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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Andy Luse and Brian Mennecke

This article revisits Nicolas Carr's popular Harvard Review article IT Doesn't Matter on its ten-year anniversary. The purpose is to analyze Carr's argument by analyzing…

Abstract

Purpose

This article revisits Nicolas Carr's popular Harvard Review article IT Doesn't Matter on its ten-year anniversary. The purpose is to analyze Carr's argument by analyzing the development of the argument itself as opposed to finding exceptions to the argument, which has been done in the past.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use co-evolutionary theory as a case against Carr's argument by showing that Carr has only looked at the growth of IT from a population ecology perspective and has failed to anticipate the adaptive nature of IT within the organization.

Findings

The authors show that Carr's new rules for IT management may not be applicable if viewed through the lens of the three principles of self-renewing organizations espoused by co-evolutionary theory.

Research limitations/implications

The authors provide a new basis for evaluating the strategic nature of IT and offer a background for future research and case studies into evaluating IT strategic competitive advantage within the organization.

Practical implications

The research provides guidelines for organizations to better decide how to strategically implement IT to more fully utilize its capabilities.

Originality/value

The paper provides a new method for refuting a popular article by attacking the argument as opposed to finding exceptions to the argument. This is valuable to those who wish to evangelize the strategic capacity of IT within the organization.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Nicola Carr and Kym Fraser

International figures on university expenditure on the development of next generation learning spaces (NGLS) are not readily available but anecdote suggests that simply…

Abstract

International figures on university expenditure on the development of next generation learning spaces (NGLS) are not readily available but anecdote suggests that simply retrofitting an existing classroom as an NGLS conservatively costs $AUD200,000, while developing new buildings often cost in the region of 100 million dollars and over the last five years, many universities in Australia, Europe and North America have developed new buildings. Despite this considerable investment, it appears that the full potential of these spaces is not being realised.

While researchers argue that a more student centred learning approach to teaching has inspired the design of next generation learning spaces (Tom, Voss, & Scheetz, 2008) and that changed spaces change practice (Joint Information Systems Committee, 2009) when ‘confronted’ with a next generation learning spaces for the first time, anecdotes suggest that many academics resort to teaching as they have always taught and as they were taught. This chapter highlights factors that influence teaching practices, showing that they are to be found in the external, organisational and personal domains.

We argue that in order to fully realise significant improvements in student outcomes through the sector’s investment in next generation learning spaces, universities need to provide holistic and systematic support across three domains – the external, the organisational and the personal domains, by changing policies, systems, procedures and localised practices to better facilitate changes in teaching practices that maximise the potential of next generation learning spaces.

Details

The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Digital Detox: The Politics of Disconnecting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-342-5

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Abstract

Details

The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Abstract

Details

The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2018

Fergus McNeill

Abstract

Details

Pervasive Punishment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-466-4

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2018

Fergus McNeill

Abstract

Details

Pervasive Punishment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-466-4

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2015

Michael Rush

This paper sets a case study of missing children in the Republic of Ireland against a review of international research to explore broader understandings and responses to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets a case study of missing children in the Republic of Ireland against a review of international research to explore broader understandings and responses to the problem.

Methodology/approach

The study begins by reviewing the literature on pioneering American initiatives dating back to the 1970s and more recent literature from Great Britain where a series of high-profile scandals involving sexual exploitation of teenage girls provoked a number of controversial inquiries into the police and social work professions. The present study was prompted by an evaluation of the 116 000 Missing Children Hotline which was introduced to Ireland in 2012 under the auspices of the European Union (EU) Daphne III Programme by the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (ISPCC).

Findings

The central conclusion emerging from analysis of the evidence is that Missing Children Hotlines remain rooted in representations of ‘stranger danger’ and disconnected from repeat runaway children who feature prominently in police reports from formal care settings or family homes and who are actively targeted by sexual predators and criminal gangs. The implications are that systemic change requires grounding in research strategies which combine police data with anthropological studies to give legitimacy to the voices of runway and sexually exploited children.

Originality/value

The study offers original international perspectives on missing children to epistemological research communities in the fields of social work, criminology and policing with recommendations that Missing Children and Runaway Safe-lines are targeted systemically at keeping runaway children, homeless children and at-risk-youth safe and off the streets.

Details

Violence and Crime in the Family: Patterns, Causes, and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-262-7

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2019

Nicola J. Beatson, David A.G. Berg, Jeffrey K. Smith and Christine Smith-Han

The purpose of this paper is to test the impact of a rule that affects tertiary students progressing from an introductory level finance course to intermediate level. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the impact of a rule that affects tertiary students progressing from an introductory level finance course to intermediate level. The rule restricted students from progressing until they achieved a higher grade than just a “pass” mark.

Design/methodology/approach

Archival data were gathered from 11 semesters regarding student performance pre and post the rule being introduced.

Findings

Results show that the rule was associated with an increase in the chances of success at intermediate level for those students enrolled after the rule was introduced.

Practical implications

This paper’s main contribution regards the evidence that increasing prior learning at an introductory level has a positive follow-on effect for students learning at intermediate level. This has a practical implication for educators, as the rule has shown to increase the chance of success for knowledge development in the first year of studies.

Originality/value

The setting for this paper is unique and could potentially be replicated elsewhere. In 1980, Schaffer and Calkins called for an evaluation of the pre-requisites necessary for finance education at the tertiary level, and this paper answer this call stating that pre-requisites can contribute to the academic success of finance students.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Padraig Cotter, Nicola Jhumat, Eshia Garcha, Eirini Papasileka, Jennifer Parker, Ishmael Mupfupi and Ian Currie

This paper aims to outline the process of supporting frontline inpatient mental health staff in developing ways of coping with COVID-19.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the process of supporting frontline inpatient mental health staff in developing ways of coping with COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

A whole system approach was used in formulating and developing support structures with particular focus on relationship-focused coping.

Findings

Interventions were developed to support staff in coping with problem-focused (e.g. systemic changes) and emotion-focused challenges (e.g. deaths of colleagues). These included psychoeducation, mindfulness-based meditation and rituals to mark the deaths of colleagues. Staff SPACE (Stopping to Process and Consider Events) sessions were used to support staff in managing the many emotions they were experiencing. Positive psychology-based interventions were used to keep morale up and help people to stay motivated. The process of seeking feedback and making changes was introduced to support staff in feeling heard and having a voice. The maternal or master intervention within each of the above was the relational component.

Practical implications

This work aimed to boost the emotional and psychological literacy of the system. This will be important in the aftermath of the pandemic and could have many benefits thereafter.

Social implications

The post-COVID-19 health-care workforce will experience significant challenges in terms of readjustment and recovery. It is important that appropriate measures are put in place to ameliorate this.

Originality/value

An innovative systemic formulation of the impact of COVID-19 on frontline staff, and a coordinated way of dealing with this, is outlined.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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