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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Reinout Kleinhans, Nick Bailey and Jessica Lindbergh

Community-based social enterprises (CBSEs), a spatially defined subset of social enterprise, are independent, not-for-profit organisations managed by community members and…

Abstract

Purpose

Community-based social enterprises (CBSEs), a spatially defined subset of social enterprise, are independent, not-for-profit organisations managed by community members and committed to delivering long-term benefits to local people. CBSEs respond to austerity and policy reforms by providing services, jobs and other amenities for residents in deprived communities, thus contributing to neighbourhood regeneration. This paper aims to develop a better understanding of how CBSEs perceive accountability, how they apply it in the management and representation of their business and why.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine case studies of CBSEs across three European countries (England, the Netherlands and Sweden) are analysed, using data from semi-structured interviews with initiators, board members and volunteers in CBSEs.

Findings

CBSEs shape accountability and representation in response to the needs of local communities and in the wake of day-to-day challenges and opportunities. Apart from financial reporting, CBSEs apply informal strategies of accountability which are highly embedded in their way of working and contingent upon their limited resources.

Originality/value

Although research has shown the complex governance position of CBSEs, their application of accountability to target communities and other stakeholders is unclear. The paper coins the term “adaptive accountability,” reflecting a relational, dialectic approach in which formal, costly accountability methods are only applied to legally required forms of accounting, and informal practices are accepted by funding agencies and governments as valid forms of accountability, assessing CBSEs’ societal value in more open terms.

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2012

Nick Bailey

In the past two decades governments in Britain have launched a series of initiatives designed to reduce the disparities between areas of affluence and deprivation. These…

Abstract

In the past two decades governments in Britain have launched a series of initiatives designed to reduce the disparities between areas of affluence and deprivation. These initiatives were funded by central government and were delivered through a series of partnership boards operating at the neighbourhood level in areas with high levels of deprivation. Drawing on similar approaches in the US War on Poverty, the engagement of residents in the planning and delivery of projects was a major priority. This chapter draws on the national evaluations of three of these programmes in England: the Single Regeneration Budget, the New Deal for Communities and the Neighbourhood Management Pathfinders.

The chapter begins by identifying the common characteristics of these programmes, known as area-based initiatives because they targeted areas of concentrated deprivation with a population of about 10,000 people each. It then goes on to discuss the three national programmes and summarises the main findings in relation to how far key indicators changed for the better. The final section sets out the ways in which policy objectives changed in 2010 after the election of a coalition government. This produced a shift to what was called the ‘Big Society’ where the rhetoric favoured a transfer of power away from central government towards the local, neighbourhood, level. This approach favoured self-help and a call to volunteering rather than channelling resources to the areas in greatest need. The chapter closes by reviewing the relatively modest achievements of this centralist, big-state approach to distressed neighbourhoods of 1990–2010.

Details

Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-032-2

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2012

Abstract

Details

Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-032-2

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2012

Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts examines the complex, often controversial issues impacting those who live on the margins…

Abstract

Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts examines the complex, often controversial issues impacting those who live on the margins of society in our densely populated cities. The topic warrants research compiled by an international array of scholars and intellectuals from a wide range of disciplines, including but not limited to sociology, economics, political science, psychology, education, public health, law, criminology, history, urban studies, geography and demography, and urban planning, among others. This volume, from the first chapter to the last, richly details and informs us about the human condition, from multidisciplinary perspectives, about urban life in global contexts. Why is the study of urban life and urban marginality so consequential? The answer is simple. Because of the unprecedented pace of urbanization, a majority of humans now live in highly dense areas, in our cities. It is our cities which project the visual imagery of the stark class divisions in society. By 2050, it is projected that two thirds of the world's population will live in cities. Any volume which attempts to present dynamic issues in global contexts moves us toward resolving many of the conflicting and confounding issues which plague humankind, in the present, and will be with us in the future, if workable solutions are not found. As one reads the ensuing pages, you cannot help but come away better informed, noting the symmetry of complex societal issues of urban marginality across national boundaries.

Details

Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-032-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Larry Hubbell

Recently, the author facilitated a particularly difficult organization development (OD) intervention with a private non‐profit organization. It was an organization whose…

Abstract

Recently, the author facilitated a particularly difficult organization development (OD) intervention with a private non‐profit organization. It was an organization whose staff and governing board were deeply divided by interpersonal conflict. Although he tried to avoid it, the author found himself pulled into the politics of this organization. This intervention caused him to ask the question: Who is the client in an OD intervention? Is it the person who hired him? The entire organization? The organization's board? OD practitioners, as reflected in the academic literature, either provide conflicting views on this point or ignore the question altogether. Citing quotations from many prominent OD practitioners, including Golembiewski, Bennis, Burke, French and Bell, and Weisbord, the author searches for a definitive answer in the literature. In this paper, which is part literature review and part case study, he takes a critical look at the OD literature on this topic; ties OD to Jean Jacques Rousseau's concept of the general will; writes an in‐depth case study; and provides his reflections on this issue. The author concludes that within a highly politicized and contentious organization, it can be highly problematic for the OD practitioner to work for the organization as a whole, since he/she may, at times, be forced to take sides.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Adekunle Oke, Jasmina Ladas and Moira Bailey

This study aims to explore the motivation as well as barriers for ethical food consumption behaviour by focussing on the food consumption pattern of young adults in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the motivation as well as barriers for ethical food consumption behaviour by focussing on the food consumption pattern of young adults in the North East of Scotland. Considering the recent involvement of young adults in environmental activism, consumption behaviour of young adults in the North East of Scotland, an oil-based community, presents essential research interest to understand whether young adults often contemplate the consequences of their lifestyle.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explored the perceptions of ten purposive recruited young adults using semi-structured interviews to understand factors underpinning consumer's decision-making towards ethical food products.

Findings

The study reveals three key factors influencing ethical food consumption behaviour among young adults. The findings show that personal health and well-being are the main reasons why consumers engage in ethical food consumption. Also, it is observed that information facilitates decision-making by raising awareness regarding the social, environmental and health consequences of food production and consumption. Further, the findings show that situational attributes, such as product price and product availability, are creating dissonance when engaging in ethical food consumption.

Originality/value

This study contributes to sustainability research and the ongoing debate on consumerism by exploring ethical food consumption behaviour and highlights the need to address situational challenges, such as product price and availability. The study suggests that interventions to address current consumption patterns should also emphasise the social and personal benefits of food consumption rather than the environmental benefits that have been the focus of prior research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2010

Wee Toh and Nick Bernabè

This paper presents a comparison, based on real practical case studies, between the simple analytical BRE-Bailey method (BRE-BM) and the advanced finite element model…

Abstract

This paper presents a comparison, based on real practical case studies, between the simple analytical BRE-Bailey method (BRE-BM) and the advanced finite element model (FEM) Vulcan for the membrane action of composite slab panels with unprotected secondary beams at elevated temperatures. Both approaches predicted the membrane behaviour of the composite slabs, comprising compressive membrane action around the slabs' perimeter and tensile membrane action in the central span region of the slabs. This paper mainly studies the effects of the orientation of unprotected secondary beams and the boundary conditions on tensile membrane action of composite slab panels. The results show that the application of the BRE-BM is generally restricted by the conservative assumption of the maximum allowable vertical displacement. In contrast, the FEM estimates higher load-carrying capacities as well as providing a full displacement-time relationship throughout the heating of the slabs. For slab panels with unprotected secondary beams with an orientation in the short span, tensile membrane action can be easily mobilised without increasing fire protection to the boundary supporting beams. However, the FEM predictions on the slab capacities and deflections in fire are very sensitive to the continuity of the reinforcement over the protected boundary beams.

Details

Journal of Structural Fire Engineering, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-2317

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Abstract

Details

Values, Rationality, and Power: Developing Organizational Wisdom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-942-2

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2021

Sam Bailey

Abstract

Details

The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Rosanna Hale and Nancy Hodges

The purpose of this paper is to explore factors important to the product choice stage of the decision‐making process for the men's branded underwear consumer.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore factors important to the product choice stage of the decision‐making process for the men's branded underwear consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach to data collection and interpretation was used. Individual in‐depth interviews were conducted with fifteen participants who had purchased men's branded underwear within six months prior to the study. Eight males and seven females, aged 23‐55, were given a voucher to purchase men's underwear at a designated US department store and asked to bring their purchases to the interview. A semi‐structured interview schedule was followed which posed open‐ended questions about purchasing men's branded underwear in general and specifically with regard to the use of the voucher. Interviews were audio recorded with participant's consent and lasted approximately 45‐60 min.

Findings

A thematic interpretation of the interview data led to the development of three emergent thematic areas used to explore issues that surfaced within and across responses. Factors important to participants' decision‐making are discussed relative to their product choices. A typology of consumer profiles was developed from the data based on involvement level, brand loyalty, gender, evaluative criteria and silhouette preference.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include a focus on perceptions of US consumers located in a large urban area and a focus on the department store channel. Implications of participants' experiences for marketing men's branded underwear are considered.

Practical implications

This study provides insight into factors important to US consumers when purchasing men's branded underwear.

Originality/value

This paper offers an examination of consumer decision‐making relative to men's branded underwear, an understudied product category. Findings provide an in‐depth understanding of the consumer's perspective, an understanding that is essential to successful product development and brand positioning.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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