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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2017

Peter Hines, Daniel Jones and Nick Rich

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Handbook of Logistics and Supply-Chain Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-8572-4563-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Peter Hines, Nick Rich, John Bicheno, David Brunt, David Taylor, Chris Butterworth and James Sullivan

Value Stream Management is a new strategic and operational approach to the data capture, analysis, planning and implementation of effective change within the core…

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6610

Abstract

Value Stream Management is a new strategic and operational approach to the data capture, analysis, planning and implementation of effective change within the core cross‐functional or cross‐company processes required to achieve a truly lean enterprise. This paper describes the method in detail including a summary of the previous Value Stream Mapping approach and its weaknesses. The new approach involves a strategic review of a business or supply chain's activities, the delimitation of key processes and the mapping of these processes. A description of how to analyze and synthesize these data is followed by a section on an approach to planning strategic and operational change together with a framework in which to do this. The benefits and limitations of the new approach are summarized.

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The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2019

Mathew Todres and James Reveley

Arguably, how psychohistorians treat entrepreneur life-writing interiorizes the autobiographer’s self, thereby limiting the extent to which self can be accessed by…

Abstract

Purpose

Arguably, how psychohistorians treat entrepreneur life-writing interiorizes the autobiographer’s self, thereby limiting the extent to which self can be accessed by researchers. By advocating a different approach, based on socio-narratology, this paper provides insight into how entrepreneurs in both the distant and recent past construct narrative identities – the textual corollary of “storied selves” – within their autobiographies.

Design/methodology/approach

The object of analysis is the failed entrepreneur autobiography, straddling two sub-genres – “projective” and “confessional” – which both serve to rehabilitate the author.

Findings

Narratological analysis of Nick Leeson’s Rogue Trader autobiography reveals how the author deftly draws upon the culturally recognizable trope of the “rogue as trickster” and “rogue as critic” to contextualize his deceptive and illegal activities, before signaling his desire for rehabilitation by exiting banking and futures trading – thereby enacting the “rogue as family man”.

Practical implications

The application of a narratological methodology opens up new avenues for understanding the interplay between Western cultural institutions, entrepreneur selves, and autobiographical writing.

Originality/value

This paper shows that narratology provides a new methodological window through which management historians can view entrepreneur autobiographies.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Peter Hines and Nick Rich

The development of sustainable competitive advantage has long been the “holy grail” of western management. Evidence presented in this paper shows that at least one of the…

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7705

Abstract

The development of sustainable competitive advantage has long been the “holy grail” of western management. Evidence presented in this paper shows that at least one of the world’s leading companies has sought to achieve advantage by leverage of knowledge and skill within its complete supply chain. The company is Toyota of Japan. A description of the benefits involved and the story of how effective “outsourcing” of competitive advantage occurred is told in full. In addition the lessons from the supplier integration process and the use of kyoryoku kai are crystallised into a working model of how this approach may be emulated in the west. What is affectively a four stage supplier association model is discussed in detail together with an illustration of each approach within a UK context. The paper seeks to provide the reader with a complete picture of how supplier associations developed and how they might be used to create and “outsource” significant competitive advantage for complete supplier networks elsewhere.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Niall Piercy and Nick Rich

The adoption of lean operational practices and independently the uptake of business practices related to sustainability and corporate social responsibility continues to…

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11544

Abstract

Purpose

The adoption of lean operational practices and independently the uptake of business practices related to sustainability and corporate social responsibility continues to grow. Past research has hinted at relationships between these two areas – suggesting that “lean is green” (e.g. Florida, 1996). The lean mantra of waste reduction and “doing more with less” is immediately apparent as delivering environmental benefits and has formed the basis of past research (e.g. Hughes, 2012). Almost all research linking lean operations or lean supply chains to sustainability issues have focused exclusively on environmental impact. The purpose of this paper is to explore the broader sustainability benefits of lean operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a longitudinal multi-year (up to four years observation), multi-case analysis (n=5).

Findings

The paper reports that lean operations meet a wide range of sustainability outcomes beyond environmental benefits (including supply monitoring, transparency, workforce treatment, and community engagement). The paper specifies the internal and external policies, procedures, tools, and strategies for implementation of lean and sustainable operations management (OM). This is encapsulated in the development of a stage-based theoretical model of lean-sustainability. Further, it is proposed that lean implementation and sustainability performance are in fact interlinked.

Originality/value

Past research on the role of lean operations in improving sustainably has focused almost exclusively on environmental benefits accruing from toolkit/workplace level waste reduction. This paper demonstrates that lean provides more than a toolkit (a philosophy and strategic direction) and that this meets a wide range of sustainable outcomes. This finding makes major contributions to conceptualising how lean operations influence sustainability outcomes. The paper develops the first integrative stage-based model of lean and sustainable OM.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Peter Hines, Nick Rich and Ann Esain

This paper describes the application of a new variant of process benchmarking called value stream mapping to the development of a supplier network around a prominent…

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8593

Abstract

This paper describes the application of a new variant of process benchmarking called value stream mapping to the development of a supplier network around a prominent distributor of electronic, electrical and mechanical components. This involved mapping the activities of the firm, identifying opportunities for improvement and then undertaking with the firm an improvement programme. The resulting supplier association programme involved around 50 key suppliers across eight product category areas. The paper explores the different methods employed together with the support structure that was created. It concludes with evidence of the early results of the programmes as well as a number of key learning points for other organisations wishing to follow a similar path.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Peter Hines, Matthias Holweg and Nick Rich

The application of lean thinking has made a significant impact both in academic and industrial circles over the last decade. Fostered by a rapid spread into many other…

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56001

Abstract

The application of lean thinking has made a significant impact both in academic and industrial circles over the last decade. Fostered by a rapid spread into many other industry sectors beyond the automotive industry, there has been a significant development and “localisation” of the lean concept. Despite successful “lean” applications in a range of settings however, the lean approach has been criticised on many accounts, such as the lack of human integration or its limited applicability outside high‐volume repetitive manufacturing environments. The resulting lack of definition has led to confusion and fuzzy boundaries with other management concepts. Summarising the lean evolution, this paper comments on approaches that have sought to address some of the earlier gaps in lean thinking. Linking the evolution of lean thinking to the contingency and learning organisation schools of thought, the objective of this paper is to provide a framework for understanding the evolution of lean not only as a concept, but also its implementation within an organisation, and point out areas for future research.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Peter Hines, Nick Rich and Malaika Hittmeyer

This paper describes the Value Stream Analysis Tool (VALSAT) as a rigorous analysis and decision‐making tool in the supply chain or value stream context. The tool can…

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1586

Abstract

This paper describes the Value Stream Analysis Tool (VALSAT) as a rigorous analysis and decision‐making tool in the supply chain or value stream context. The tool can employ both tacit and explicit knowledge for the advantage of the supply chain in which it is used. Although the approach owes its origins to new product development in the Japanese shipbuilding industry, it can provide many advantages over traditional analysis approaches in a value stream setting. VALSAT is demonstrated from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint, the latter involving an analysis of potential improvement in the Kenyan textile industry. The tool appears to be particularly useful in focusing knowledge and so in aiding decision making where there is a complex web of supply chain inter‐relationships and especially where data are a mix of subjective and objective assessments. Additionally it creates the right environment for increased intra‐ and inter‐company co‐ordination, allowing for improvement implementation programmes.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Nick Rich and Peter Hines

Develops the concept of time‐based competitive strategies within the context of supply‐chain management. Explores the current interest in supplier integration as a source…

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6720

Abstract

Develops the concept of time‐based competitive strategies within the context of supply‐chain management. Explores the current interest in supplier integration as a source of competitive advantage in consumer markets and proposes that the Japanese influenced network sourcing model provides a method whereby the advantages of vertical integration can be achieved without reducing the flexibility of product and material outsourcing. A central feature of the network sourcing approach is the use of supplier co‐ordination and development, facilitated by a supplier forum known as a supplier association. These associations represent a series of linking pins, extending from the focal purchasing organization, whereby the joint determination of supply chain improvements can be formulated and shared between a focal customer organization and entire groups of suppliers. Argues that the successful exploitation of these associations is a major pillar in developing and sustaining continuous improvement on a supply‐chain scale, where the efforts of each and every supplier are aligned to the changing requirements of the consumer market.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Peter Hines and Nick Rich

Develops a new value stream or supply‐chain mapping typology. This seven‐map typology is based on the different wastes inherent in value streams. The use of the various…

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36869

Abstract

Develops a new value stream or supply‐chain mapping typology. This seven‐map typology is based on the different wastes inherent in value streams. The use of the various tools, either singularly or in combination, is therefore driven by the types of waste to be removed. The tools themselves are drawn from a range of existing functional ghettos such as logistics, operations management and engineering. Maintains that two of the seven tools can be regarded as completely new. This cross‐functional approach means that the choice of tools to be used can be made from outside of traditional departmental boundaries, affording researchers and companies the opportunity to use the most appropriate tools rather than merely those that are well‐known in their function. Describes each tool briefly and gives a simple mechanism for choosing which is most appropriate to contingent situations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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