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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2016

Nicolas Kachaner, Kermit King and Sam Stewart

The authors identify the practices that the companies that get the most benefit from their strategic-planning activities have in common:

8411

Abstract

Purpose

The authors identify the practices that the companies that get the most benefit from their strategic-planning activities have in common:

Design/methodology/approach

The authors describe how successful companies achieve better strategic planning: They explore strategy at distinct time horizons. They constantly reinvent and stimulate the strategic dialogue. They engage the broad organization. They invest in execution and monitoring.

Findings

By focusing a standard process on addressing new questions, the strategic dialogue will remain rich, because participants will have new analyses to consider and fundamentally different ideas to discuss; so strategists – and business leaders – have to learn the “art of questioning.””

Practical implications

A good approach is to ask the leaders of the business units to identify the most important questions that the center should be asking them in today’s turbulent competitive environments.”

Originality/value

An high-value overview of strategic planning for the novice and seasoned practitioner alike. A well-chosen extended strategy team and an always-on monthly strategy assessment process can be a powerful early-warning system.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Nicolas Kachaner and Michael S. Deimler

This paper aims to identify how leading companies are improving their strategy‐development processes to keep up with the transformations in the global competitive environment. The

2796

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify how leading companies are improving their strategy‐development processes to keep up with the transformations in the global competitive environment. The value of any reliable strategic foresight executives can wring from their planning systems can be priceless.

Design/methodology/approach

BCG recently studied the strategy‐development processes of leading companies by interviewing more than 100 executives in 20 firms.

Findings

The study found that leading firms are “stretching” their strategy process – along three mutually reinforcing dimensions: stretching time horizons, stretching their thinking, and stretching the engagement process

Practical implications

Numerous examples of innovative best practices are given, for example: turn issues upside down. Instead of asking how to grow the business, ask how to kill it. Instead of feuding over how to increase resources (a typical budgetary debate), ask how to operate with significantly fewer resources, or even without them.

Originality/value

The paper offers many practical ways to foster reliable strategic foresight, innovative thinking and enhanced strategic creativity.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Nicolas Kachaner, Zhenya Lindgardt and David Michael

The authors warn of an emerging competitive crisis. Multinationals are disrupting competitors and pioneering new price points and applications in the developed world with low‐cost

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Abstract

Purpose

The authors warn of an emerging competitive crisis. Multinationals are disrupting competitors and pioneering new price points and applications in the developed world with low‐cost offerings created for rapidly developing economies. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explains how smart low‐cost players invest in true innovation targeted at the large, low‐income segments of the population.

Findings

The paper charts a process for implementing low‐cost innovation.

Practical implications

Corporate leaders too often underestimate the power of low‐cost models to affect their business and wrongly focus their innovation on new products that are more sophisticated, and, thus, more expensive than the models they replace.

Originality/value

A low‐cost innovation might cannibalize some of your current profit, but, most likely, it will also expand your market scope in a significant way.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Nicolas Kachaner

During a recession, fixed costs can threaten a firm's survival or severely limit its options. This paper aims to show how fixed costs can be transformed into variable costs

2587

Abstract

Purpose

During a recession, fixed costs can threaten a firm's survival or severely limit its options. This paper aims to show how fixed costs can be transformed into variable costs through an innovative process known as “variabilization.”

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides examples of applying the technique within an organization (back‐end variabilization) and creating value‐added solutions for customers (front‐end variabilization).

Findings

The researchers suggest that managers approach major suppliers and ask them to consider buying back the overhead assets they have sold the firm. Then imagine negotiating contracts that require a firm only to pay for those assets as they are used or, even better, as a percentage of sales.

Originality/value

In many cases, embracing variabilization means that companies will sell their current assets back to their suppliers. By doing so, variabilization enables a firm to move from being a supplier to being a business partner.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Robert M. Randall

381

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Increasingly, leading companies are changing their strategy‐development processes to keep up with the transformations in the global competitive environment. Leading companies have learned to focus on developing great strategists – teams and individuals who are prepared to spot shifts early on, and are agile enough to do what it takes to seize or retain market leadership.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Catherine Gorrell

118

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 July 2016

Catherine Gorrell

482

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Catherine Gorrell

89

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 July 2016

Robert M. Randall

515

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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