharing and the clinical governance practices within their respective hospitals.

Findings

Almost all respondents acknowledged the importance of information-sharing. However, the actual sharing differed per type of performance information. Policy/management information was shared more often than patient care information. Similarly, medical specialists differ in the degree of responsibility the take for specific clinical governance tasks. Almost all were involved in managing complication registries (99 per cent), while few managed hospital accreditation (55 per cent).

Research limitations/implications

With executive boards and medical specialists being increasingly dependent of a shared budget, they have an extra incentive to share information and to take up clinical governance tasks. The study showed that Dutch medical specialists are sharing many types of performance information with the executive board, but that this should be increased to comply with the codes. Thus far, few hospital managers in the study have formalised this in an information protocol, which is potentially the next step for other hospital staff to incorporate as well. Those who have an information protocol seem to be aware of the business case for quality.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to explore to what extent Dutch medical specialists share performance information with their respective executive boards and take up clinical governance tasks.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Johan Hellings, Ward Schrooten, Niek Klazinga and Arthur Vleugels

The purpose of this paper is to measure patient safety culture in five Belgian general hospitals. Safety culture plays an important role in the approach towards greater…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure patient safety culture in five Belgian general hospitals. Safety culture plays an important role in the approach towards greater patient safety in hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

The Patient Safety Culture Hospital questionnaire was distributed hospital‐wide in five general hospitals. It evaluates ten patient safety culture dimensions and two outcomes. The scores were expressed as the percentage of positive answers towards patient safety for each dimension. The survey was conducted from March through November 2005. In total, 3,940 individuals responded (overall response rate = 77 per cent), including 2,813 nurses and assistants, 462 physicians, 397 physiotherapists, laboratory and radiology assistants, social workers and 64 pharmacists and pharmacy assistants.

Findings

The dimensional positive scores were found to be low to average in all the hospitals. The lowest scores were “hospital management support for patient safety” (35 per cent), “non‐punitive response to error” (36 per cent), “hospital transfers and transitions” (36 per cent), “staffing” (38 per cent), and “teamwork across hospital units” (40 per cent). The dimension “teamwork within hospital units” generated the highest score (70 per cent). Although the same dimensions were considered problematic in the different hospitals, important variations between the five hospitals were observed.

Practical implications

A comprehensive and tailor‐made plan to improve patient safety culture in these hospitals can now be developed.

Originality/value

Results indicate that important aspects of the patient safety culture in these hospitals need improvement. This is an important challenge to all stakeholders wishing to improve patient safety.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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