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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Barry Wilkinson and Nick Oliver

The issues and dilemmas facing companies, theirunions and their workers as they attempt toemulate Japanese‐style production practices arediscussed. Using the case of Ford…

Abstract

The issues and dilemmas facing companies, their unions and their workers as they attempt to emulate Japanese‐style production practices are discussed. Using the case of Ford UK as an example, the causes and effects of the 1988 strike and the withdrawal from the proposed electronics plant at Dundee are explored. Major obstacles to the successful introduction of practices such as just‐in‐time production are identified; however, once implemented these practices carry significant implications for unions and workers.

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Employee Relations, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Richard Delbridge and Nick Oliver

Noting moves towards just‐in‐time production methods in the UKpassenger vehicle industry, the impact of such moves at the retail anddistribution end of the supply chain is…

Abstract

Noting moves towards just‐in‐time production methods in the UK passenger vehicle industry, the impact of such moves at the retail and distribution end of the supply chain is considered. Based on interviews with a number of vehicle retailers selling cars manufactured both in the UK and overseas, it appears as if little progress towards true just‐in‐time (as practised by Toyota in Japan) is occurring.

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Logistics Information Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Nick Oliver

This article discusses the philosophy and supporting conditions forJapanese production management techniques like Just‐in‐Time. Westernemulation of the practice often…

Abstract

This article discusses the philosophy and supporting conditions for Japanese production management techniques like Just‐in‐Time. Western emulation of the practice often overlooks the implications it has for company organisation and personnel. Four issues are explored: high dependence; organisational politics; organisational control strategies; and corporate culture and strategy.

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Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Annette Davies, Ian Kirkpatrick and Nick Oliver

This paper will investigate some of the theoretical and methodological problems associated with the way ‘culture’ is defined and studied in organizational settings. In…

Abstract

This paper will investigate some of the theoretical and methodological problems associated with the way ‘culture’ is defined and studied in organizational settings. In short we raise the fundamental question of how culture is understood and explained, i.e., how does one actually ‘discover’ the culture of an organization? The paper will consider these issues in the context of research conducted by the authors on organizational mergers in which culture is defined as a network of communication rules/norms.

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Management Research News, vol. 15 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Nick Oliver

Images and concepts from contemporary manufacturing (particularlyjust‐in‐time production) provide models which individuals can use toincrease their throughput of work…

Abstract

Images and concepts from contemporary manufacturing (particularly just‐in‐time production) provide models which individuals can use to increase their throughput of work. Concepts of personal throughput, inventory, set‐up times and performance measurement are introduced and used to guide an analysis of personal productivity. The manufacturing metaphor is used to provide a conceptual base with which to analyse – and improve – personal performance in non‐manufacturing environments.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Jim Lowe and Nick Oliver

Recent years have seen traditional management practice questionned in many areas — in terms of personnel, manufacturing, buyer‐supplier relations and even accounting…

Abstract

Recent years have seen traditional management practice questionned in many areas — in terms of personnel, manufacturing, buyer‐supplier relations and even accounting practice. In the sphere of manufacturing we have seen the emergence of practices such as just‐in‐time production, total quality control and now the generic title ‘World Class Manufacturing’. In buyer‐supplier relations there has been a swing away from short‐term competitive contracting to longer term obligation arrangements based on the Japanese model. Traditional management accounting methods have been labelled The number one enemy of productivity' (Goldratt, 1983).

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Management Research News, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Nick Oliver and James Lowe

The management practices of three organisations in the computerindustry, one North American, one Japanese and one British owned aredescribed. Although operating in similar…

Abstract

The management practices of three organisations in the computer industry, one North American, one Japanese and one British owned are described. Although operating in similar marketplaces, markedly different management styles and practices were apparent, with the British company showing much less evidence of “human resource management” activities than the other two.

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Personnel Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Nick Oliver

Based on case studies collected at two UK factories, the issueswhich arise during JIT implementation are examined. These cases showthat the changes involved in a move…

Abstract

Based on case studies collected at two UK factories, the issues which arise during JIT implementation are examined. These cases show that the changes involved in a move towards JIT have a political dimension. The implication is drawn that, in implementing a JIT system, production managers need to consider the strategic aspects of the change as much as they do the machines and materials aspects. An equally strategic approach to human resource management is indicated.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Nick Oliver

This article reviews some of the key debates inthe area of just‐in‐time operation andimplementation, and identifies 13 research issues.These issues include: information…

Abstract

This article reviews some of the key debates in the area of just‐in‐time operation and implementation, and identifies 13 research issues. These issues include: information systems for JIT; organisational structures; performance measurement; the management of the supply‐manufacturer‐customer chain; location policy; purchasing and distribution strategy and the social implications of JIT.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Nick Oliver

One of the central tenets of total quality control is that responsibility for quality lies at the point of production. Salancik′s model of commitment is used to describe…

Abstract

One of the central tenets of total quality control is that responsibility for quality lies at the point of production. Salancik′s model of commitment is used to describe systems of work organisation which encourage employees to take on this responsibility. Commitment to quality can be fostered by managing the context within which production takes place. Management of the human aspects of total quality control may be informed by relevant ideas from the commitment literature.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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