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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2019

Alesia Moulton-Perkins, Alexandra Wressle, Nick Grey and Rebecca Sired

Applications for clinical psychology training far outstrip places and relevant work experience is key. Paid opportunities are limited and therefore many choose volunteering, with…

Abstract

Purpose

Applications for clinical psychology training far outstrip places and relevant work experience is key. Paid opportunities are limited and therefore many choose volunteering, with well-connected graduates faring best. To promote equal opportunities a coordinated psychology graduate voluntary internship programme was established in a National Health Service Trust in the South of England. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate intern and supervisor outcomes, equality of access and adherence to governance standards.

Design/methodology/approach

Three cohorts of interns, unappointed applicants and supervisors were surveyed. Between 2013 and 2016, 270 psychology graduates applied, 119 were recruited and 151 either refused a place or were unsuccessful. In total, 91 supervisors provided service-level feedback.

Findings

Interns and applicants were predominantly young, able-bodied white British heterosexual females. Demographic profiles were similar and broadly representative of psychology graduates nationally. While fewer were from Black and Ethnic Minority backgrounds, proportions were greater than the local population. Participants were more socioeconomically privileged than undergraduates nationally. The scheme was popular and well governed according to interns and supervisors. Post-internship employment prospects were improved, with most interns gaining paid mental health roles like assistant psychologist. Most supervisors commented on the positive contribution made by interns to service outcomes.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant contribution to the literature on voluntary psychology graduate posts, an area under-researched until now. Our results suggest that a coordinated, transparent approach can benefit both interns and services by minimising exploitation and maximising developmental opportunities for the new graduate. The programme makes an important contribution to addressing inequalities experienced by psychology graduates attempting to enter mental health careers.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Abstract

Details

How to Deliver Integrated Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-530-1

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2008

Tim Hobbs, Matthew Carr, Marc Holley, Nathan Gray and Nick Axford

The need for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to support evidence‐based services to improve outcomes for children is increasingly recognised by researchers and policy‐makers…

Abstract

The need for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to support evidence‐based services to improve outcomes for children is increasingly recognised by researchers and policy‐makers. However, this brings a pressing requirement to build research capacity for conducting RCTs and to address the concerns of practitioners who may be suspicious about the method. This article reviews a variety of texts on the subject, ranging from analyses of the historical and political context of RCTs, to concise introductions of the key methodological and practical issues, to more in‐depth discussions of complex designs and statistics. The article seeks to help readers navigate these resources by focusing on seven questions that seem particularly salient for those considering whether and how to commission, undertake, participate in or use results from RCTs.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

James Binnie and Zoe Boden

Research demonstrates that non-attendance at healthcare appointments is a waste of scarce resources; leading to reduced productivity, increased costs, disadvantaged patients…

Abstract

Purpose

Research demonstrates that non-attendance at healthcare appointments is a waste of scarce resources; leading to reduced productivity, increased costs, disadvantaged patients through increased waiting times and demoralised staff. The purpose of this paper is to investigate non-attendance and implemented interventions to improve practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods service audit took place in a primary care psychological therapies service. Existing service guidelines and reporting systems were reviewed. A cross-sectional design was used to compare a year’s cohort of completers of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) (n=140) and drop-outs (n=61).

Findings

Findings suggested contrasting guidelines and clinically inaccurate reporting systems. The overall service did not attend (DNA) rate was 8.9 per cent; well below rates suggested in the literature. The drop-out rate from CBT was 17 per cent. The most influential factor associated with CBT drop-out was the level of depression. The level of anxiety, risk ratings and deprivation scores were also different between completers and drop-outs. The main reasons given for non-attendance were forgetting, being too unwell to attend, having other priorities, or dissatisfaction with the service; again these findings were consistent with prior research.

Originality/value

A range of recommendations for practice are made, many of which were implemented with an associated reduction in the DNA rate.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2023

Matthew Charles Thorne, Nick de Viggiani and Emma Plugge

Globally millions of children have a parent who is imprisoned. Research suggests that this has an adverse impact on the child and imprisonment of a parent is considered to be an…

Abstract

Purpose

Globally millions of children have a parent who is imprisoned. Research suggests that this has an adverse impact on the child and imprisonment of a parent is considered to be an adverse childhood experience (ACE). Parental incarceration will not only affect the child but the entire household and may result in further ACEs such as household dysfunction and parental separation making this group of children particularly vulnerable. This scoping review aims to adopt an international perspective to comprehensively examine the extent range and nature of literature both published and grey relating to parental incarceration and the potential impact on children’s emotional and mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

In this scoping review, the five stages identified by Arksey and O’Malley (2005) were used including identifying the research question, identifying relevant studies, study selection, charting data, collating, summarising and reporting results. In addition, the included studies were appraised for quality using methodology-specific tools. A critical narrative synthesis was adopted to present findings and discussion.

Findings

Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Of the included studies, eight were retrieved from peer-reviewed journals and one from grey literature searching. Five categories with subcategories were identified affecting children’s mental health: 1) Relationships: parent and incarcerated child relationship; facilitators and barriers to maintaining contact; 2) Family structure; maternal or paternal incarceration; living arrangements during parental incarceration; 3) Children’s emotions: emotional recognition and regulation; resilience; 4) Prison stigma: social stigma; shame and secrecy; 5) Structural disadvantages: poverty; race/ethnicity.

Originality/value

This scoping review has highlighted how the imprisonment of a parent negatively affects their children’s emotional and mental health. Factors negatively impacting children’s emotional and mental health are interrelated and complex. Further research is required, including differences between paternal and maternal incarceration; impact of gender and age of child; poverty as an ACE and prison exacerbating this; and effects of ethnicity and race. An important policy direction is in developing an effective way of capturing the parental status of a prisoner to ensure that the child and family receive needed support.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Richard Scott V‐C and Joanna Gray

This case arose from the 1995 collapse of the Barings Banking Group caused by the enormous losses resulting from Nick Lee‐son's unauthorised derivatives trading in Singapore…

Abstract

This case arose from the 1995 collapse of the Barings Banking Group caused by the enormous losses resulting from Nick Lee‐son's unauthorised derivatives trading in Singapore, while general manager of Barings Futures (Singapore) Ltd. The holding company of the Barings Group, Barings plc, and a number of its subsidiaries were placed in administration as soon as the scale of the losses became apparent and in July 1995 the administrators submitted a report to the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry as they were bound to do by s.7(3) of the Company Directors’ Disqualification Act 1986 (CDDA 1986). Section 6 CDDA 1986 provides that it is the duty of the court to disqualify unfit directors of insolvent companies:

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2013

Mark Kantšukov and Darja Medvedskaja

Purpose — The purpose of this chapter is to study the pattern of rogue trading, paying special attention to the aspects of the dishonest behavior of…

Abstract

Purpose — The purpose of this chapter is to study the pattern of rogue trading, paying special attention to the aspects of the dishonest behavior of perpetrators.Design/methodology/approach — The chapter discusses selected cases of rogue trading that received the largest coverage by the mass media.Findings — No unique pattern of rogue trading schemes can be identified; however, certain similarities can be brought up based on the discussed cases. There are many aspects of dishonesty involved in fraudulent trading besides illicitness of unauthorized trading as such.Research limitations/implications — The chapter is based largely on a literature review and available data on the instances of rogue trading; probably, there is a vast amount of rogue trading cases undisclosed in order to draw a bigger picture.Originality/value — We apply the framework of white-collar crime process by McKay, Stevens, and Fratzl (2010) in order to clarify whether rogue trading schemes match the development of a typical white-collar crime. Conclusions are built on the analysis of several cases.

Details

(Dis)Honesty in Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-602-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Joanna Gray

In September 1996 the Securities and Futures Authority (SFA), the self‐regulatory organisation with responsibility under the Financial Services Act 1986 for much of the brokerage…

Abstract

In September 1996 the Securities and Futures Authority (SFA), the self‐regulatory organisation with responsibility under the Financial Services Act 1986 for much of the brokerage and dealing sectors of the financial markets, published a provocative and somewhat controversial consultation document containing proposals to amend its rules governing the responsibilities of senior executive officers. This initiative from the SFA was triggered by the collapse of the Barings group which, with the wisdom of hindsight, was seen to be attributable as much to a lack of quality, effective internal controls and management systems as to Nick Leeson's deception. Hence, the SFA broke new ground in its proposals to include in its rules specific expectations of a firm's senior executive officers as to general management controls and structures within a regulated firm and a particularly controversial proposal to reverse the burden of proof in regulatory disciplinary proceedings against such officers where the firm has suffered a serious financial or reputational damage where SFA suspects that management failure has been a cause or contributing factor.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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