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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Nicholas Maddock

In order to boost accountability and responsibility and to ensuredecisions are taken locally, donors are introducing arrangements wherebydevelopment products are managed…

Abstract

In order to boost accountability and responsibility and to ensure decisions are taken locally, donors are introducing arrangements whereby development products are managed by institutions in the recipient country. The main constraints are the temptations for donors to intervene where local management is weak, the shortage of good project managers and the ambiguous position of expatriates.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

Brian Wilson

This article explores the concept of Added Value, its definition and importance, in planning for national and company productivity.

Abstract

This article explores the concept of Added Value, its definition and importance, in planning for national and company productivity.

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Employee Relations, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Lisa Johnson

What is it about academia anyway? We profess to hate it, spend endless amounts of time complaining about it, and yet we in academia will do practically anything to stay…

Abstract

What is it about academia anyway? We profess to hate it, spend endless amounts of time complaining about it, and yet we in academia will do practically anything to stay. The pay may be low, job security elusive, and in the end, it's not the glamorous work we envisioned it would be. Yet, it still holds fascination and interest for us. This is an article about American academic fiction. By academic fiction, I mean novels whosemain characters are professors, college students, and those individuals associated with academia. These works reveal many truths about the higher education experience not readily available elsewhere. We learn about ourselves and the university community in which we work.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2011

Ron Beadle and Geoff Moore

In this chapter, we set out to demonstrate how organizational theory and analysis can benefit from the work of the distinguished philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre. In the…

Abstract

In this chapter, we set out to demonstrate how organizational theory and analysis can benefit from the work of the distinguished philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre. In the first part of the chapter we show how MacIntyre's conception of how rival traditions may move towards reconciliation has the potential to resolve the relativist conclusions that bedevil organization theory. In the second part, we show how MacIntyre's ‘goods–virtues–practices–institutions’ general theory provides a framework for reconciling the fields of organization theory and organizational ethics. In the third part, we provide a worked example of these two strands to demonstrate the implications of MacIntyre's philosophy for organizational analysis. We conclude with a research agenda for a distinctively MacIntyrean organization theory.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Su Maddock

Successful companies of the future must be more responsive tocustomers. Managers are being forced to question traditionalauthoritarian management practices for business…

Abstract

Successful companies of the future must be more responsive to customers. Managers are being forced to question traditional authoritarian management practices for business reasons. Discusses organizational effects of disadvantage and inequality, particularly in relation to women, but also in relation to black workers and those with disabilities. Discusses resistance to change by managers and the different perceptions of managers′ behaviour by themselves and by their employees. Discusses the practices organizations must adopt in the future. Equality measures are no longer a question just of social justice but are a business necessity if contracting is to develop around social values.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1950

THE centenary celebration is that of the apparently prosaic public library acts ; it is not the centenary of libraries which are as old as civilization. That is a…

Abstract

THE centenary celebration is that of the apparently prosaic public library acts ; it is not the centenary of libraries which are as old as civilization. That is a circumstance which some may have overlooked in their pride and enthusiasm for the public library. But no real librarian of any type will fail to rejoice in the progress to which the celebration is witness. For that has been immense. We are to have a centenary history of the Public Library Movement—that is not its title—from the Library Association. We do not know if it will be available in London this month; we fear it will not. We do know its author, Mr. W. A. Munford, has spent many months in research for it and that he is a writer with a lucid and individual Style. We contemplate his task with a certain nervousness. Could anyone less than a Carlyle impart into the dry bones of municipal library history that Strew these hundred years, the bones by the wayside that mark out the way, the breath of the spirit that will make them live ? For even Edward Edwards, whose name should be much in the minds and perhaps on the lips of library lovers this month, could scarcely have foreseen the contemporary position ; nor perhaps could Carlyle who asked before our genesis why there should not be in every county town a county library as well as a county gaol. How remote the days when such a question was cogent seem to be now! It behoves us, indeed it honours us, to recall the work of Edwards, of Ewart, Brotherton, Thomas Greenwood, Nicholson, Peter Cowell, Crestadoro, Francis Barrett, Thomas Lyster, J. Y. M. MacAlister, James Duff Brown and, in a later day without mentioning the living, John Ballinger, Ernest A. Baker, L. Stanley Jast, and Potter Briscoe—the list is long. All served the movement we celebrate and all faced a community which had to be convinced. It still has, of course, but our people do now allow libraries a place, more or less respected, in the life of the people. Librarians no longer face the corpse‐cold incredulity of the so‐called educated classes, the indifference of the masses and the actively vicious hostility of local legislators. Except the illuminated few that existed. These were the men who had the faith that an informed people was a happier, more efficient one and that books in widest commonalty spread were the best means of producing such a people. These, with a succession of believing, enduring librarians, persisted in their Struggle with cynic and opponent and brought about the system and the technique we use, modified of course and extended to meet a changing world, but essentially the same. Three names we may especially honour this September, Edward Edwards, who was the sower of the seed; MacAlister, who gained us our Royal Charter ; and John Ballinger, who was the person who most influenced the introduction of the liberating Libraries Act of 1919.

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New Library World, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Sarah Rutherford

Looks at broad approaches to organizational culture and offers a brief review of some recent work on gender and organizational culture. The possibility of seeing culture…

Abstract

Looks at broad approaches to organizational culture and offers a brief review of some recent work on gender and organizational culture. The possibility of seeing culture as a means of closure is explored. Seeks to define and operationalise organizational culture, in order to test the theoretical hypothesis on two case studies, and identify the ways in which aspects of culture acted to close off areas of work to women managers. Describes the constituents of this definition with reference to data from two case studies, and considers examples of the ways in which these different constituents of culture may act as means of closure to women managers in the organizations. Suggests that the approach provides a useful starting point for further research on organizational culture and gender, as well as giving a practical model for practitioners and consultants looking to develop a diversity inclusive culture.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Victoria B. Hoffarth

The recent years have been marked by the increasing participation of women in the labour force internationally. Especially in the industrialised countries of Western…

Abstract

The recent years have been marked by the increasing participation of women in the labour force internationally. Especially in the industrialised countries of Western Europe and North America, this labour force participation is now well over 40%. Globally, however, the estimate is around 33%. A large number of these women are still found in the agriculture sector and the informal sector of industry. For those working in the formal industrial sector, a significant portion work in the shopfloor of assembly line operations for products ranging from electronics to textiles. Women in management comprise less than 1% of all economically active women. For the purposes of this paper, a “manager” is defined as a person who has latitude in decision making as to the allocation and use of organisational resources, including physical, financial, and human resources.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Ann Elizabeth Esain, Sharon J. Williams, Sandeep Gakhal, Lynne Caley and Matthew W. Cooke

This article aims to explore quality improvement (QI) at individual, group and organisational level. It also aims to identify restraining forces using formative evaluation…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore quality improvement (QI) at individual, group and organisational level. It also aims to identify restraining forces using formative evaluation and discuss implications for current UK policy, particularly quality, innovation, productivity and prevention.

Design/methodology/approach

Learning events combined with work‐based projects, focusing on individual and group responses are evaluated. A total of 11 multi‐disciplinary groups drawn from NHS England healthcare Trusts (self‐governing operational groups) were sampled. These Trusts have different geographic locations and participants were drawn from primary, secondary and commissioning arms. Mixed methods: questionnaires, observations and reflective accounts were used.

Findings

The paper finds that solution versus problem identification causes confusion and influences success. Time for problem solving to achieve QI was absent. Feedback and learning structures are often not in place or inflexible. Limited focus on patient‐centred services may be related to past assumptions regarding organisational design, hence assumptions and models need to be understood and challenged.

Practical implications

The authors revise the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) model by adding an explicit problem identification step and hence avoiding solution‐focused habits; demonstrating the need for more formative evaluations to inform managers and policy makers about healthcare QI processes.

Originality/value

Although UK‐centric, the quality agenda is a USA and European theme, findings may help those embarking on this journey or those struggling with QI.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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