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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Robert J. Snowden, Jordan Holt, Nicola Simkiss, Aimee Smith, Daniel Webb and Nicola S. Gray

Wales Applied Risk Research Network (WARRN) is a formulation-based technique for the assessment and management of serious risk (e.g. violence to others, suicide, etc.) for users…

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Abstract

Purpose

Wales Applied Risk Research Network (WARRN) is a formulation-based technique for the assessment and management of serious risk (e.g. violence to others, suicide, etc.) for users of mental health services. It has been gradually adopted as the risk evaluation and safety-planning technique for all seven health boards in Wales. The purpose of this paper is to examine the opinions of WARRN as used within these health boards.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was disseminated to NHS clinicians in secondary mental health services to evaluate their perceptions of the use and effectiveness of WARRN. Data from 486 clinicians were analysed with both quantitative and qualitative methods.

Findings

Results indicated that the overall impact of WARRN on secondary mental health care was very positive, with clinicians reporting increased skills in the domains of clinical risk formulation, safety-planning and communication, as well as increased confidence in their skills and abilities in these areas. Clinicians also reported that the “common-language” created by having all NHS health boards in Wales using the same risk assessment process facilitated the communication of safety-planning. Crucially, NHS staff believed that the safety of service users and of the general public had increased due to the adoption of WARRN in their health board and many believed that lives had been saved as a result.

Originality/value

WARRN is perceived to have improved clinical skills in risk assessment and safety-planning across Wales and saved lives.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2022

Nicola Evans, Deborah Edwards and Phill Chick

The purpose of this mixed methods rapid study was to identify the barriers and facilitators to implement relational and environmental risk management approaches to manage…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this mixed methods rapid study was to identify the barriers and facilitators to implement relational and environmental risk management approaches to manage suicidality in inpatient services.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve this within a short timeframe, a rapid review approach was chosen. Both research (qualitative and quantitative studies) and non-research material (policies, guidance and reports) were retrieved. The review was conducted across five databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, EMCARE, PsycINFO and CINAHL for English language citations within the last ten years (2009 –2019).

Findings

A total of 17 primary research papers and a further 73 reviews and grey literature were included. There was evidence that the removal of anti-ligature equipment, by which regular checks of the environment to identify and remove ligature points and increased levels of observation are carried out well, reduces suicide in hospital.

Research limitations/implications

There is a gap in research investigating “engagement activities” eliciting exactly what they are and determining how they might be effective. There is a need for new innovative ways for managing risk of suicide in hospitals that bring together meaningful engagement and maintaining safety.

Originality/value

Keeping people safe during an inpatient stay in a mental health service is a core function of mental health practitioners. This paper brings together what is already known about risk management and highlights areas for further investigation.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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