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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2022

Nicky Lidbetter, Nic Seccombe, Ember Girling Rogers and Tina Lee

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, implementation, delivery and evolution of a community-led, comprehensive, peer support service, including…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, implementation, delivery and evolution of a community-led, comprehensive, peer support service, including co-production approaches, peer support worker role development, outcomes, acceptability and lessons learnt over a five-year timeframe.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study presents a reflection on a charity’s peer support service development along with outcomes to highlight client progress.

Findings

Improvement in well-being as measured through the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) was evidenced along with demonstrating that the peer support service offers complementary support to Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services.

Research limitations/implications

There was limited quantitative data, and that which existed was analysed on a service-wide basis as opposed to looking at individual components of the service.

Practical implications

This paper demonstrates the value of peer support provision as part of an overall primary care, community-based mental health service, including findings that suggest that for some individuals, where IAPT services did not help them as much, a peer-based service appeared to be more suitable.

Social implications

The peer support service provided a complementary and alternative service to conventional primary care mental health services whilst offering individuals with lived experience to gain volunteering, employment and development opportunities.

Originality/value

Whilst peer support services have been well documented in the literature for clients experiencing serious mental illness, research on the use of such approaches in the management of common mental health difficulties including anxiety and depression is not as well established. The aim of this paper is to detail the experiences of a user-led charity in developing and delivering peer support services, including challenges encountered. Furthermore, this paper describes a peer support service that has been integrated with a co-existing low intensity IAPT service, reporting recovery rates for clients that have accessed both peer support and IAPT services.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Nicky Lidbetter and Dawn Bunnell

Self Help Services is a pioneering charity in how it champions personal experience of mental health and uses these experiences in the treatment of people living with…

Abstract

Purpose

Self Help Services is a pioneering charity in how it champions personal experience of mental health and uses these experiences in the treatment of people living with common mental health problems – anxiety, depression, phobias, and low self‐esteem issues. This paper aims to describe how the charity grew from one individual's journey with agoraphobia to being the main provider of primary care mental health services in the North West of England.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper charts the growth of Self Help Services over time, with a particular focus on its employment of people with personal mental health problems. It describes the experiences of its founder and Chief Officer and includes case studies of a user of its e‐therapy services and the charity's Informatics and Governance Lead.

Findings

The case studies illustrate how the charity has grown in both size and success as a result of harnessing the skills and experience of large numbers of staff and volunteers living with a mental health problem. The case studies illustrate that, rather than being an issue, these personal experiences are vital tools in helping others work through their own difficulties.

Originality/value

The paper provides a detailed overview of a charity which was unique when it was formed and now thrives as a result of its uniqueness. It provides other similar organisations with advice on lessons learnt along the way, and advice for individuals or groups looking to establish similar organisations.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Kate Cavanagh, Nick Seccombe, Nicky Lidbetter and Dawn Bunnell

Around the UK, a number of strategies are being employed to expand the availability and increase the accessibility of psychological treatments for anxiety and depression…

Abstract

Purpose

Around the UK, a number of strategies are being employed to expand the availability and increase the accessibility of psychological treatments for anxiety and depression. Recommended interventions include supported self‐help programs based on CBT principles such as computerised cognitive behavioural therapies (CCBT) for mild‐to‐moderate depression, phobia, and panic. This paper seeks to describe innovative third sector, service‐user led CCBT clinics commissioned within Greater Manchester.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes how the project was initially set up, how the services are managed, how they work, and the impact of these services on the population they serve.

Findings

The CCBT clinic achieves a high throughput of service‐users, including more than one‐third accessing the service through self‐referral. Intake and outcome measures suggest that CCBT service users are representative of both the local population and those accessing increasing access to psychological therapies (IAPT) services for common mental health problems. For those engaging with the CCBT service, outcomes are equivalent to those reported in NHS‐based demonstration IAPT services. Service users highly value the service offered including the computer‐based programs and the support offered by paid and voluntary staff.

Practical implications

Roll out of this effective service model is recommended.

Originality/value

This paper has described a successful third‐sector, user‐led, CCBT self‐help clinic offering a Tier‐2 service for anxiety and depression that meets local needs. This will be of interest to service users, providers, and commissioners who want to develop similar services.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Sarah Elison, Jonathan Ward, Glyn Davies, Nicky Lidbetter, Daniel Hulme and Mike Dagley

In recent years there has been a proliferation of computer-based psychotherapeutic interventions for common mental health difficulties. Building on this, a small number of…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years there has been a proliferation of computer-based psychotherapeutic interventions for common mental health difficulties. Building on this, a small number of such interventions have now been developed to address substance dependence, one of which is Breaking Free Online (BFO). A new “eTherapy” self-help service, which was set up by the UK mental health charity Self-Help Services, has provided access to BFO to service users presenting with comorbid mental health and substance misuse difficulties. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a range of clinical outcomes in the first cohort of service users accessing this dual diagnosis service.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of standardised psychometric assessments were conducted with service users at baseline and post-treatment at discharge from the service. Outcome data were available for 47 service users out of an original cohort of 74.

Findings

Statistically significant improvements were found in terms of measures of social functioning, depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug use and social anxiety. Clinically relevant gains were also identified, with fewer service users reaching threshold scores for depression and anxiety at post-treatment compared to baseline. Effect sizes also indicated that the identified improvements across the psychometric measures were robust and significant.

Research limitations/implications

These findings provide further support for the clinical effectiveness of BFO, and also provide evidence that an eTherapy self-help service may be appropriate for some individuals presenting with dual diagnosis. Further research is underway with larger and alternative clinical populations to examine the effectiveness of BFO and also this novel eTherapy self-help approach.

Originality/value

This paper has provided initial data to support effectiveness of a novel eTherapy service for dual diagnosis.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Adam Pozner

188

Abstract

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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