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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Nick Joint and Derek Law

A number of distinct types of “electronic library” now exist. The term has shed the vagueness with which it has been used in the past. Moreover, certain forms of…

Abstract

A number of distinct types of “electronic library” now exist. The term has shed the vagueness with which it has been used in the past. Moreover, certain forms of electronic library service will prove more effective and durable than others. The most successful form of electronic library will reproduce the functionality of the traditional library, but must also fully exploit the unique features of electronic information provision.

Details

Library Review, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Nick Joint, Bob Kemp and Susan Ashworth

The GAELS Project is a two‐year project funded by the Scottish Higher Education Funding Council (SHEFC) strategic change initiative, which promotes collaborative…

Abstract

The GAELS Project is a two‐year project funded by the Scottish Higher Education Funding Council (SHEFC) strategic change initiative, which promotes collaborative information services to engineering researchers at Glasgow and Strathclyde Universities. This paper examines the role of user education in this process. We use arguments against the effectiveness of library skills education and evaluative methods learned from human‐computer interface design as a means of improving information skills training and as part of a general reflection on user education and library services. Such an approach shows how networked learning materials can be an effective tool for promoting a collaborative library service across the Glasgow Metropolitan Area Network.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 52 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Nick Joint

Abstract

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Library Review, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Nick Joint

Abstract

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Library Review, vol. 52 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Nick Joint

Abstract

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Library Review, vol. 52 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Eileen Breen

Abstract

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Eileen Breen

Abstract

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Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Nick Joint

Traditional approaches to library training flourished in the period of hard copy collection building, when certain common generic skills, such as those of cataloguing and…

Abstract

Traditional approaches to library training flourished in the period of hard copy collection building, when certain common generic skills, such as those of cataloguing and indexing, formed the bedrock of knowledge for many LIS professionals. The skills required in the digital library context are more heterogeneous, fluid and fast‐changing. They require a different training philosophy, one more closely identified with a “constructivist” approach to teaching and learning. This article attempts to flesh out these ideas by relating them to past and present practice, and sketches possible paths along which digital library training might evolve.

Details

Library Review, vol. 52 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

David McMenemy

Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2019

Alesia Moulton-Perkins, Alexandra Wressle, Nick Grey and Rebecca Sired

Applications for clinical psychology training far outstrip places and relevant work experience is key. Paid opportunities are limited and therefore many choose…

Abstract

Purpose

Applications for clinical psychology training far outstrip places and relevant work experience is key. Paid opportunities are limited and therefore many choose volunteering, with well-connected graduates faring best. To promote equal opportunities a coordinated psychology graduate voluntary internship programme was established in a National Health Service Trust in the South of England. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate intern and supervisor outcomes, equality of access and adherence to governance standards.

Design/methodology/approach

Three cohorts of interns, unappointed applicants and supervisors were surveyed. Between 2013 and 2016, 270 psychology graduates applied, 119 were recruited and 151 either refused a place or were unsuccessful. In total, 91 supervisors provided service-level feedback.

Findings

Interns and applicants were predominantly young, able-bodied white British heterosexual females. Demographic profiles were similar and broadly representative of psychology graduates nationally. While fewer were from Black and Ethnic Minority backgrounds, proportions were greater than the local population. Participants were more socioeconomically privileged than undergraduates nationally. The scheme was popular and well governed according to interns and supervisors. Post-internship employment prospects were improved, with most interns gaining paid mental health roles like assistant psychologist. Most supervisors commented on the positive contribution made by interns to service outcomes.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant contribution to the literature on voluntary psychology graduate posts, an area under-researched until now. Our results suggest that a coordinated, transparent approach can benefit both interns and services by minimising exploitation and maximising developmental opportunities for the new graduate. The programme makes an important contribution to addressing inequalities experienced by psychology graduates attempting to enter mental health careers.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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