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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Vivien E. Schuleigh, John M. Malouff, Nicola S. Schutte and Natasha M. Loi

This study assessed the effectiveness of training leaders in behaviors that satisfy meeting attendees’ psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Three…

Abstract

This study assessed the effectiveness of training leaders in behaviors that satisfy meeting attendees’ psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Three managers who regularly lead meetings with their work- groups participated in the study. The study used a research design of multiple baselines across groups and began with baselines ranging over three to five meetings. Group leaders then received a session of behavioral skills training with a role-play component, followed by post-training assessment over three to five meetings. The final assessment occurred one month later. Leaders reported the number of recommended leader behaviors they used prior to training and at subsequent meetings. Group members anonymously completed ratings of (1) the extent of their psychological need satisfaction, (2) their satisfaction with each meeting, and (3) how productive each meeting was. Meeting leaders showed significantly more use of the recommended behaviors after training than before training. Member ratings indicated a significant increase in need satisfaction, satisfaction with meetings, and meeting productivity after the training of their leader. Significant positive effects remained at a one-month follow-up. The findings show that training leaders in needs-focused behaviors to use in running meetings can be used to satisfy attendee-needs and to improve meeting satisfaction and productivity.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Vivien E. Schuleigh, John M. Malouff, Nicola S. Schutte and Natasha M. Loi

This research examined the effects of meeting leader behavior on organizational meetings. Two studies investigated whether leader behavior that satisfies the psychological needs…

Abstract

This research examined the effects of meeting leader behavior on organizational meetings. Two studies investigated whether leader behavior that satisfies the psychological needs of meeting attendees, leads to higher levels of meeting productivity and satisfaction. Study 1 used correlational methods, with regression- based mediation analysis, to assess whether satisfaction of attendee needs mediated the association between leader behavior and attendee ratings of actual meetings in a sample of 110 employees. Study 2 involved an analogue experiment with 158 employees to test the effects of leader behavior on ratings of hypothetical meeting scenarios. The studies provide correlational and experimental evidence for the positive impact of needs-focused behaviors, offering organizational leaders practical solutions for improving meetings.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Sally Kernbach and Nicola S. Schutte

This study seeks to examine whether higher emotional intelligence displayed by service providers leads to greater customer satisfaction.

10303

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine whether higher emotional intelligence displayed by service providers leads to greater customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A community sample of 150 participants viewed video clips depicting a service provider displaying three different levels of emotional intelligence in high or low service difficulty transactions.

Findings

Higher emotional intelligence displayed by the service provider led to greater reported satisfaction with the service transaction. Further, there was an interaction between emotional intelligence of the service provider and transaction difficulty. In the low transaction difficulty condition there was progressively more satisfaction at each higher level of emotional intelligence of the service provider. In the high transaction difficulty condition, there was low satisfaction in the low service provider emotional intelligence condition, but no significant difference in satisfaction between the high and medium levels of service provider emotional intelligence.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the research is that the study's experimental design sacrificed some external generalizability in order to maintain internal validity and obtain more definite information regarding the causal effects of service provider emotional intelligence on customer satisfaction. Future research might examine the replicability of the present results in a field study of actual service encounters.

Originality/value

The findings of the present study lend support to theoretically‐based claims of the importance of service provider emotional intelligence in determining customer satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Susan Fitzgerald and Nicola S. Schutte

The present study aims to examine whether an intervention designed to increase self‐efficacy for transformational leadership results in more transformational leadership…

10790

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to examine whether an intervention designed to increase self‐efficacy for transformational leadership results in more transformational leadership self‐efficacy and a higher level of transformational leadership. In previous research higher levels of emotional intelligence have been found to be associated with more transformational leadership; thus the present study also seeks to examine whether higher emotional intelligence makes individuals more receptive to self‐efficacy‐based leadership training.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used an experimental design. Participants were randomly assigned to either a self‐efficacy expressive writing condition or a control writing condition. Participants were 118 managers who completed measures of self‐efficacy, transformational leadership and emotional intelligence at the start of the study and again completed measures of self‐efficacy, and transformational leadership after the intervention.

Findings

Managers in the intervention condition showed significantly greater transformational leadership self‐efficacy and higher transformational leadership scores than the control group managers at post‐test. Further, those higher in emotional intelligence were more responsive to the intervention.

Practical implications

The intervention holds promise as a low cost and easy to implement method of facilitating development of transformational leadership.

Originality/value

The finding that an intervention aimed at increasing self‐efficacy can increase transformational leadership extends previous research on both self‐efficacy and transformational leadership. This result suggests that leadership self‐efficacy may be an important component of transformational leadership. The finding that individuals higher in emotional intelligence benefited most from the intervention extends previous findings regarding the importance of emotional intelligence in organisational settings. Emotional intelligence may facilitate individuals' openness to change.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

761

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Natasha Loi, Carey Golledge and Nicola Schutte

To improve understanding of uncivil workplace behaviour, the present study sought to examine the relationships between emotional intelligence, positive affect, negative affect and…

1060

Abstract

Purpose

To improve understanding of uncivil workplace behaviour, the present study sought to examine the relationships between emotional intelligence, positive affect, negative affect and perpetration of uncivil behaviour in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Email, workplace networks and social media were used to recruit 113 managers who completed an anonymous online self-report survey of measures relating to emotional intelligence, positive and negative affect and engaging in uncivil workplace behaviour.

Findings

Results showed that greater emotional intelligence was significantly associated with higher positive affect and less negative affect as well as less likelihood of engaging in uncivil behaviour. Higher levels of negative affect were associated with engaging in uncivil behaviour. Analyses indicated that the relationship between lower emotional intelligence and engaging in uncivil workplace behaviour was mediated by negative affect only. The findings support the importance of emotional intelligence and affect in workplace functioning and shed light on possible precursors of the destructive behaviours that comprise workplace incivility.

Originality/value

These findings contribute insight into uncivil workplace behaviour and provide a foundation for examining the contribution of all stakeholders including victims and perpetrators as well as implications for management and organisational practices.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Beverley Kirk, Nicola Schutte and Donald Hine

The links between emotional self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, positive and negative affect, workplace incivility (from the target and perpetrator perspective), and job…

Abstract

The links between emotional self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, positive and negative affect, workplace incivility (from the target and perpetrator perspective), and job satisfaction were explored in a model of workplace functioning. Two hundred and seven adults participated in the study. As expected, emotional self-efficacy significantly predicted trait or dispositional emotional intelligence, which in turn was a significant predictor of participants' negative and positive affect. The relationship between low emotional intelligence and high negative affect was especially strong. Also as expected, individuals with higher levels of negative affect were more likely to be perpetrators of workplace incivility than individuals with lower levels of negative affect. Individuals who engaged in higher levels of incivility perpetration were more likely to be victims of incivility than individuals who never or rarely engaged in uncivil behavior. Being a victim of incivility was associated with higher levels of negative affect and lower levels of job satisfaction. Counter to the original predictions, positive affect was unrelated to either incivility perpetration or victimization.

Details

Emotions in Groups, Organizations and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-655-3

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2023

Antoine Millet, Audrey Abi Akle and Jérémy Legardeur

Regarding industrial sports products, there is sometimes a dual sport and health meaning intended by designers. Appearances of sport products are often quite opposite to health…

Abstract

Purpose

Regarding industrial sports products, there is sometimes a dual sport and health meaning intended by designers. Appearances of sport products are often quite opposite to health products. Design choices made by designers can thus be misunderstood by users. This paper aims to deeper understand the perception gap between designers and users within earlier stages of the design process to limit this confusion and help designers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose an approach to help designers defining the perception of a new dual and hybrid product field. The first step is to collect designers’ perception through interviews combined with card sorting. The second step is to compare the perception of designers with that of users. Comparisons are based on an agreement measure.

Findings

The approach provides a first step to evaluate the perception of a dual hybrid product field. It allows designers to extract trends and perceptions to be considered for the design of products, to consolidate and confirm their intuitions regarding the intended dual meaning.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to evaluate the perception of a new and non-defined hybrid product field presenting a duality in appearance. This approach can be used by designers either to identify trends to be considered, reinforce the intended meaning, or validate their intuitions while designing products with dual meanings before.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Innovative to the Core: Stories from China and the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-084-7

Abstract

Details

Innovative to the Core: Stories from China and the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-084-7

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