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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Chittipa Ngamkroeckjoti, Mark Speece and Nicholas J. Dimmitt

Some small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in the Thai food industry put a lot of effort into keeping up with changes of consumption patterns locally and in the South…

Abstract

Purpose

Some small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in the Thai food industry put a lot of effort into keeping up with changes of consumption patterns locally and in the South East Asia region. To see how successfully they are able to create competitive advantage, aims to examine the impact of environmental scanning practices on new product development (NPD) outcomes among SMEs in the Thai food industry. The technology strategy of the company influences how much it uses environmental scanning, and technology turbulence can play a role in exactly how critical is good knowledge of the external environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was conducted using semi‐structured in‐depth interviews with food experts and SME owners.

Findings

Results suggest that SMEs that practice environmental scanning are better able to develop appropriate new food products. Technology strategy plays a role in how much scanning they use, with a more proactive technology strategy requiring more extensive scanning. Environmental turbulence, including changes in technology, can cause failure in NPD if scanning does not keep companies aware of the situation.

Originality/value

A simple conceptual model is proposed to show how technology strategy, technological turbulence, and environmental scanning affect NPD performance.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Nadhakan Shinnaranantana, Nicholas J. Dimmitt and Sununta Siengthai

This study aims to analyze the skills and competencies required of corporate social responsibility (CSR) managers through best case practice in Thailand. It attempts to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the skills and competencies required of corporate social responsibility (CSR) managers through best case practice in Thailand. It attempts to define and identify how large companies use such attributes with regard to knowledge, attitudes, and practical skills. It also examines the organizational competency framework of strategy for integrating CSR and its associated skills into mainstream business.

Design/methodology/approach

As a qualitative study, the methodology used for collecting data consisted of both open‐ended and focused interviews with managers, and consultations with staff who implement CSR in these large companies. Secondary data from annual reports, sustainability reports and CSR reports were also analyzed.

Findings

The interviews indicated that specific skills and competencies were needed for managing CSR, but these varied, and a competency framework for Thai corporations was developed.

Research limitations/implications

The interviews were limited to only the CSR managers. Thus, the generalization of the findings to other industries should be done with caution.

Practical implications

A CSR competency framework for managers is provided, which can supply CSR skills and competencies model for other managers and practitioners.

Originality/value

The paper has value in that it provides an analysis of the CSR skills and competencies of the leading corporations in Thailand.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Supachart Iamratanakul, Yuosre F. Badir, Sununta Siengthai and Vatcharapol Sukhotu

The purpose of this paper is to rank the importance of the critical success factors (CSFs) for best practices in technology product development in the Thailand electronics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to rank the importance of the critical success factors (CSFs) for best practices in technology product development in the Thailand electronics industry and to determine the relationships between these factors in terms of their impact on project success.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with experts and a review of past studies are used to design an instrument for data collection. A case analysis is conducted to classify CSFs. Interpretive structural modeling (ISM) methodology is applied to analyze CSFs and investigate their relationships.

Findings

The authors identified 14 “driving” and “dependent” factors, which were then classified into four factor categories: linkage, autonomous, dependent, or independent factors. The results show that strategic alignment was the most significant CSF. Three factors which had a high driving power and were less dependent on others were: follow-up work, co-ordination, and relationships with clients.

Practical implications

The results may inform and assist technology project management in the little understood business cultures of the developing world. These finding may allow practitioners to prioritize the factors that drive project success when allocating their limited resources.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the field of project management by identifying the relative importance of the CSFs which enhance the management of technology projects. Despite the abundance of studies on CSFs, their importance has still not been fully explained. The findings provide insights into the degree of importance of the factors and their interdependencies, which can either drive or undermine project success. In addition, the ISM methodology the authors used is a unique approach in the project management field.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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