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1 – 10 of 11
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Okechukwu Nwadigo, Nicola Naismith Naismith, Ali Ghaffarianhoseini, Amirhosein Ghaffarian Hoseini and John Tookey

A construction project is complex and requires dynamic modelling of a range of factors that deters time performance because of uncertainty and varying operating…

Abstract

Purpose

A construction project is complex and requires dynamic modelling of a range of factors that deters time performance because of uncertainty and varying operating conditions. In construction project systems, the system components are the interconnected stages, which are time-dependent. Within the project stages are the activities which are the subsystems of the system components, causing a challenge to the analysis of the complex system. The relationship of construction project time management (CTM) with the construction project time influencing factors (CTFs) and the adaptability of the time-varying system is a key part of project effectiveness. This study explores the relationship between CTM and CTF, including the potentials to add dynamical changes on every project stage.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposed a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) model to examine the relationship between CTM and CTF. The model investigates the time performance of a construction project that enhances decision-making. First, the paper establishes a model of probabilistic reasoning and directed acrylic graph (DAG). Second, the study tests the dynamic impact (IM) of CTM-CTF on the project stages over a specific time, including the adaptability of time performance during disruptive CTF events. In demonstrating the effectiveness of the model, the authors selected one-organisation-single-location road-improvement project as the case study. Next, the confirmation of the model internal validity relied on conditional probabilities and the project knowledge experts' selected from the case company.

Findings

The study produced structural dependencies of CTM and CTF with probability observations at each stage. A predictive time performance analysis of the model at different scenarios evaluates the adaptability of CTM during CTF uncertain events. The case demonstration of the model application shows that CTFs have effects on CTM strategy, creating the observations to help time performance restorations after disruptions.

Research limitations/implications

Although the case company experts' panel confirms the internal validity of the results for managing time, the model used conditional probability table (CPT) and project state values from a project contract. A project-wide application then will require multi-case data and data-mining process for generating the CPTs.

Practical implications

The study developed a method for evaluating both quantitative and qualitative relationships between CTM and CTF, besides the knowledge to enhance CTM practice and research. In construction, the project team can use model observations to implement time performance restorations after a predictive or reactive disruption, which enhances decision-making.

Originality/value

The model used qualitative and qualitative data of a complex system to generate results, bounded by a range of probability distributions for CTM-CTF interconnections during time performance disruptions and restorations. The research explores the approach that can complement the mental CTM-CTF modeling of the project team. The CTM-CTF relationship model developed in this research is fundamental knowledge for future research, besides the valuable insight into CTF influence on CTM.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Dat Tien Doan, Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Nicola Naismith, Amirhosein GhaffarianHoseini, Tongrui Zhang and John Tookey

Green building information modelling (BIM) has been highlighted as an essential topic owing to its potential benefits. However, both Green Star and BIM are still in their…

Abstract

Purpose

Green building information modelling (BIM) has been highlighted as an essential topic owing to its potential benefits. However, both Green Star and BIM are still in their earlier stages in New Zealand. This paper aims to examine and evaluate the benefits, barriers/challenges and solutions for the integration of Green Star and BIM in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a total of 77 responses collected from construction professionals in New Zealand using questionnaires were analysed through descriptive and statistical tests.

Findings

Building performance modelling used for Green Star assessment can be implemented using BIM; this was highlighted as the most significant benefit of the integration. Whereas, the most significant barrier preventing the integration of Green Star and BIM was the fact they are two completely separate processes. Regarding the solutions for the integration, showcasing BIM-Green Star benchmark projects was considered as the most effective solution amongst a range of eight provided.

Originality/value

The research provided insights into Green Star–BIM integration in New Zealand. By evaluating the significance of the benefits, barriers/challenges and solutions for the integration, this research could be used as a guideline for Green Star and BIM development by New Zealand Green Building Council (NZGBC), the Government and construction practitioners in New Zealand. Specifically, the results here could be valuable inputs for Green Star manuals and the New Zealand BIM handbook.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 August 2021

Megan Burfoot, Amirhosein Ghaffarianhoseini, Nicola Naismith and Ali Ghaffarianhoseini

Informed by acoustic design standards, the built environments are designed with single reverberation times (RTs), a trade-off between long and short RTs needed for…

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Abstract

Purpose

Informed by acoustic design standards, the built environments are designed with single reverberation times (RTs), a trade-off between long and short RTs needed for different space functions. A range of RTs should be achievable in spaces to optimise the acoustic comfort in different aural situations. This paper proclaims a novel concept: Intelligent passive room acoustic technology (IPRAT), which achieves real-time room acoustic optimisation through the integration of passive variable acoustic technology (PVAT) and acoustic scene classification (ASC). ASC can intelligently identify changing aural situations, and PVAT can physically vary the RT.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative best-evidence synthesis method is used to review the available literature on PVAT and ASC.

Findings

First, it is highlighted that dynamic spaces should be designed with varying RTs. The review then exposes a gap of intelligently adjusting RT according to changing building function. A solution is found: IPRAT, which integrates PVAT and ASC to uniquely fill this literature gap.

Originality/value

The development, functionality, benefits and challenges of IPRAT offer a holistic understanding of the state-of-the-art IPRAT, and a use case example is provided. Going forward, it is concluded that IPRAT can be prototyped and its impact on acoustic comfort can be quantified.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Okechukwu Bruno-Kizito Nwadigo, Nicola Naismith, Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Amirhosein GhaffarianHoseini and John Tookey

Dynamic planning and scheduling forms a widely adopted smart strategy for solving real-world problems in diverse business systems. This paper uses deductive content…

Abstract

Purpose

Dynamic planning and scheduling forms a widely adopted smart strategy for solving real-world problems in diverse business systems. This paper uses deductive content analysis to explore secondary data from previous studies in dynamic planning and scheduling to draw conclusions on its current status, forward action and research needs in construction management.

Design/methodology/approach

We searched academic databases using planning and scheduling keywords without a periodic setting. This research collected secondary data from the database to draw an objective comparison of categories and conclusions about how the data relates to planning and scheduling to avoid the subjective responses from questionnaires and interviews. Then, applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, we selected one hundred and four articles. Finally, the study used a seven-step deductive content analysis to develop the categorisation matrix and sub-themes for describing the dynamic planning and scheduling categories. We used deductive analysis because of the secondary data and categories comparison. Using the event types represented in a quadrant mapping, we delve into where, when, application and benefits of the classes.

Findings

The content analysis showed that all the accounts and descriptions of dynamic planning and scheduling are identifiable in an extensive research database. The content analysis reveals the need for multi-hybrid (4D BIM-Agent based-discrete event-discrete rate-system dynamics) simulation modelling and optimisation method for proffering solutions to scheduling and planning problems, its current status, tools and obstacles.

Originality/value

This research reveals the deductive content analysis talent in construction research. It also draws direction, focuses and raises a question on dynamic planning and scheduling research concerning the five-integrated model, an opportunity for their integration, models combined attributes and insight into its solution viability in construction.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Dat Tien Doan, Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Nicola Naismith, Amirhosein Ghaffarianhoseini, Tongrui Zhang and John Tookey

This research aims to explore the perspectives of the key actors in the New Zealand construction industry towards BIM adoption. Specifically, four themes are examined…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore the perspectives of the key actors in the New Zealand construction industry towards BIM adoption. Specifically, four themes are examined, including what BIM is; BIM knowledge and understanding; benefits of BIM adoption; and challenges/barriers to BIM adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach using 21 semi-structured interviews with industry experts was adopted.

Findings

The results raise a question concerning whether the New Zealand construction industry needs a unique definition of BIM to achieve a clear and consistent understanding amongst construction practitioners. It was found out that most of the construction practitioners in New Zealand are not well aware of BIM, especially the contractors, QSs, supply chain companies and the SMEs. Fourteen potential benefits and ten barriers/challenges to BIM adoption were identified. Individually, time-saving was considered as the most benefit of BIM adoption while BIM understanding was suggested as the most significant barrier by all the interviewees.

Originality/value

The research provides valuable insights into BIM understanding as well as recommendations regarding BIM adoption in New Zealand. The results could be considered baseline information for the companies and government to have effective strategies towards BIM adoption. Furthermore, it confirms that characteristics such as benefits and barriers to BIM adoption amongst different countries could be similar. Therefore, it could be useful to analyse the studies, strategies and practices of the pioneer countries in BIM adoption for the implementation.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Ali GhaffarianHoseini, John Tookey, Amirhosein GhaffarianHoseini, Nicola Naismith and James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi

The purpose of this paper is to review extant literature and to provide perspectives on approaches to enhancing built environment sustainability in Africa. There is a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review extant literature and to provide perspectives on approaches to enhancing built environment sustainability in Africa. There is a mismatch between global societal resources and the increasing demand for natural resources. The consequences of this mismatch are prevalent in many African countries, causing the need to implement of built environment sustainability as a matter of cause.

Design/methodology/approach

Little research has been undertaken to date with a focus on the environmental sustainability of Africa. With this in mind the review was undertaken through a series of incremental steps. It began with an initial review, before developing through exploratory and development phases. The process culminated with the refined literature review presented.

Findings

The paper finds that a different approach is required to achieve built sustainable development for developed and developing countries, with a clear difference in terms of its application observed between the Northern and Southern hemispheres. Current energy and water crisis facing Africa is brought to the fore and an evaluation is provided of the systems being used to ameliorate its effects. The study explores a range of technological solutions that are appropriate for consideration in the African context. It also examines the barriers that need to be overcome to facilitate the widespread use of the suggested solutions in Africa.

Originality/value

This study examines built environment sustainability through the Africa lens. It highlights its importance and the contextual factors inhibiting the widespread uptake of built environment sustainability solutions. The study offers a number of recommendations for the future to encourage long-term built environment sustainability in Africa and more specifically the Sub-Saharan region.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Dat Tien Doan, Nicola Naismith, John Tookey and Amirhosein GhaffarianHoseini

Green Star is becoming a broadly accepted mark of design quality and environmental sustainability. Compared to other green tools, Green Star is considered as one of main…

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Abstract

Purpose

Green Star is becoming a broadly accepted mark of design quality and environmental sustainability. Compared to other green tools, Green Star is considered as one of main streams green assessment tools, which cover almost sustainable criteria. Simultaneously, building information modelling (BIM) has also been introduced into the industry. BIM is expected to aid designers to shift the construction industry towards more environmentally and economically sustainable construction practice. Whilst the aspirations of Green Star rating and BIM implementation are broadly aligned, in the context of New Zealand this has led to some disconnects in design strategy and process. The purpose of this paper is to improve the practicality of BIM implementations for delivering Green Star certification in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

The extensive literature review is conducted through a series of incremental steps. A conceptual framework focussing on the relationship between benefits and challenges of BIM and Green Star is then developed.

Findings

BIM supports practitioners to achieve the majority of Green Star criteria (75 per cent). Energy efficiency criterion is the key factor affecting the assessment process of Green Star and National Australian Built Environment Rating System in New Zealand. Research questions about lessening the challenges which can be encountered during the BIM and Green Star implementation are developed.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to a conceptual research. Further empirical research should be conducted to validate and modify the conceptual framework and the propositions presented in this paper to provide an initial insight into BIM and Green Star connectivity within the context of New Zealand.

Originality/value

This paper provided a clear picture for investors, developers, practitioners about benefits and challenges of BIM and Green Star implementation. The outcomes are anticipated to deliver visions for shifting the country further towards development of sustainable future cities.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Kay Greasley, Alan Bryman, Andrew Dainty, Andrew Price, Nicola Naismith and Robby Soetanto

The purpose of this article is to examine the various meanings of empowerment for employees from their own perspective, the psychological dimension of empowerment and…

9948

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the various meanings of empowerment for employees from their own perspective, the psychological dimension of empowerment and whether employees want to be empowered.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to understand how employees feel about empowerment, it is necessary to ask them directly so that one can understand their perceptions. A qualitative approach is adopted, employing 45 semi‐structured, in‐depth interviews with employees. The aim of the interviews is to provide an insight into the meanings of empowerment for these employees.

Findings

The findings indicate that the employees do not recognise the term “empowerment” nor do they reference the term “power” in relation to themselves. However, they are able to relate to associated concepts, notably “personal responsibility” and “control over their work”. Empowerment for the employees was found to operate as a continuum, as the extent to which employees seek empowerment varies considerably. The innate feelings that employees have with regard to empowerment enable an insightful understanding of what empowerment means and the employee response to it.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on employees from one particular industrial sector. The research would benefit from exploration in alternative sectors.

Originality/value

The study examines the various meanings of empowerment for employees from their own perspective. Furthermore, it explores whether employees want to be empowered.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Fiona Lettice and Martin McCracken

647

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2022

Philip Tong and Hans-Christian Wilhelm

Sloping topographies in urban areas are often under-utilised due to complex designs and difficult access, resulting in low construction productivity and high cost…

Abstract

Purpose

Sloping topographies in urban areas are often under-utilised due to complex designs and difficult access, resulting in low construction productivity and high cost. Automated construction techniques are usually limited to flat sites or lab spaces. This research combines concepts for automated and prefabricated construction with hillside dwelling design. It proposes a strategy to integrate both aspects and to equally inform design process and design output. The aims are to turn hillside access and construction automation into design generators, improve productivity and use more affordable hillside sites.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of typologies for hillside housing and automated construction techniques is used to derive principles and parameters to inform a strategy and generative script for setting out, volumetric disposition and access and using the topography as a design-generator. The output from the generative script and tool can then form the basis of a high-density, low-rise dwelling development suited for serial, automation-assisted construction. The strategy is tested on a case study site.

Findings

The typological analysis helps devising strategies for integrating construction robotics and design criteria for hillside housing. The generative script illustrates how a strategy is implemented and used in a design tool able to absorb varying input data, including topographies. This generates innovative, site-specific design outcomes, suited for a process that adapts contemporary construction automation techniques and allows for more efficient use of hillside sites.

Originality/value

This research builds on construction automation methods and proposes novel combinations and adaptations for use on hillside sites. It demonstrates how robotics and generative tools can inform early design stages.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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