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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Jean Boisvert and Nicholas Jeremy Ashill

The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which gender impacts the evaluation of vertical line extensions of luxury brands in a cross-national context. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which gender impacts the evaluation of vertical line extensions of luxury brands in a cross-national context. The topic of brand/line extensions has been investigated in the mainstream branding literature. On the other hand, the topic has received less attention in the luxury literature. At the same time, while research has examined brand/line extensions from an international perspective, the impact of gender on consumer purchase intentions of luxury downward line extensions in different countries has remained unexplored.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an ANOVA design (2 extension types × 2 genders × 2 countries). The independent variables were ordered as follows: gender (male/female), vertical line extensions (upscale/downward) and country of living (France/USA). The purchase intention of the extension was chosen as the dependent variable.

Findings

The study results show that key differences exist between men and women regarding vertical luxury line extensions. For instance, women in both countries rate a new downward line extension of a luxury brand more positively than men. In contrast, although women evaluate a new upscale line extension of a luxury brand similarly to men in France, women are more positive than men in the USA. Also, US men rate an upscale extension less positively than their French counterparts. Finally, women in both countries rate luxury downward extensions more positively than men.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature of luxury brand management by examining how gender types process and respond to upscale and downward luxury line extensions versus purchase intentions in two different countries. This paper is unique as gender types are not often compared in previous research while fundamental distinctions exist, leading to significant differences. Practically, this study also provides key insights for marketing strategy development and adjustment for luxury manufacturers in terms of their target market, more specifically men versus women.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Paul Jeremy Williams, M. Sajid Khan, Rania Semaan, Earl R. Naumann and Nicholas Jeremy Ashill

A key issue for B2B industrial firms is to better understand the drivers of customer value and contract renewal decisions, due to the long-term supplier-customer…

Abstract

Purpose

A key issue for B2B industrial firms is to better understand the drivers of customer value and contract renewal decisions, due to the long-term supplier-customer relationships. When the B2B firm is operating across national boundaries, there is added complexity to the renewal decision, because the drivers are also influenced by cultural considerations. The purpose of this paper is to examine the main drivers of customer value creation and contract renewal intentions, for a large B2B firm operating in both the USA and Japan and compare the two data sets.

Design/methodology/approach

The company, which provided the data for the study, is a US Fortune 100 firm in the facilities management industry, operating worldwide. Data were collected using a survey questionnaire from a sample of the firm’s customers in two of its largest markets, the USA and Japan. The authors used PLS to analyze the data, and compare and contrast the drivers.

Findings

The findings highlight both similarities and differences across the two countries for the most influential drivers of customer value and contract renewal. Although no differences were found when examining the effect of relational drivers on contract renewal, differences were observed for utilitarian drivers: product quality and price.

Practical implications

The authors expected the relational drivers of contract renewal to be stronger in the high-context culture of Japan, but found that there were no differences with the US market. While relational drivers are important in the decision-making process in both countries, it seems that managers should focus more on price considerations in Japan. In contrast, product quality is relatively more important in the USA, when negotiating contract renewals with customers.

Originality/value

Noticeably absent from the B2B services literature is its application to international markets. In particular, research is lacking on the specific drivers of customer value and contract renewal intentions in the USA and Japan, despite the importance of long-term on-going contractual relationships in these markets. This study has provided additional insights into the complex world of contract renewal between international buyers and sellers of large industrial systems.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Paul Williams, Geoff Soutar, Nicholas Jeremy Ashill and Earl Naumann

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the drivers of customer value, and their respective relationships with customer satisfaction and behavioral intentions, between…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the drivers of customer value, and their respective relationships with customer satisfaction and behavioral intentions, between two culturally distinct groups of adventure tourists.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a descriptive design and compared data from 301 Japanese and Western adventure tourists who experienced the same adventure tour. The respondents were split into two groups, and a path modeling approach was used to examine similarities and differences.

Findings

The results indicated that Japanese tourists attached more importance to emotional value and novelty value. Western tourists, however, attached relatively more importance to the utilitarian dimension of price value for money.

Practical implications

The main implication of this study is that tourism operators should account for differences in value perceptions between Japanese and Western tourists when planning tour operations, training tour guides, and managing tour itineraries. Operators should also consider customizing their tour products to fit the specific needs of these different cultural groups. This reinforces the adaptation argument when marketing tourism to international consumers.

Originality/value

This study highlights that different value drivers affect the satisfaction and behavioral intentions of Japanese tourists, relative to Western tourists. The need for adaptation of tourism products toward certain international tourists is thus necessary. The research also reinforces the importance of conceptualizing and measuring customer value as a multidimensional construct in an international adventure tourism context.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Abdelkader Daghfous, Nicholas Jeremy Ashill and Michel Roger Rod

The purpose of this paper is to examine the knowledge transfer processes of knowledge intensive business service firms by focusing on the knowledge for customer, which is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the knowledge transfer processes of knowledge intensive business service firms by focusing on the knowledge for customer, which is the knowledge about the service provider's products and services, specifically “before‐sale” knowledge, and the transfer of this knowledge in order to develop customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an in‐depth qualitative study of the knowledge transfer process undertaken by a sample of six global knowledge intensive service firms, to use knowledge transfer as a means of customer development.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that customer absorptive capacity influences the role that knowledge for customers has in ultimately determining whether customer development will occur. Where tacit knowledge transfer occurs, it is restricted to loyal, high share customers. With respect to methods of transfer, the findings reveal that knowledge‐intensive business service firms transferring explicit knowledge utilise both formal and informal methods.

Research limitations/implications

Data collection was cross‐sectional and longitudinal research would have the benefit of examining how customer knowledge transfer changes over time during the customer development process (pre‐sale, during sale and post‐sale customer development). Future research studying other types of knowledge transfer, such as during‐sale and after‐sale knowledge transfer, are also encouraged.

Practical implications

Managers should be open to employing numerous types of media in transferring both explicit and tacit knowledge rather than restricting themselves to the normative “explicit‐formal‐media lean” versus “tacit‐informal‐media rich” categorisations in the literature.

Originality/value

Understanding the role of customer knowledge transfer in the development of existing organisational customers is particularly important in the context of knowledge intensive business service firms. The extant literature recognises that customer development efforts are critically important in increasing service adoption and firm performance but there exists a dearth of research on customer knowledge transfer in the context of professional service organisations.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Brent Lynn Selby Coker, Nicholas Jeremy Ashill and Beverley Hope

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a scale to reliably capture the variance of perceived risk towards purchasing on the internet at the product level.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a scale to reliably capture the variance of perceived risk towards purchasing on the internet at the product level.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐dimensional scale to measure internet Product Purchase Risk (IPPR) was developed and tested in three studies. In the first study a preliminary pool of items was generated with evidence of content validity. In the second study the IPPR scale was purified using principal axis factor analysis. In the third study evidence of criterion‐related, known‐group, nomological, and discriminant validity was demonstrated.

Findings

The IPPR scale was found to successfully capture the variance of evaluation judgement and internet security risk. IPPR was also found to have a quadratic relationship with experience purchasing a product category from the internet.

Research limitations/implications

Although strong evidence to suggest construct validity was demonstrated, it is understood that efforts to establish the validity of new measures should be ongoing. Specifically, although the IPPR scale was shown to produce reliable‐measurements for seven different products, the measurement of IPPR across more product categories would strengthen evidence of generalizability.

Practical implications

Given that risk is strongly dependent on the type of product, the procedure to develop the IPPR scale demonstrates the importance of measuring risk at the product category level.

Originality/value

This is the first study to develop and rigorously validate a multi‐item measure of purchase risk at the product level. Given the importance of risk in understanding online consumer behaviour, the IPPR scale will be useful for future studies in this domain, especially for comparing findings.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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