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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Nico Mouton

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how organizational orators cope with situations where they must simultaneously address several audiences with clashing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how organizational orators cope with situations where they must simultaneously address several audiences with clashing interests, conflicting identities and contradictory interpretations of crucial issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on both the classical rhetorical tradition and various contemporary disciplines to delineate, conceptualize and critically discuss a repertoire of rhetorical strategies for dealing with composite audiences.

Findings

There are at least nine distinct strategies for dealing with the problem. Most of them make problematic assumptions about audiences. The most promising strategy involves shifting and blending frames.

Practical implications

Most managers will stand in situations where they have to cope with multiple and mutually antagonistic audiences. This paper provides practical suggestions for how to go about it.

Originality/value

The paper isolates and investigates a problem that was largely overlooked by classical rhetoricians, and contemporary scholars still underestimate its ubiquity, its complexity and its urgency. Apart from improving our grasp of the problem, the paper provides a comprehensive overview of potential solutions, and shows their shortcomings.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Sine Nørholm Just and Nico Mouton

The meaning of scandals like “Liborgate” is not given beforehand; it is constructed in the course of framing contests. The purpose of this paper is to provide a nuanced…

Abstract

Purpose

The meaning of scandals like “Liborgate” is not given beforehand; it is constructed in the course of framing contests. The purpose of this paper is to provide a nuanced framework for understanding such framing contests by re-conceptualizing them as rhetorical struggles.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework that combines modern framing theory, and classical stasis theory is applied to the rhetorical struggles over the meaning of “Liborgate.”

Findings

While rhetorical struggles over “Liborgate” overtly center on the issue of who is to blame, an analysis of the argumentative relations between competing frames leads to the conclusion that this political “blame game” is related to struggles over how to define the scandal, how to conceptualize its causes, and policy recommendations. Banks may have lost the battle of “Liborgate,” but the war over the meaning of financial culture is far from over.

Originality/value

The paper is theoretically and methodologically original in its combination of the theories of framing and stasis, and it provides analytical insights into how sense is made of financial culture in the wake of the financial crisis.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Nico Mouton, Sine Nørholm Just and Jonas Gabrielsen

The purpose of this paper is to re‐conceptualize the relations between rhetorical strategies and material practices in the processes whereby leaders create or change…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re‐conceptualize the relations between rhetorical strategies and material practices in the processes whereby leaders create or change organizational cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors compare and contrast two broad perspectives on cultural change in organizations. The first perspective is informed by modern social science, and focuses primarily on material practices. The second perspective is rooted in classical rhetoric, and concentrates on discursive strategies.

Findings

It is found that both perspectives hold pertinent but partial insights. The authors propose an integrated perspective in which material practices and rhetorical strategies are seen as two analytical sides of the same ontological coin. This enables a fuller and more detailed explanation of how organizational cultures are created or changed. A brief illustration is provided of the merits of this approach by revisiting the case of Enron.

Originality/value

The paper constitutes an initial exploration of how social scientific and rhetorical perspectives on organizational change may be brought closer together. It may provide the first step towards the development of a new, integrated theory.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Slawek Magala and Marja Flory

The purpose of this paper is to introduce this special issue on the subject of the rhetoric and narratives in management research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce this special issue on the subject of the rhetoric and narratives in management research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews selected contributions to the 4th Conference on Rhetoric and Narratives in Management Research held on March 24‐26, 2011 at the ESADE campus in Barcelona.

Findings

The paper reveals various views of rhetoric and narratives in management research including plagiarism, individual (personal) narratives , material and spiritual narratives and deception in storytelling.

Originality/value

The paper provides a useful introduction to the various papers on rhetoric and narratives in management research.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Eduard Bonet

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Dwight R. Merunka and Robert A. Peterson

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Book part
Publication date: 15 August 2004

Ellen Martins, Nico Martins and Fransie Terblanche

In some organizations action is taken to stimulate creativity and innovation. The right steps may have been taken, such as involving employees in decision making…

Abstract

In some organizations action is taken to stimulate creativity and innovation. The right steps may have been taken, such as involving employees in decision making, recruiting and appointing employees who evidence characteristics of creativity, setting standards for work performance and giving regular feedback, yet creativity and innovation are hampered in some way. The culture of an organization may be a factor contributing to the extent to which creativity and innovation occur in an organization (Johnson, 1996; Judge et al., 1997; Pienaar, 1994; Shaughnessy, 1988; Tesluk et al., 1997; Tushman & O’Reilly, 1997 in Martins & Terblanche, 2003). The current organizational culture and the demands of creativity and innovation may lead to a conflict situation.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-284-9

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Abstract

Details

Politics and the Life Sciences: The State of the Discipline
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-108-4

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

André Thomsen, Kees van der Flier and Nico Nieboer

In previous research publications the authors combined the available knowledge about obsolescence in a conceptual model for further research on and appliance in the…

Abstract

Purpose

In previous research publications the authors combined the available knowledge about obsolescence in a conceptual model for further research on and appliance in the decision making about demolition. Since evidence-based theoretical research references on obsolescence are rare, the model inevitably had an explorative character. The purpose of this paper is to test and elaborate the model.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of case studies were conducted in various residential building estates. In each estate the types of obsolescence (according to the model) and their interrelationships were identified.

Findings

The model can usefully be applied; it enables the determination of types of obsolescence. The case studies also show that several types of obsolescence occur simultaneously, and that these types can be interrelated. This touches upon the complexity of cause-effect mechanisms as already mentioned in the introduction. One of the weaknesses is that information is sometimes available for only one point in time, and that the availability of information varies with the type of obsolescence.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a limited selection of case studies. Further, the causal relationships between the types of obsolescence could not always be revealed.

Practical implications

The current model does not distinguish between causes and effects. For further development of the model, cause-effect processes have to be further analysed.

Social implications

Actual measurement of the extent of obsolescence per type is not part of this study, but has to be carried out before social implications can adequately be indicated.

Originality/value

The paper presents a conceptual classification of obsolescence that turns out to be workable when tested in practice.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

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