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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Volkan Yeniaras, Ilker Kaya and Nick Ashill

The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical and empirical understanding of how social ties affect innovation behavior and new product performance in Turkey, which…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical and empirical understanding of how social ties affect innovation behavior and new product performance in Turkey, which is an emerging economy where high levels of economic and political uncertainties exist.The authors examine whether innovation behavior binds the political and business ties of the firm to new product performance. They also examine if these effects are contingent on variations in the institutional environment and market environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling and mediation analyses were used on a sample of 344 small- and medium-sized enterprises in Istanbul.

Findings

Business ties are positively related to exploratory innovation behavior and political ties hamper such behavior. The authors also show that government support hinders firms’ disruptive innovation while encouraging incremental innovation behavior. The authors further demonstrate that the positive and indirect relation of business ties to new product performance through exploratory and exploitative innovation is largely insensitive to changes in market and institutional environments. Political ties are negatively (positively) and indirectly related to new product performance through exploratory (exploitative) innovation.

Practical implications

Managers should choose the form of their personal interactions (political and/or business) based on the type of innovation that is being pursued. Additionally, managers should consider both the institutional environment and the market environment as important contingencies in their decision of whether to invest resources in developing social ties to build innovation behavior.

Originality/value

The authors offer a deeper perspective of how social ties in emerging economies affect new product performance by considering exploratory and exploitative innovation behavior as mediating mechanisms. These mediating effects are conditional on institutional and market environments.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Jean Boisvert and Nicholas Jeremy Ashill

The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which gender impacts the evaluation of vertical line extensions of luxury brands in a cross-national context. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which gender impacts the evaluation of vertical line extensions of luxury brands in a cross-national context. The topic of brand/line extensions has been investigated in the mainstream branding literature. On the other hand, the topic has received less attention in the luxury literature. At the same time, while research has examined brand/line extensions from an international perspective, the impact of gender on consumer purchase intentions of luxury downward line extensions in different countries has remained unexplored.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an ANOVA design (2 extension types × 2 genders × 2 countries). The independent variables were ordered as follows: gender (male/female), vertical line extensions (upscale/downward) and country of living (France/USA). The purchase intention of the extension was chosen as the dependent variable.

Findings

The study results show that key differences exist between men and women regarding vertical luxury line extensions. For instance, women in both countries rate a new downward line extension of a luxury brand more positively than men. In contrast, although women evaluate a new upscale line extension of a luxury brand similarly to men in France, women are more positive than men in the USA. Also, US men rate an upscale extension less positively than their French counterparts. Finally, women in both countries rate luxury downward extensions more positively than men.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature of luxury brand management by examining how gender types process and respond to upscale and downward luxury line extensions versus purchase intentions in two different countries. This paper is unique as gender types are not often compared in previous research while fundamental distinctions exist, leading to significant differences. Practically, this study also provides key insights for marketing strategy development and adjustment for luxury manufacturers in terms of their target market, more specifically men versus women.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Madhumita Banerjee, Paurav Shukla and Nicholas J. Ashill

While the literature on migration highlights the reshaping of host and immigrant population in countries, there is a paucity of research in marketing investigating the…

Abstract

Purpose

While the literature on migration highlights the reshaping of host and immigrant population in countries, there is a paucity of research in marketing investigating the evolving dynamics for acculturation. The purpose of this study is to further the understanding of the emerging phenomenon of acculturation and identity negotiation.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments examined situational ethnicity, self-construal and identity negotiation in home and host culture work and social settings. Study 1 and Study 2 were conducted in the United Kingdom (UK), where the host country is the majority population. Study 3 was conducted in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where the host country is the minority population. Study 4 utilized qualitative interviews in both countries.

Findings

Results from all four studies show that ethnic consumers deploy “indifference” as an identity negotiation mechanism when the host society is the majority population (UK) and when the host society has the minority population (UAE).

Originality/value

The authors offer new insights into identity negotiation by ethnic consumers when the host society is the majority population as well as the minority population. “Indifference”, i.e. preferring to neither fit in nor stand out as an identity negotiation mechanism, is deployed in work and social settings of home and host societies. The authors also advance the existing literature on acculturation by examining whether independent and interdependent self-construal influence identity negotiation.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Nicholas J. Ashill, John Davies and Anthony Joe

This study contributes to continuing work on the development of a conceptual framework to better understand sponsorship, consumer response towards sponsorship efforts, and…

Abstract

This study contributes to continuing work on the development of a conceptual framework to better understand sponsorship, consumer response towards sponsorship efforts, and the contribution of sponsorship to customer-based brand equity, by seeking to validate a set of consumer-related attitudes to sponsorship. In particular, the study focuses on establishing the properties of consumer-related attitudinal constructs in the context of sponsorship of an annual national sporting event, the New Zealand Rugby Football Union's National Provincial Championship. Such constructs and their embedded scales will enable sponsorship managers to assess and distinguish consumer reactions to the event itself, to the commercialisation of the event, and to identify the consumer behaviours likely to benefit the sponsor of the event.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Matti Haverila and Nick Ashill

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how managers in technology‐intensive companies conceptualize and perceive “intelligence” variables in successful and…

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1441

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how managers in technology‐intensive companies conceptualize and perceive “intelligence” variables in successful and unsuccessful new product development (NPD) projects, and explore the role that intelligence variables play in differentiating between successful and unsuccessful NPD outcomes. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The most senior person responsible for NPD within a sample of Finnish technology‐intensive companies completed a self‐administered internet survey on the role of intelligence in successful and unsuccessful NPD projects. The JMP 1‐2‐3‐software package (version 8 for Mac) by SAS was used for statistical analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that managers in technology‐intensive companies rely on two broad types of intelligence, technical production and market information, during the NPD process. Most intelligence variables are positively related to NPD success. In addition, it appears that managers attach lower importance to intelligence variables in successful NPD outcomes when comparisons are made with previous research.

Practical implications

Managers in Finnish technology‐intensive companies should carefully analyze both technical‐production information and market information in the NPD process although technical‐production information is the more important factor in the analysis of information requirements in successful NPD outcomes relative to market information.

Originality/value

Although market intelligence variables have been studied in the context of differentiating successful and unsuccessful industrial NPD, they have largely focused on the NPD process in broad‐based industrial and manufacturing companies. The paper examines the role of market intelligence in the NPD process of technology‐intensive companies using Finland as the study setting.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Jean Boisvert and Nick J. Ashill

The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to assess the impact of extension innovativeness on attitude towards service line extension and the mediating role played by…

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5085

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to assess the impact of extension innovativeness on attitude towards service line extension and the mediating role played by extension quality (in relation to the parent brand); second, to examine the effect of consumer involvement as a moderator of the relationship between extension quality (in relation to the parent brand) and attitude towards the extension.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical investigation using a survey methodology was conducted with a sample of 664 respondents. The structural model was assessed using partial least squares (PLS graph).

Findings

The results suggest that in launching a new service line extension perceived quality of the extension (in relation to the parent brand) has a direct impact on attitude towards the service line extension and mediates the effect of perceived extension innovativeness on extension attitude. The findings also suggest that consumer involvement in the extension moderates the relationship between extension quality (in relation to the parent brand) and attitude towards the extension.

Research limitations/implications

Line extensions of other types of services and consumer goods could be investigated in futures studies. Involvement is a multidimensional construct. Other dimensions of involvement could be tested in similar contexts.

Practical implications

This study is important for managers of newly created service branches. In launching a new service line extension, marketers must be careful in developing the quality of the service as well as managing its innovation as both factors influence attitude and behavioral intention outcomes. Also, the moderating role of involvement indicates that managers must attempt to reduce risk perceptions during launch.

Originality/value

The paper makes an important contribution to the emerging service line extension literature.

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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Nick Ellis and Michel Rod

The basic thesis espoused in this chapter is that a discourse analytic approach, that explores managers’ stories, is equally valid as a more typical case study approach…

Abstract

The basic thesis espoused in this chapter is that a discourse analytic approach, that explores managers’ stories, is equally valid as a more typical case study approach that seeks confirmatory data. Depth interviews with industrial network participants are conducted and described; interviews where managers are encouraged to talk of their lived experiences, beliefs, attitudes, and intentions. Specifically, this case study presents a qualitative exploration of identity processes in industrial networks, in particular social constructions of Indian modernity. The analysis suggests what these constructions mean for the management of buyer–seller relationships (cf. Bagozzi, 1995). The study also reflects calls for more empirical research to be undertaken to improve understanding of contemporary marketing practices, especially in large emerging market economies such as India and Brazil (Dadzie, Johnston, & Pels, 2008). Discursive data were collected in the form of transcripts from semi-structured interviews with a variety of managerial participants involved in trade between New Zealand (NZ) and India. All the participants are Indian, with interviews taking place in 2006 in Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, and Chennai. Interviews were conducted in English; with 23 individuals representing organizations operating in the lumber, wool, horticulture, dairy, engineering, IT, tourism, and education industries, they lasted between 45 and 90 minutes, and were recorded on audio and video media. The study goes some way toward addressing the dominant Western perspective prevalent in most studies of business relationships, and shows how discourse analysis can provide a rich analytical perspective on business-to-business relationships.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Business-to-business Marketing and Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-080-3

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

John Amis

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Len Tiu Wright

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249

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Nick Ellis and Hildegard Wiesehofer-Climpson

Downloads
179

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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