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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2021

Emily Samuels and Nicola Moran

Physical health inequalities and mortality rates are higher amongst individuals with severe mental illness (SMI), including among forensic populations, than the general…

Abstract

Purpose

Physical health inequalities and mortality rates are higher amongst individuals with severe mental illness (SMI), including among forensic populations, than the general population. This paper aims to explore the experiences of individuals accessing primary health care following discharge from secure services, and the practitioners who support them.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face qualitative interviews were conducted with service users (n = 4) and mental health practitioners (n = 4) within a forensic community mental health team in one NHS Trust in England in 2019. Data were analysed using the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.

Findings

Four super-ordinate themes emerged: perceived importance of physical health, agency, responsibility and relationships. Service users mostly saw themselves as passive recipients of health care and prioritised their mental health over their physical health. Close working relationships meant that mental health practitioners were often the first contact for service users with any health issue and thus felt a sense of responsibility for their physical health care. Service users who did access primary care reported that consistency of professional, feeling understood and listened to without judgement or stigma were important.

Practical implications

Interventions for service users that include practicalities and strategies to facilitate independence in physical health care, and collaborative working between primary care and forensic mental health services, are encouraged.

Originality/value

This study highlights some of the unique challenges in forensics around improving physical health outcomes for individuals with SMI.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Kuldip Kaur Kang and Nicola Moran

This paper aims to explore inpatient staff experiences of seeking to meet the religious and cultural needs of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) inpatients on mental…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore inpatient staff experiences of seeking to meet the religious and cultural needs of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) inpatients on mental health wards.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine semi-structured interviews were undertaken with inpatient staff in one NHS Trust in England to explore their views and experiences of supporting BAME inpatients to meet their religious and cultural needs. Anonymised transcripts were analysed thematically.

Findings

Inpatient staff reported lacking the confidence and knowledge to identify and meet BAME inpatients’ religious and cultural needs, especially inpatients from smaller ethnic groups and newly emerging communities. There was no specific assessment used to identify religious and cultural needs and not all inpatient staff received training on meeting these needs. Concerns were raised about difficulties for staff in differentiating whether unusual beliefs and practices were expressions of religiosity or delusions. Staff identified the potential role of inpatients’ family members in identifying and meeting needs, explaining religious and cultural beliefs and practices, and psychoeducation to encourage treatment or medication adherence.

Practical implications

Potential ways to address this gap in the knowledge and confidence of inpatient staff to meet the religious and cultural needs of BAME patients include training for inpatient staff; the production and updating of a directory of common religious and cultural practices and needs; local resources which can help to support those needs; and religious and cultural practices and needs being documented by mental health practitioners in community teams such that this information is readily available for inpatient staff if a service user is admitted.

Originality/value

This is the first study to consider inpatient staff views on meeting the religious and cultural needs of BAME informal patients and patients detained under the Mental Health Act 1983.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2011

Susan Clarke, Patricia Sloper, Nicola Moran, Linda Cusworth, Anita Franklin and Jennifer Beecham

Drawing on a wider study about the effectiveness and costs of different models of multi‐agency transition services, this paper aims to present new evidence on the ways in…

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on a wider study about the effectiveness and costs of different models of multi‐agency transition services, this paper aims to present new evidence on the ways in which such services meet the priorities and concerns of young people identified in previous research.

Design/methodology/approach

The evidence is based on qualitative interviews with 130 managers and staff in five transition services across England, and a quantitative survey of parents and young people receiving these services (pre‐transition), or having received the services in the last‐two years (post‐transition). In total, 110 pre‐transition and 33 post‐transition parents, and 73 pre‐transition and 24 post‐transition young people, completed questionnaires. Statistical analysis included calculating frequencies and mean values for the responses that measured met and unmet need, and qualitative results were analysed thematically. The consequence of, and reasons for, the low response rate to the family survey are also discussed.

Findings

The research found examples of good practice and innovative services to meet young people's needs. However, provision of such services was patchy, and unmet need for transition support remained high in all the priority areas studied both during and after transition: ranging from 52 to 84 per cent in parent reports and 59 to 82 per cent in young people's reports.

Originality/value

With the onset of public service cutbacks, the paper concludes that improved multi‐agency commissioning of services, based on the priorities and concerns of disabled young people, and greater engagement of transition services with a broader range of agencies, will help to address these deficiencies.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Ann James

This paper considers cash for care as reflected in direct payments and the more recent development of individual budgets in England. While the momentum to roll out…

Abstract

This paper considers cash for care as reflected in direct payments and the more recent development of individual budgets in England. While the momentum to roll out individual budgets gathers pace in England, Wales has embarked on a more cautious approach in wishing to evaluate the impact of individual budgets on social services. The paper identifies some of the far reaching implications of cash for care in general and individual budgets in particular, for service users, carers ‐ both paid and informal ‐ and for the social work profession. The policy incoherence in relation to risk and safeguarding is highlighted. This paper supports the approach currently adopted by the Welsh Assembly Government in relation to the ‘rolling out’ of individual budgets. The Assembly's 10‐year strategy for social services focuses on the rights of citizens and the needs of communities. This paper argues that fulfilling that vision should not be wholly contingent upon an unproven extension into the field of individual budgets.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Melanie Henwood and Bob Hudson

As the social care system ‐ and potentially the health care system and other public services ‐ move increasingly towards a model of personalised support, questions arise…

Abstract

As the social care system ‐ and potentially the health care system and other public services ‐ move increasingly towards a model of personalised support, questions arise about whether and how it can work for people with multiple and complex needs. The evidence is that it is possible to achieve this, and that the outcomes and quality of life can be dramatically improved, but many councils and their partners have yet to move into this demanding activity, and face considerable obstacles in the form of conventional approaches to policy and practice if and when they do. This article draws on the findings of a special study undertaken for the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Alongside some of the difficulties of personalising support for people with multiple and complex needs are inspirational stories of innovative developments which have transformed the lives of people and their carers.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of a 15-week dietary intake of cactus flour on metabolic parameters, body weight and dietary intake of rats.

Design/methodology/approach

Male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 8-10): control or westernized diets added or not of cactus flour. The following parameters were evaluated during the period of dietary manipulation: body weight, food intake, glycemic and lipid profile (oral glucose tolerance test, metabolic parameters, hepatic and muscular glycogen dosage), visceral and body fat (relative weight to body weight). Data were analyzed using Graphpad Prism®5, p = 0.05.

Findings

Animals fed on a Western-style diet together with flour cactus presented lower weight gain (335.7 ± 20.0, p = 0.05) over the evaluated period, even when the volume of food intake was not different among the groups. The addition of cactus flour to a Western-style diet appears to lower glucose levels at 30 and 60 min (p = 0.05), as shown in the glucose tolerance curve. There was a downward trend does fat stores, cholesterol levels and triglycerides. Therefore, it was concluded that this addition cactus flour is effective even when the diet is hyperlipidic, demonstrating its ability to attenuate risk parameters for the occurrence of metabolic syndromes such as sub fraction high cholesterol levels and glucose tolerance.

Originality/value

The addition of functional foods to diets may work to improve the harmful effects of this type of diet. Opuntia ficus indica has high nutritional value and has hypoglycemic and hypolipemic properties besides being antioxidant.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Matteo Mura, Emanuele Lettieri, Giovanni Radaelli and Nicola Spiller

The purpose of this paper is to provide arguments and empirical evidence that different knowledge sharing behaviours – i.e. sharing best practices, sharing mistakes…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide arguments and empirical evidence that different knowledge sharing behaviours – i.e. sharing best practices, sharing mistakes, seeking feedbacks – are promoted and enabled by different types of knowledge assets, and differently affect employees’ innovative work behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The research framework includes four sets of constructs: employees’ innovative work behaviour, knowledge sharing, knowledge assets, psychological safety. The literature-grounded hypotheses were tested collecting data from healthcare professionals from three hospice and palliative care organisations in Italy. In all, 195 questionnaires were analysed using structural equations modelling technique.

Findings

First, findings show that the linkage between knowledge assets and knowledge sharing is both direct and indirect with psychological safety as relevant mediating construct. The linkage between relational and structural social capital and seeking feedbacks and sharing mistakes is fully mediated by psychological safety. Second, findings show that each dimension of knowledge sharing affects the different dimensions of employees’ innovative work behaviour – i.e. idea generation, idea promotion, idea implementation – in a distinct manner. While sharing of best practices influences all of them, seeking feedbacks affects idea promotion and sharing mistakes influences idea implementation.

Practical implications

The results provide operations managers with a clearer picture of how to pursue improvements of current operations by leveraging on knowledge sharing among employees through the creation of numerous, high-quality interpersonal relationships among employees, based on rich and cohesive network ties.

Originality/value

This study, by adopting a micro-level perspective, offers an original perspective on how knowledge assets and knowledge sharing initiatives may contribute to the engagement of innovative work behaviour by employees.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Damian Tago, Henrik Andersson and Nicolas Treich

This study contributes to the understanding of the health effects of pesticides exposure and of how pesticides have been and should be regulated.

Abstract

Purpose

This study contributes to the understanding of the health effects of pesticides exposure and of how pesticides have been and should be regulated.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents literature reviews for the period 2000–2013 on (i) the health effects of pesticides and on (ii) preference valuation of health risks related to pesticides, as well as a discussion of the role of benefit-cost analysis applied to pesticide regulatory measures.

Findings

This study indicates that the health literature has focused on individuals with direct exposure to pesticides, i.e. farmers, while the literature on preference valuation has focused on those with indirect exposure, i.e. consumers. The discussion highlights the need to clarify the rationale for regulating pesticides, the role of risk perceptions in benefit-cost analysis, and the importance of inter-disciplinary research in this area.

Originality/value

This study relates findings of different disciplines (health, economics, public policy) regarding pesticides, and identifies gaps for future research.

Details

Preference Measurement in Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-029-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Hind Djeghloud and Hocine Benalla

The paper aims to explain the investigation of the space vector modulation (SVPWM), in shunt active powers filters (APFs) field, for controlling the generated current.

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1374

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explain the investigation of the space vector modulation (SVPWM), in shunt active powers filters (APFs) field, for controlling the generated current.

Design/methodology/approach

With the inclusion of the SVPWM control technique, the proposed topology of the two‐level shunt active power filter (APF), based on IGBTs, besides its efficiency in harmonics cancellation and power factor correction, contributes in switching power losses reduction.

Findings

The paper provides an extended theoretical study and a detailed explanation of the application of the SVPWM on shunt APFs, and demonstrates how power losses can be reduced by limiting the switching process to the two thirds of the pulse duty cycle.

Research limitations/implications

Simulation and experimental validations will still be requested as to the accuracy of the model and the applicability to the polluted electrical power systems plants.

Practical implications

The paper formulates an easy mathematical method to investigate the SVPWM algorithm with clarification of its various steps. It offers a benefit to people engaged in theoretical and practical research in APFs, inverters, and PWM modulation strategies.

Originality/value

Since, there are few studies which clarify the application of the SVPWM on APFs, the paper may help to understand the mathematical implementation of this control strategy both for controlling the APF current and for gating signals generation.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Sarah Atayero, Kate Dunton, Sasha Mattock, Amanda Gore, Sarah Douglas, Patrick Leman and Patricia Zunszain

Interdisciplinary approaches to health education are becoming increasingly common. Here, the authors describe an arts-based approach designed by academics and artists to…

Abstract

Purpose

Interdisciplinary approaches to health education are becoming increasingly common. Here, the authors describe an arts-based approach designed by academics and artists to both supplement the study of mental illness and support the individual mental health of undergraduate and postgraduate university students, by raising the visibility of mental illness in an innovative way.

Design/methodology/approach

Through workshops, university students were guided in a sensory and physical way to discuss psychological health and vulnerability. This was followed by the creation of physical representations of mental distress through art pieces.

Findings

Students were able to design their own art pieces and discuss mental health issues in an open and creative way. Students reported that the arts-based initiative was beneficial to their practice as future professionals and provided a holistic learning experience. At the same time, artists were able to generate powerful images which facilitated further discussions within the faculty.

Practical implications

This project provides an innovative model for workshops which could be employed to raise the visibility of common mental health disorders among university students while providing a safe space to discuss and support wellbeing. Additionally, variations could be implemented to enhance the teaching of affective disorders within a university curriculum.

Originality/value

This paper presents the results of collaboration between academics and artists, who together generated an innovative way to both support students' mental health and provide an alternative way to supplement experiential learning about common mental health conditions such as anxiety and depression.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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