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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Nick Ridley

Croatia, always harbouring ambitions of becoming an independent nationstate, was caught off guard during the early stages of the events of the break‐up of Yugoslavia in…

Abstract

Croatia, always harbouring ambitions of becoming an independent nationstate, was caught off guard during the early stages of the events of the break‐up of Yugoslavia in 1990–91 by a combination of Slovenian and pan‐Serbian planning. The Slovenian planning was single‐minded for secession, while the Serbian factor was the ruthlessness of pan‐Serbian elements in both the JNA and the federal government, which manipulated the military campaigns from using limited intervention to preserve the Yugoslav federation to armed conflict in order to enable greater Serbia to gain as much territory as possible. Croatian independence was eventually gained through a combination of survivalist struggle, improvisation, the evocative — and symbolic — holding actions of the sieges of Dubrovnik and Vukovar, European Union recognition of independence, and a certain low‐key tacit rapprochement between Belgrade and Zagreb. The undoubted achievements both of gaining independence and of economic development in the following years, however, have been accompanied by economic criminality. It is this latter legacy that has created the long‐term problems that currently face the new regime in Zagreb.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Nick Ridley

By the early 1980s, primarily due to the extremely adverse foreign trade balance, Hungary was forced to join the international economy, a step which itself led to economic…

Abstract

By the early 1980s, primarily due to the extremely adverse foreign trade balance, Hungary was forced to join the international economy, a step which itself led to economic reforms. One question that presents itself is how, despite this adverse foreign trade balance, the domestic economy managed to survive and prosper through the 1970s. This question is not merely posed for historical value. For within the answer lie important long‐term vulnerability factors that gave rise to organised criminality. Such an answer in turn explains, to a certain extent, the reasons for the continuity of economic crime within Hungary from the 1970s to the present day.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Nick Ridley

Bulgaria, at the height of what history judges, with the benefit of hindsight, as the cold war, was one of the most loyal of the Warsaw Pact nations. Yugoslavia's schism…

Abstract

Bulgaria, at the height of what history judges, with the benefit of hindsight, as the cold war, was one of the most loyal of the Warsaw Pact nations. Yugoslavia's schism with the Soviet Union and her formation of the non‐aligned bloc, the Hungarian uprising of 1956, the Prague Spring of 1968 — all these left Bulgaria comparatively unmoved in her unshakeable loyalty.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Nick Ridley

This paper seeks to provide an insight into financial crime in Italy and the highlighting of the anomalous role and position of the governor of the Italian National Bank…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an insight into financial crime in Italy and the highlighting of the anomalous role and position of the governor of the Italian National Bank and the need for reform.

Design/methodology/approach

Research from contemporaneous open and other sources during a comparatively intense period mid to late 2005 regarding Italian financial institutions and international banking operations.

Findings

The ground‐breaking co‐ordinated conventions and regulatory framework of international banking operations on an EU‐wide basis was frustrated in Italy by the questionable conduct of the governor of the Italian National Bank. In this he was aided and abetted by the arguably excessive powers of that office. This conduct was interacting with and linked to, several cross‐currents of ongoing alleged financial crime in Italy.

Originality/value

This gives an insight into financial crime in Italy and the highlighting of the anomalous role and position of the governor of the Italian National Bank and the necessity for reform.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Nicholas Gilmour and Nick Ridley

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the specific techniques through which illicit funds generated by criminals are moved, transferred and laundered…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the specific techniques through which illicit funds generated by criminals are moved, transferred and laundered in the financial arrangement retained by cash-intensive businesses in the UK and internationally.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents exploratory findings from research conducted between 2011 and 2013 in the UK. The research undertaken sought to identify the process, steps and vulnerabilities behind money laundering via cash-intensive businesses and highlight the explicit facilitators to enable this method of money laundering to take place.

Findings

Despite significant research into money laundering typologies, the use of cash couriers and cash-intensive businesses has remained largely untouched regardless of the increased implementation of anti-money laundering (AML) policies and procedures seeking to halt the depositing of illicit cash into the global financial system. This paper demonstrates how cash-intensive businesses are extremely vulnerable to money laundering, despite the large-scale AML efforts focused on combating money laundering across a broad range of sectors.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is of value to government policymakers, regulators and financial institutions considering future preventative measures. It is also of value to financial investigators and law enforcement agencies intent on investigating money laundering. While the paper relies on data from the UK, the overall findings are such that wherever cash-intensive businesses exist, so too does the opportunity for money laundering through the financial arrangement retained by such businesses.

Originality/value

This paper presents new research on the direct link existing between cash-intensive businesses and money laundering in the UK, despite significant research having previously taken place to identify and develop money laundering typologies.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Corporate Fraud Exposed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-418-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1989

Shirley Day, Edwin Fleming and Allan Bunch

Your series by David F. Cheshire is most interesting and worthwhile. I am specially grateful for the kind and constructive remarks he has made over the months about…

Abstract

Your series by David F. Cheshire is most interesting and worthwhile. I am specially grateful for the kind and constructive remarks he has made over the months about exhibitions in the Barbican Art Gallery, which is part of my department in the City of London.

Details

New Library World, vol. 90 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

Shirley Day, Edwin Fleming and Allan Bunch

The National Centre for Information Media and Technology (CIMTECH) is developing a full text database of optical disc trade literature and journal articles. The database…

Abstract

The National Centre for Information Media and Technology (CIMTECH) is developing a full text database of optical disc trade literature and journal articles. The database will be held on a WORM (write once, read many) disc and it will be used to investigate the economic, technical and administrative issues associated with the application of writable discs in library and information sciences. There will be opportunities to see demonstrations of the system throughout the course of the project. Contact: Tony Hendley, CIMTECH, Hatfield Polytechnic, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (Tel. 07072 79691).

Details

New Library World, vol. 90 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Nicholas Ridley

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the banking systems in Western, and Central and Southeastern Europe, focusing on the interactive factors of anti‐money laundering…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the banking systems in Western, and Central and Southeastern Europe, focusing on the interactive factors of anti‐money laundering, transitional economies and the underground illicit economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a comparative analysis of the banking systems in Western, and Central and Southeastern Europe.

Findings

The transition economies of central and Southeastern Europe face, and have been confronted for over a generation by, the interlinked problems of the transition stage post‐1989, the alternative or illegal economy, and the vulnerability of banking systems to money laundering. In contrast, by the 1990s, Western European central banks have become established as an essential government organ in macro‐economic policies.

Originality/value

Suggests an interesting lesson that might be gained from the experiences of central and Southeastern Europe and anti‐money laundering since the late‐1990s, where a national bank or central bank has not been essential, indeed has been comparatively unimportant, compared to the developed banking system led by the individual banks.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Steven Horwitz

This chapter is the editor’s introduction to Austrian Economics: The Next Generation, which includes a brief description of the workshop that produced the papers and short…

Abstract

This chapter is the editor’s introduction to Austrian Economics: The Next Generation, which includes a brief description of the workshop that produced the papers and short summaries of each contribution organized by sub-topic.

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